Health

  • The Beauty Bar: Coenzyme Q10

    Your body naturally produces a compound known as coenzyme Q10— aka Co-Q10, or ubiquinone. This antioxidant darling of the supplement world helps cells regenerate and protects them against damage that could lead to premature aging, heart disease, or even cancer.

  • Sidestep the Sniffles

    All too often, the return of autumn means another round of nagging colds and flus. Don’t want to spend the next six months wrapped in a cocoon of blankets, downing hold-your-nose cough syrup and mystery capsules? Forget about starving the cold and feeding the fever, and follow the lead from three healing methods—ayurveda, naturopathy, and traditional Chinese medicine.

    Uncommon remedies for the common cold
    By Matthew Solan
  • Pretty in Pink?

    Lipstick, eyeliner, mascara, perfume—Jessica Assaf applied them all, and more, before she hit 12. And by her mid teens, she estimates she was using 15 to 20 beauty products a day. Like many girls, Assaf was indoctrinated into the beauty culture at a young age, with makeover-themed birthday parties as early as kindergarten and trips to the nail salon starting in grade school.

    Companies now market makeup to girls as young as 3—and the health implications are huge.
    By Stacy Malkan
  • Ask The Doctor: Dry Skin

    Dry skin is often a sign of damage to your skin’s natural barrier from either over-bathing or an underlying allergic condition such as eczema. The skin holds in moisture with layers of flattened skin cells and fatty materials made up of waxes, cholesterol, and fatty acids. Over-bathing with soap and hot water washes away these layers as well as the salts in the skin that also hold water.

    My skin gets so dry every winter. What remedies will help?
    By Alan M. Dattner, MD
  • Handyman Health Alert

    Before you volunteerfor any more home decorating projects, guys, listen up: Men exposed to chemicals found in paint are two and half times more likely to have poor semen quality, according to new research published in the British medical journal Occupational Environmental Medicine.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Lung Cancer: Should You Worry?

    The first question most of us ask when someone gets lung cancer is: How much did she smoke? Unfortunately anyone can get the disease without ever lighting up. In fact, about 13 percent of those diagnosed with lung cancer are nonsmokers, according to the American Cancer Society.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Whole Lot of Hoopla

    Hoop dance has become the hippest new way to tone your core, improve your health, and get in touch with your inner dervish diva. Blending Native American hoop dance with Hawaiian hula and Middle Eastern belly dance, modern hoop dance emphasizes body awareness, sensuality, and the interconnectedness of life. Hoops vary in size and weight depending on your goals.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Focus On Food: Children's Nutrition

    Through his work as an associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, William Sears, MD, has found that as many as 50 percent of the kids who get diagnosed with ADD or ADHD also have poor nutrition. Sears believes they actually suffer from what he calls Nutrition Deficiency Disorder (NDD).

    By Nora Simmons
  • Pretty Healthy Bird

    Want to unlock the vital nutrients in your feathered friend’s birdseed to help her thrive? Try sprouting Polly’s food—it’s easy to do! Simply visit the bulk section of your local health food store and create a deliciously nutritious mix of seeds—sunflower, broccoli, and alfalfa seeds, along with lentils and wheat berries make great sprouts.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Detox’s Little Helpers—House Plants

    House plants do a lot more than just brighten up a room—they also help remove the toxins that cause indoor air contamination. Former NASA scientist Bill Wolverton harnessed his knowledge of the purifying powers of plants with his recent invention of a high-tech air filter that looks just like an ordinary potted plant (www.phytofilter.com). However, we prefer the real thing.

    By Melissa Lum