Health

  • A Clear & Plasic Danger

    In Hollywood’s 1967 classic The Graduate, our floundering hero, recent law school grad Ben Braddock, wonders what to do with his life when a family friend offers him a surefire career tip: “I want to say one word to you—plastics.” While Braddock doesn’t follow that advice, it was indeed solid counsel for that era.

    Plastic is not just littering the planet—its toxic chemicals are polluting our bodies. Find out why you need to reduce your exposure before it's too late.
    By Alan Reder
  • Men's Health Alert: Lower Your Cancer Risk

    Need more inspiration than your growing love handles to get you off that couch? New research published in the British Journal of Cancer found that men who work out at least 30 minutes a day have a 34 percent lower risk of dying from cancer than men who exercise less frequently or not at all.

  • Build A Better Breakfast

    A well-balanced morning meal may be the key to maintaining a healthy weight, but a recent study shows that eating a variety of foods for breakfast—for example, toast with a glass of milk and a banana, rather than just toast—also improves mental functioning and alertness.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • The Beauty Bar: Biotin for Brittle Nails

    If you have brittle nails that often split and peel, a daily dose of biotin could help. This little-known B vitamin contributes to the formation of keratin—an extremely strong protein that is a major component of nails.

    By Kim Erickson
  • Tea Time for Your Bones

    A new study shows tea does more than warm you up on a chilly afternoon. According to research published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, women (age 70 to 85) who were regular tea drinkers had a 2.8 percent higher hip bone-mineral density (BMD) than non-tea drinkers.

    By Emily Courtney
  • Keep Kids Healthy, Naturally

    For kids, back to school means excitement and anticipation. For parents, it means colds, flus, rashes—and back to the doctor. Come September, along with their art projects and homework assignments, kids start coming home with an array of germs that leave them—and the rest of the family—sick, sapped, and cranky.

    No need to run to the pharmacy once sniffle season strikes. These doctor-approved home remedies work. Really!
    By Jessica Downey
  • Alternative Medicine Cabinet: Fight Food Poisoning

    From fine dining to take-out Thai, Americans eat out much more than they used to—an average of four times every week. Food poisoning is also on the rise—it’s second only to the common cold in how frequently it strikes. Some 76 million Americans suffer from it each year.

    Bounce back faster with these gentle cures.
    By Victoria Dolby Toews, MPH
  • The Buzz on Bee Therapy

    Kathleen Miller, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, opened the bee box and with long-handled tweezers, removed a buzzing bee. She softly pressed its hind end on her knee. The bee stung her. At the time, says Miller, “I thought, This is wacko—plus, I’m killing an animal I love. What am I doing?”

    From arthritis to chingles, honeybees give the sting that heals.
    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Beat Golden-Year Blues

    In the last 20 years, the average life expectancy has increased 12 percent, but for our parents and grandparents living in nursing homes, a longer life may not mean a happier one. According to a recent study, one-third of nursing-home residents (median age of 82) suffer from depression. The good news: The fix may be as simple as supplementing with selenium.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Yoga Rx: Running Injuries

    No strangers to pain, runners do a lot of damage to their bodies while pounding the pavement or tackling the trails. Yoga can help by strengthening weak, underutilized muscles while healing overworked or injured ones, as well as tendons and joints, says Baron Baptiste, former athletic trainer and creator of Baptiste Power Yoga.

    By Nora Simmons