Health

  • Pain-Free Winter Paws

    Crisp air and fresh snow can bring out the silly puppy in the most regal of Rovers. But ice and snow mixed with salt, sand, and chemical de-icers will ruin winter fun in short order.

    By John Monahan
  • Feline Fecal Odor

    A super-smelly litter box has a pretty high yuck factor and may seem better handled by hazardous waste professionals than a vet. But holistic veterinarian Rachael Feigenbaum, VMD, at Lotus Veterinary Housecalls in San Francisco, urges that Stinky go in for a checkup.

    My kitty’s poop stinks up the whole house. Is there something wrong?
  • Not Soy Good For Fertility

    If you and your partner are having trouble conceiving, a soy-rich diet may be partially to blame. A small study from the Harvard School of Public Health found that men who ate roughly half a serving of soy food a day (about 1 cup of soy milk or one serving of tofu every other day) had significantly lower sperm concentrations than men who didn’t eat soy.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Brush Away Diabetes

    Gum disease may do more than ruin your beautiful smile—it may also increase your risk of type-2 diabetes.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Is Your House Making You Sick?

    Home will always be sweet, but it may not always be as safe as you’d expect. Levels of some common toxins—which can measure two to five times higher under your roof than outdoors—could be triggering a host of health problems for your family. Take these simple steps to make your home a truly safe (and healthy) haven.

    By Kristin Kane with additional reporting by Lynn Ginsburg and Nora Simmons
  • Beauty and The Bath

    Europeans have long known the true origin of the word spa: sanitas per agua or “health through water.” Before facials and massages became synonymous with spas, bathing was the premier avenue to personal wellness and whole-body detoxification. The citizens of ancient Rome considered a daily bath their civic duty to maintain public health.

    Give your skin a home spa pick-me-up.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Gut Feeling

    We get “butterflies in our stomach” when we’re nervous, “choke up” when we’re about to cry, and have a “gut feeling” when something just doesn’t seem right. We turn to “comfort food” when we’re depressed and forget to eat when we are stressed.

    Your emotional state controls your digestion more than you think.
    By Lisa Marshall
  • Health Secrets from Holistic Docs

    Even though I crave caffeine, carbohydrates, and chocolate right before my period, these foods make me feel bloated and aggravate my cramps. So to avoid the kind of aches and pains that can leave me feeling sapped for days, I make it a point to eat especially well during that time—lots of big salads and antioxidant-packed smoothies.

    Top practitioners share advice that can transform how you look and feel.
    By Nora Isaacs with: John Douillard, DC, Phd Christiane Northrup, MD Andy Seplow, Lac Lise Alschuler, ND Alison Eastwood, RD
  • Sniff Away What Ails You

    If holiday stress has you OD’ing on sugary snacks or pouring yourself that third glass of wine at night, a new study from the Warwick Olfaction Research Group in England offers a saner solution: Simply smelling certain fragrances has a stress-reducing effect on the brain that’s similar to food and even some mood-altering drugs.

    By Terah Shelton
  • What's My Alternative: Precription Drugs for Alzheimer's

    For Joyce Potter, a 73-year-old in Lutherville, Maryland, simple tasks like buttoning her shirt or tying her shoes have become impossible thanks to her Alzheimer’s diagnosis three years ago. In addition to memory loss, the disease has affected her muscle memory and coordination. She says she is often confused and struggles with depression as a result.

    By Nicole Duncan