Health

  • Gut Feeling

    We get “butterflies in our stomach” when we’re nervous, “choke up” when we’re about to cry, and have a “gut feeling” when something just doesn’t seem right. We turn to “comfort food” when we’re depressed and forget to eat when we are stressed.

    Your emotional state controls your digestion more than you think.
    By Lisa Marshall
  • Health Secrets from Holistic Docs

    Even though I crave caffeine, carbohydrates, and chocolate right before my period, these foods make me feel bloated and aggravate my cramps. So to avoid the kind of aches and pains that can leave me feeling sapped for days, I make it a point to eat especially well during that time—lots of big salads and antioxidant-packed smoothies.

    Top practitioners share advice that can transform how you look and feel.
    By Nora Isaacs with: John Douillard, DC, Phd Christiane Northrup, MD Andy Seplow, Lac Lise Alschuler, ND Alison Eastwood, RD
  • What's My Alternative: Precription Drugs for Alzheimer's

    For Joyce Potter, a 73-year-old in Lutherville, Maryland, simple tasks like buttoning her shirt or tying her shoes have become impossible thanks to her Alzheimer’s diagnosis three years ago. In addition to memory loss, the disease has affected her muscle memory and coordination. She says she is often confused and struggles with depression as a result.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Acne and Wheat

    While no studies have specifically linked gluten-sensitivity (an adverse immune response to wheat, barley, rye, and some oats) with acne, many doctors say the connection is a no-brainer: Wheat can trigger an inflammation response in the body.

    Forget chocolate—I’ve heard that wheat can be an acne culprit. Is this true?
  • Another Reason to Ditch the Pill

    Listen up, ladies: If you’ve got a knee injury, using birth-control pills may hinder your healing time. “Women have four to eight times more knee ligament injuries than men, even when playing the same sports,” says Ross Hauser, MD, a rehabilitation specialist in Chicago.

    By Joe Wallace
  • Heal Canker Sores Naturally

    Even life’s loveliest pleasures, like eating and kissing, lose their appeal when you’ve got a canker sore. No need to swallow your pain, however. New research in General Dentistry reports that licorice-root extract can heal these sores naturally.

    By Beth Swanson
  • Supplementing for Surgery

    We tend to think all supplements help improve our health, but when faced with surgery, we need to be more discriminating. Nutritional therapist Sue Van Raes explains what to take—and what not to take:

  • Sniff Away What Ails You

    If holiday stress has you OD’ing on sugary snacks or pouring yourself that third glass of wine at night, a new study from the Warwick Olfaction Research Group in England offers a saner solution: Simply smelling certain fragrances has a stress-reducing effect on the brain that’s similar to food and even some mood-altering drugs.

    By Terah Shelton
  • Beauty and The Bath

    Europeans have long known the true origin of the word spa: sanitas per agua or “health through water.” Before facials and massages became synonymous with spas, bathing was the premier avenue to personal wellness and whole-body detoxification. The citizens of ancient Rome considered a daily bath their civic duty to maintain public health.

    Give your skin a home spa pick-me-up.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Best Tressed

    Born with naturally curly (read unruly) hair, I’ve dedicated many dollars and hours to Operation Frizz Control, a strategy that has at times involved chemical relaxers, buzz cuts, greasy pomades, Technicolor gels, and even one tragically misguided perm (my stylist and I fi gured two negatives might make a positive—wishful thinking).

    Detox Your styling routine to reveal your healthiest hair.
    By Kate Hanley