Health

  • Harmful Hand Sanitizers

    Every purse, diaper bag, and glove compartment in America seems to house an antibacterial hand sanitizer. And while that chemical rub may keep your hands germ-free, it is hardly doing your health a favor.

    By Rosemarie Colombraro
  • On the Horizon: Natural Moisture for Your Contacts

    For many of the 34 million people in the US who wear contacts, dry, itchy, red eyes can be an uncomfortable and unattractive side effect that causes them to give up entirely and reach for their glasses. Recently Canadian researchers at McMaster University figured out how to attach hyaluronic acid—the body’s natural lubricant—directly to contact lenses.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • It's All Relative

    So your second toe is longer than the first, and you have 17 freckles across the bridge of your nose—your grandpa does too. And those gray flecks in your hair and your nearsightedness may indicate much more than a passing resemblance to your mom or dad. The hodgepodge of traits inherited from your parents and grandparents help make up your physical identity.

    Your family’s health history determines your biology—but not your destiny.
    By Jessica Downey
  • The 2009 Get Healthy & Stay Healthy Guide

    We’ve all heard the same advice a million times, no matter what our health concerns: Eat better, exercise more, and stress less. But why is that so hard for many of us to do?

    While most nutritionists and doctors tell us to eat plenty of fruits, veggies, whole grains, and spices—they don’t really explain how we can do that in three meals a day.

    By Lindsay Wilson, Nicole Duncan, Erin Quinn, Kate Hanley
  • Altitude Sickness

    You might want to pack ginkgo biloba and rhodiola along with your ski boots: When you ascend from sea level to a higher elevation, the air is thinner, making it tougher to take in as much oxygen with each breath.

    We’re taking a ski vacation and I’m worried about altitude sickness. Is there a natural way to overcome it?
  • Shower the Blues Away

    A new study reports that taking a short, cool shower once or twice a day might be just as effective in treating mild depression as mood-enhancing drugs.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • What's My Alternative: Acupuncture for TMJ

    For more than a year, Nancy Moore, 60, of Bellingham, Washington, suffered from debilitating jaw pain. Constant jaw clenching and teeth grinding—a result of the stresses in Moore’s life—led her to develop temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ), a condition that occurs when the joint connecting the lower jaw to the skull becomes inflamed and limits jaw mobility.

    By Alyse Clacy
  • Supplement Watch: Mulberry Leaf Extract

    Mealtime—a relaxing, pleasurable activity for most of us—is a challenge for type-2 diabetics because they have to monitor every morsel in order to minimize their blood-sugar fluctuations.

    By Gina-Roberts Grey
  • Healing Beauty

    When former model Blaire Kessler began treatment for breast cancer at age 31, her hair looked like a Brillo pad, her skin scarred badly, and her body became an early-menopausal mess. Well-meaning friends brought her skin creams that to her looked, smelled, and felt medicinal. Even the packaging depressed her—it seemed so drab and sterile.

    These soothing remedies can help you look and feel your best.
    By Lindsey Galloway and Elizabeth Marglin
  • Ask The Doctor: Asthma

    Natural medicine has a lot to offer when it comes to managing asthma long term, but don’t ditch your corticosteroid inhaler just yet. During a severe attack, it’s often the only thing that can help you. Natural remedies can reduce the overall severity of asthma, however, and decrease or eventually eliminate your dependence on meds like corticosteroids and bronchodilators.

    I have asthma and use an inhaler regularly. Are there any long-term effects, and is there anything I can do to use it less?
    By Rob Ayoup