Health

  • Pill Free, Pain Free

    Athletes often joke about relying on “vitamin I,” aka ibuprofen, to get through the aches and pains of training. But they’re not the only ones who depend on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain relief.

    Swap your meds for these natural and effective alternatives.
    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Ask The Doctor: Seasional Affective Disorder

    It sounds like you have seasonal affective disorder (appropriately abbreviatedas “SAD”). The diagnosis requires that symptoms, which may include feelings of depression, hopelessness, loss of energy, anxiety, sleeplessness, difficulty concentrating, and carbohydrate cravings, be present for two winters.

    I can barely get out of bed on winter mornings. What’s wrong with me?
    By James S. Gordon, MD
  • No Child Left Bananas

    Just like adults, children can feel completely out of control when they get stressed. Teaching them, by example, to stay present, quiet their minds, and check in with their gut feelings will help them learn to contain their emotions safely so temper tantrums don’t become their default mode of expression.

    By Elizabeth Marglin
  • Ear Infections May Lead to Weight Gain

    It sounds crazy, and even a bit cruel, that those ear infections that made you miserable as a kid may have returned to haunt you in the form of fast-food cravings and persistent belly fat. But new research shows that people who suffered moderate to severe middle ear infections when they were young were 62 percent more likely to be obese at the time of the study.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Yoga for Hip Flexors

    Your hip flexors can tighten as a result of an abnormal tilt of the pelvis and from too much sitting. Also, “biking, running, and activities where you are in a hunched-over position lead to tight hip flexors because the muscle is being shortened,” says De West, yoga therapist at the Yoga Workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

    Elizabeth Gregg
  • Harmful Hand Sanitizers

    Every purse, diaper bag, and glove compartment in America seems to house an antibacterial hand sanitizer. And while that chemical rub may keep your hands germ-free, it is hardly doing your health a favor.

    By Rosemarie Colombraro
  • On the Horizon: Natural Moisture for Your Contacts

    For many of the 34 million people in the US who wear contacts, dry, itchy, red eyes can be an uncomfortable and unattractive side effect that causes them to give up entirely and reach for their glasses. Recently Canadian researchers at McMaster University figured out how to attach hyaluronic acid—the body’s natural lubricant—directly to contact lenses.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Shower the Blues Away

    A new study reports that taking a short, cool shower once or twice a day might be just as effective in treating mild depression as mood-enhancing drugs.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • Healing Beauty

    When former model Blaire Kessler began treatment for breast cancer at age 31, her hair looked like a Brillo pad, her skin scarred badly, and her body became an early-menopausal mess. Well-meaning friends brought her skin creams that to her looked, smelled, and felt medicinal. Even the packaging depressed her—it seemed so drab and sterile.

    These soothing remedies can help you look and feel your best.
    By Lindsey Galloway and Elizabeth Marglin
  • It's All Relative

    So your second toe is longer than the first, and you have 17 freckles across the bridge of your nose—your grandpa does too. And those gray flecks in your hair and your nearsightedness may indicate much more than a passing resemblance to your mom or dad. The hodgepodge of traits inherited from your parents and grandparents help make up your physical identity.

    Your family’s health history determines your biology—but not your destiny.
    By Jessica Downey