Health

  • Pink Grapefruit and Fig Tart

    Shell
    1/2 cup chopped pecans
    1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
    1 tablespoon butter
    1/4 cup fresh dates
    2 egg whites
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Filling
    2 grapefruit, peeled and pith removed
    1 whole cinnamon stick or 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    2 tablespoons honey
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 cups fresh or dried mission figs, halved (about 10 fresh figs)
    2 cups Greek–style yogurt

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix pecans, flour, butter, and dates into a fine meal in a food processor. Blend in egg whites and salt.

    2. Coat the inside of a tart pan with natural cooking spray. Line the bottom with parchment paper cut to fit, and coat again. Place dough in pan, and flatten evenly with your fingers to form a thin layer. Score dough by poking it with a fork. Place a piece of parchment paper over the dough and cover with pastry weights (use dried beans if you don’t own weights).

    3. Bake tart dough until the sides begin to brown, about 15 minutes. Remove parchment paper and continue baking until the bottom has completely cooked, an additional 15 to 20 minutes.

    4. Segment grapefruit, holding fruit over a bowl to reserve approximately 1/4 to 1/2 cup juice. Grate the peel of 1 grapefruit, and place grated peel, cinnamon, honey, sugar, and reserved juice in a saucepan. Simmer on low heat until mixture begins to thicken, about 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.

    5. Remove cinnamon stick from mixture, and stir in figs and grapefruit segments. Place 1 cup yogurt in the bottom of the tart shell, then top with fruit mixture. To serve, cut into 8 portions and garnish with a dollop of remaining yogurt.

    nutrition info per serving: 240 calories; 8 g fat; 8 mg cholesterol; 8 g protein; 39 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 110 mg sodium

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