Health

  • 5 Steps to Pretty Feet

    Your feet likely took a beating this summer. Now, shape up heel to toe in five easy, natural steps.
  • Why Sleeping In Isn't Enough

    Although the occasional all-nighter is OK, people who regularly skimp on z’s can’t undo sleep deprivation’s detrimental effects by simply hitting the snooze button on weekends, says a new study in the journal Science of Translation Medicine.

    By Stacey Lindsay
  • Pink Grapefruit and Fig Tart

    Shell
    1/2 cup chopped pecans
    1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
    1 tablespoon butter
    1/4 cup fresh dates
    2 egg whites
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Filling
    2 grapefruit, peeled and pith removed
    1 whole cinnamon stick or 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    2 tablespoons honey
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 cups fresh or dried mission figs, halved (about 10 fresh figs)
    2 cups Greek–style yogurt

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix pecans, flour, butter, and dates into a fine meal in a food processor. Blend in egg whites and salt.

    2. Coat the inside of a tart pan with natural cooking spray. Line the bottom with parchment paper cut to fit, and coat again. Place dough in pan, and flatten evenly with your fingers to form a thin layer. Score dough by poking it with a fork. Place a piece of parchment paper over the dough and cover with pastry weights (use dried beans if you don’t own weights).

    3. Bake tart dough until the sides begin to brown, about 15 minutes. Remove parchment paper and continue baking until the bottom has completely cooked, an additional 15 to 20 minutes.

    4. Segment grapefruit, holding fruit over a bowl to reserve approximately 1/4 to 1/2 cup juice. Grate the peel of 1 grapefruit, and place grated peel, cinnamon, honey, sugar, and reserved juice in a saucepan. Simmer on low heat until mixture begins to thicken, about 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.

    5. Remove cinnamon stick from mixture, and stir in figs and grapefruit segments. Place 1 cup yogurt in the bottom of the tart shell, then top with fruit mixture. To serve, cut into 8 portions and garnish with a dollop of remaining yogurt.

    nutrition info per serving: 240 calories; 8 g fat; 8 mg cholesterol; 8 g protein; 39 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 110 mg sodium

  • Soothe Patches' Scratches

    Does your dog scratch himself silly this time of year? Like you, he may be allergic to early-summer pollens and molds. But steroid-based itch treatments can cause diabetes, osteoporosis, and liver disease, warns Shawn Messonnier, DVM, holistic vet and author of The Natural Health Bible for Dogs and Cats (Three Rivers Press, 2001). Here are natural ways to fight the itch.

    by O'Rya Hyde-Keller
  • Is Stress Ruining Your Health?

    We don’t need researchers to tell us that stress is rampant in the US. But in its 2009 Stress in America study, the American Psychological Association found that 24 percent of adults are experiencing high levels of tension—and 42 percent of us were more stressed out last year than the previous year.

    Stress can be a wrecking ball to your body, mind, and spirit. Here's what to do about it.
    By Sarah Tuff
  • Weight Loss in a Bottle

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 68 percent of Americans are overweight and more than one-third are considered obese. Millions of people are trying to lose weight—and most wish it were as simple as popping a pill.

    Our guide to the best and worse diet supplements on the market today.
    By Gina Demillo Wagner
  • Herbal Insect Avengers

    Certain oils in mint, clove, rosemary, sage, and thyme are safe for humans but deadly to pesky aphids and mites. To make an herbal pesticide for a small window garden, mash 1 to 2 cups of fresh leaves with a pestle. Fill a spray bottle with 2 to 4 cups of water, mix in the herbs, and let it sit overnight so the essential oils infuse the water.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Ask The Doctor: Low Libido

    It’s common for our sex drives to dwindle as we grow older—and the numbers tell the story. The Kinsey Institute notes that while 18- to 29-year-olds have sex an average of 112 times per year, the 40 to 49 set has sex just 69 times a year—that’s a nearly 50 percent decline over a 20-year period.

    I'm in a healthy, happy relationship, but my sex drive has started to lag in recent years. Why is this, and how can I revive my libido?
  • Grooming for Guys

    No matter how rugged your guy, his skin is just as sensitive as yours—perhaps even more delicate. Male hormones, such as androgen, trigger increased production of sebum, the skin’s natural oils, which encourages bacteria and fungus overgrowth. Ironically, these conditions lead to dry, irritated skin, says Cindy Angerhofer, PhD, executive director of botanical research at Aveda.

    Help him choose and use safe, natural products.
    By Joel Warner
  • The Biofeedback Boost

    Biofeedback therapy is winning as many accolades as the movie No Country for Old Men won Oscars. A watchdog group, the American Health Care Policy Review board, reviewed the many studies done on the effectiveness of biofeedback and gave the mind-body therapy a Grade A rating. How does it work?

    By Kris Kucera