In Season

  • In Season: Kale

    If kale’s rough texture and earthy flavor intimidate you, consider one more reason to step out of your comfort zone: This wild cabbage has more nutritional value in fewer calories than most foods you’ll find in the produce aisle. Rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A, C, and K, kale also has seven times the beta-carotene of broccoli and 10 times more lutein.

  • Sweet and Spicy Salad Dressing

    1/4 cup fresh-squeezed orange juice
    1 tablespoon each of grated orange peel
    Ginger
    Sesame oil
    Rice vinegar
    Cilantro, minced
    1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame oil.

    In a small jar, combine orange juice, grated orange peel, finely grated ginger, sesame oil, rice vinegar, and minced cilantro, and toasted sesame oil. Shake well to blend, season with salt and pepper, and serve over a salad of cold soba noodles, grated carrot, snow peas, and black sesame seeds.

  • Zesty Parfait

    1 tablespoon orange peel, finely grated
    2 tablespoons fresh-squeezed orange juice
    1 teaspoon agave nectar
    1/4 cup organic yogurt
    Orange
    Blackberies
    Fresh mint

    In a small bowl, combine orange peel, fresh-squeezed orange juice, and agave nectar with organic yogurt. Drizzle over a fruit salad of blood orange segments and defrosted blackberries; garnish with fresh mint.

  • Cranberry-Orange Quinoa

    1 tablespoon grated orange peel
    1 tablespoon dried cranberries
    2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
    2 cups quinoa, cooked
    1/4 cup red onion, finely minced
    1 orange, cubed

    Add grated orange peel, dried cranberries, and chopped walnuts to cooked quinoa; add inely minced red onion and cubed segments of one orange

  • Cranberry-Orange Quinoa

    1 tablespoon grated orange peel
    1 tablespoons dried cranberries
    2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
    2 cups quinoa, cooked
    1/4 cup red onion, finely minced
    1 orange, cubed

    Add grated orange peel, dried cranberries, and chopped walnuts to cooked quinoa; add inely minced red onion and cubed segments of one orange

  • In Season: Oranges

    Despite its leathery skin, an orange is actually a type of berry, which helps explain its juicy sweetness and long list of health-promoting nutrients. A medium orange contains 62 calories, 3 grams of fiber, and nearly 120 percent of the daily value of immune-boosting vitamin C.

    By Lisa Turner
  • Cranberry-Orange Quinoa

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    1 tablespoon grated orange peel
    1 tablespoons dried cranberries
    2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
    2 cups quinoa, cooked
    1/4 cup red onion, finely minced
    1 orange, cubed

    Add grated orange peel, dried cranberries, and chopped walnuts to cooked quinoa; add finely minced red onion and cubed segments of one orange

  • In Season: Kiwi

    Tired of apples, pears, and other fall fruits? Slice open a kiwi. This fuzzy piece of produce is packed with heart-healthy nutrients like potassium, magnesium, and vitamins C and E. Research shows eating kiwis daily may help prevent heart disease and stroke by limiting the blood’s ability to form life-threatening clots and by lowering triglycerides—fats that thicken the blood.

    By Beth Bence Reinke
  • In Season: Spaghetti Squash

    With more than 145 percent of the daily value of vitamin A per cup and loads of vitamin C, potassium, fiber, and manganese, this seasonal favorite should make frequent appearances at your fall table.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Spaghetti Squash Cucumber Salad

    3 cups cooked spaghetti squash strands
    2 cups cucumber, peeled, chopped, and seeded
    2 cups diced tomatoes, seeded
    1/2 cup red pepper, diced
    1/4 cup red onion, thinly sliced
    3 tablespoons rice vinegar
    2 teaspoons olive oil
    1/8 teaspoon black pepper
    3/4 cup crumbled feta cheese

    In a large bowl, combine ingredients. Toss the salad with the dressing and then sprinkle on feta cheese.