In Season

  • Roasted Red Pepper and Fava Crostini

    1 baguette, cut into 1/2-inch slices
    Olive oil
    1 cup roasted red peppers
    3/4 cup fava beans
    1 garlic clove
     

    1. Arrange baguette slices on baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, and bake at 375 degrees for 5 minutes or until golden.
    2. In a food processor, pulse roasted red peppers, fava beans, and garlic clove until combined.
    3. Spread 1 tablespoon of mixture onto each slice of bread.

  • In Season: Fava Beans

    This eastern Mediterranean member of the pea family makes its debut in late spring. Favas pack a huge protein punch, boast ample amounts of fiber and iron, and contain L-dopa, an amino acid that produces dopamine, which triggers a feel-good response in the brain. Look for firm, vibrant green pods for the best flavor.

    By Caroline Mosey
  • Grilled Halibut with Fava Bean Mash

    Halibut fillet
    Salt and pepper to taste
    1/2 cup fava beans
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
     

    1. Season halibut fillet with salt and pepper, grill 3 minutes on each side or until cooked through.
    2. In a medium bowl, combine fava beans,  olive oil, and lemon juice. Mash roughly with a fork until combined.
    3. Place fish on top of the fava bean mash.

  • Angel Hair with Feta and Fava Crostini

    1/4 pound angel hair pasta
    2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil
    1/2 cup fava beans
    2 ounces crumbled feta cheese
    Coarse sea salt for seasoning

    1. Cook and toss angel hair pasta with olive oil.
    2. Add fava beans and crumbled feta cheese.
    3. Season with coarse sea salt. Serve warm.

  • In Season: Rhubarb

    It got the nickname “pie plant” thanks to its mouthwatering pie pairing with strawberries, but rhubarb is actually a more versatile veggie than that. And there’s good reason to experiment with rhubarb beyond the pie plate: Studies show that rhubarb has anticancer properties and can even help lower blood pressure.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • In Season: Artichokes

    Once considered an aphrodisiac, artichokes literally feed the heart. In fact, in a study assessing the heart health–promoting antioxidant levels of more than a thousand different foods, artichoke hearts measured the highest of all vegetables, and ranked fourth overall. The reason? Artichokes contain silymarin, known to protect against skin cancer and promote healthy liver function.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • In Season: Belgian Endive

    This pleasantly bitter but slightly sweet member of the chicory family is at its peak from November to April. With only one calorie per leaf, this fat-, sodium-, and cholesterol-free vegetable provides an excellent source of folate and heart-healthy potassium.

    By Stacy Brugeman
  • Greek-Style Kale Salad

    3/4 pound kale leaves
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup lemon juice
    1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    Salt and pepper
    1/2 cup grape tomatoes
    1/3 cup kalamata olives, pitted
    2 ounches crumbled feta

    1. In a large pot of boiling water, blanch kale leaves until just tender, about 1 minute. Drain, and rinse under cold water to cool.

    2. Transfer kale to a clean kitchen towel, and press dry. Fluff up the leaves, coarsely chop, and transfer to a large bowl.

    3. In another bowl, combine olive oil with 1lemon juice,  crushed red pepper, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add grape tomatoes, kalamata olives, and crumbled feta to the kale.

    4. Add the dressing, and toss to coat. Great by itself, or chop finely and use as a stuffing for roasted red bell peppers.

  • Steamed Sesame Kale

    1 large leek, sliced into 1/4-inch rounds
    1 head of kale, chopped into small pieces
    1 to 2 tablespoons extra-vigin olive oil
    2 tablespoons seasame seeds, toasted
    Tamari or soy sauce
    2 teaspoons ume plum vinegar or lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    1. In a large steamer, place  leek. Steam until translucent, mixing occasionally; then add one head of chopped kale. Steam just long enough so that kale is tender, but not soggy.

    2. Remove, and toss in bowl with extra-virgin olive oil, toasted sesame seeds, a few splashes of tamari or soy sauce, and ume plum vinegar or lemon juice. Salt to taste.

  • No-Cook Massaged Kale

    1 bunch of kale, finely chopped
    2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2 tablespoons lemon juice, fresh
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    Tomato, avacado, chili powder (optional)

    In a large bowl, combine kale, extra-virgin olive oil, lemon juice, and sea salt. Using your hands, massage all the ingredients together—tenderizing the greens without having to cook them. Add tomato, avocado, and chili powder for a Mexican flair.