In Season

  • In Season: Papaya

    Dubbed “fruit of the angels” by Christopher Columbus, meltingly sweet papaya offers a splash of exotic flair to sweet and savory dishes. Available year round but best in summer and fall, one papaya has more than three times the daily value of powerhouse antioxidant vitamin C, which helps boost immunity and heart health.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Grilled Halibut with Fava Bean Mash

    Halibut fillet
    Salt and pepper to taste
    1/2 cup fava beans
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
     

    1. Season halibut fillet with salt and pepper, grill 3 minutes on each side or until cooked through.
    2. In a medium bowl, combine fava beans,  olive oil, and lemon juice. Mash roughly with a fork until combined.
    3. Place fish on top of the fava bean mash.

  • Angel Hair with Feta and Fava Crostini

    1/4 pound angel hair pasta
    2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil
    1/2 cup fava beans
    2 ounces crumbled feta cheese
    Coarse sea salt for seasoning

    1. Cook and toss angel hair pasta with olive oil.
    2. Add fava beans and crumbled feta cheese.
    3. Season with coarse sea salt. Serve warm.

  • Roasted Red Pepper and Fava Crostini

    1 baguette, cut into 1/2-inch slices
    Olive oil
    1 cup roasted red peppers
    3/4 cup fava beans
    1 garlic clove
     

    1. Arrange baguette slices on baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, and bake at 375 degrees for 5 minutes or until golden.
    2. In a food processor, pulse roasted red peppers, fava beans, and garlic clove until combined.
    3. Spread 1 tablespoon of mixture onto each slice of bread.

  • In Season: Fava Beans

    This eastern Mediterranean member of the pea family makes its debut in late spring. Favas pack a huge protein punch, boast ample amounts of fiber and iron, and contain L-dopa, an amino acid that produces dopamine, which triggers a feel-good response in the brain. Look for firm, vibrant green pods for the best flavor.

    By Caroline Mosey
  • Creamy Fava Bean Soup

    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1/2 shallot
    2 cups chicken broth
    2 cups fava beans
    2 tablespoons cream
    1 teaspoon thyme
    Salt and pepper to taste

    1. In a large pot, heat olive oil. Add  shallot, finely minced, and sauté until tender.
    2. Add chicken broth and fava beans; cover and simmer for 10 minutes.
    3. Using a blender, puree soup in batches until smooth, and return to pot.
    4. Stir in cream and chopped thyme. Salt and pepper to taste.

  • In Season: Rhubarb

    It got the nickname “pie plant” thanks to its mouthwatering pie pairing with strawberries, but rhubarb is actually a more versatile veggie than that. And there’s good reason to experiment with rhubarb beyond the pie plate: Studies show that rhubarb has anticancer properties and can even help lower blood pressure.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • In Season: Artichokes

    Once considered an aphrodisiac, artichokes literally feed the heart. In fact, in a study assessing the heart health–promoting antioxidant levels of more than a thousand different foods, artichoke hearts measured the highest of all vegetables, and ranked fourth overall. The reason? Artichokes contain silymarin, known to protect against skin cancer and promote healthy liver function.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • In Season: Belgian Endive

    This pleasantly bitter but slightly sweet member of the chicory family is at its peak from November to April. With only one calorie per leaf, this fat-, sodium-, and cholesterol-free vegetable provides an excellent source of folate and heart-healthy potassium.

    By Stacy Brugeman
  • In Season: Kale

    If kale’s rough texture and earthy flavor intimidate you, consider one more reason to step out of your comfort zone: This wild cabbage has more nutritional value in fewer calories than most foods you’ll find in the produce aisle. Rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A, C, and K, kale also has seven times the beta-carotene of broccoli and 10 times more lutein.