In Season

  • Eating in Season

    Foods that are in season contain peak nutrients and generally put less of a dent in your budget than those purchased out of season. Whether you want to grow your own fresh produce in your backyard, stop by a farmers market, or shop at your local grocery or co-op, the following hints and tips lead you to the freshest produce and where to find it.

    Summer Produce

    For health, quality, and cost
    By Brooke Holmgren
  • Shallot Butter

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    Ingredients:

    4 tablespoons butter, room temperature

    1 tablespoon minced shallots

    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

    Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

    Cream ingredients together and refrigerate until needed. Use on bread, potatoes, lobster, or anything you’d like!

  • Sautéed Mushrooms with Herbs

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    Ingredients:

    ½ pound mushrooms

    1 tablespoon vegetable oil

    2 tablespoons butter

    1 shallot

    1 to 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

    1 tablespoon chopped tarragon or chives

    Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

    Heat oil, butter in skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms, salt, and pepper. Sauté for 3 minutes. Raise heat to high and sauté for 2 additional minutes. When liquid has almost evaporated, add shallots and sauté for 1 to 2 more minutes. Add parsley and tarragon or chives. Season to taste.

  • Green Beans with Caramelized Shallots

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    Ingredients:

    2 pounds slender green beans, trimmed

    1 pound medium shallots

    2 tablespoons butter

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    ¼ teaspoon dried thyme

    Cook beans in salted water until tender. Drain and transfer to cold water. Cut shallots lengthwise in half and remove peel. Melt butter and oil in skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallots and sauté for 1 minute. Reduce heat to medium-low. When shallots are browned and tender, season with thyme, salt, and pepper. Mix beans and shallots together; heat and serve.

  • Not-So-Scary Treats

    With Halloween just around the corner, parents can only imagine what kind of junk will fill their little ghouls’ goodie bags. We’re talking artificial flavors and colors, nasty GMOs, and scads of high-fructose corn syrup.

  • Butternut Squash Soup With Apple and Bacon

    [title]

    8 strips of bacon, cut into pieces
    2 pounds squash, diced
    1 Granny Smith apple, diced
    1 tablespoon sage, finely chopped
    1 teaspoon kosher salt
    1/2 teaspoon pepper
    4 cups low-salt chicken or vegetable broth

    1. Cook bacon until crisp; cut into pieces.

    2. Add diced squash to a large stockpot; cook until browned. Stir in apple, sage, kosher salt, pepper, and broth.

    3. Bring to a boil; simmer until squash and apple soften.

    4. Add half the bacon to soup; puree. Reheat soup and garnish with remaining bacon.

  • In Season: Fiddleheads

    Although the term fiddlehead describes all coiled ferns as they break through the soil, unfurled ostrich ferns are the type we most often eat. With a flavor that resembles artichokes, asparagus, and mushrooms, fiddleheads are packed with niacin, potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin A, which promotes healthy eyes and immune systems.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • In Season: Sunchokes

    Also called Jerusalem artichokes—although they’re not from the Holy Land and are nothing like artichokes—sunchokes resemble portly ginger covered in bumps. But what these small tubers lack in aesthetics, they make up for with a bright flavor reminiscent of jicama and water chestnuts with a whisper of apple.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD