In Season

  • In Season: Bok Choy

    Bok choy (Brassica rapa), a member of the cabbage family, has been cultivated by the Chinese for 5,000 years. According to Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s ANDI scores, bok choy (also known as Chinese cabbage) is the fifth-most nutritious food in the world.

  • In Season: Arugula

    Whether you know it as garden rocket, salad rocket, roquette, or arugula, this spicy little leafy green veggie botanists call Eruca sativa has many names. Arugula resembles a small-leaved open lettuce and is in the same family as kale, mustard greens, and cauliflower.

  • In Season: Lemons

    Lemons are poised to step into the spotlight this year, and the Eureka/Lisbon, Meyer, and seedless varieties are all in season now. Lemons originated in Southeast Asia and entered Europe via Southern Italy during the time of ancient Rome. Christopher Columbus introduced lemons to the West when he brought them to Hispaniola (modern Haiti) in 1493.

  • Sweet and Savory Root Vegetable Stew

    Weekly Recipe: 
    Weekly
    [title]
    SERVES: 6 TO 8

    1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

    6 shallots, diced

    2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger

    2 parsnips, peeled and diced

    2 medium rutabagas, peeled and diced

    2 turnips, peeled and diced

    2 sweet potatoes, peeled and diced

    1 celeriac (celery root), peeled and diced

    1 fennel bulb, halved, cored, and diced (save fronds for garnish)

    1 cinnamon stick

    Vegetable stock

    Ume plum vinegar

    In large pot over medium heat, sauté shallots and ginger in oil five minutes or until soft. Add parsnips, rutabagas, turnips, sweet potatoes, celery root, fennel, and cinnamon stick. Add enough stock to barely cover vegetables, bring to boil, cover, reduce heat, and simmer 25 minutes. Remove from heat, discard cinnamon stick, and gently purée soup three seconds using handheld blender to slightly thicken liquid and blend flavors. Season to taste with a few dashes of vinegar, garnish with fennel fronds, and serve. Source: Clean Food by Terry Walters, image by Gentl and Hyers, courtesy of Sterling Epicure

  • In Season: Sweet Potatoes

    Sweet potatoes have long been a very tasty November staple … but did you know they are a superfood? One of nature’s best sources of beta-carotene, a single cup provides 438 percent of our daily vitamin A needs with a modest 102 calories. To get the full benefit of the beta-carotene, it’s important to have a little fat at the same time … butter anyone?

  • In Season: Celeriac

    Hailed by some as the world’s ugliest vegetable, this homely root is a perfect fall and winter non-starch alternative to potatoes. Delicious, hearty, and durable in storage, this veggie is a perennial favorite in the UK—high time for another British Invasion.

  • In Season: Zucchini

    Though it is treated like a vegetable, zucchini is actually the fruit of the zucchini flower. Ripe in late summer, zucchinis are notoriously prolific. When shopping for them, look for smaller, younger zucchini, typically less than eight inches long. (Zucchini can grow to three feet, but they become fibrous at that size.) They should be firm and heavy with bright, glossy skins.

  • Finding Your Inner Locavore

    During the summer months people emerge from their homes in search of fresh air and local organic foods—and what better way to get both than at your neighborhood farmers’ market? Not only will you reap the many rewards of walking around in the outdoors, but the market will provide local produce, fresh flowers, music, meat, and dairy products.

  • In Season: Beets

    The beet, part of the Chenopodiaceae family, shows a number of health benefits not available in other food families. Betalains are the phytonutrients that give beets their distinctive red color—they provide beet eaters with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification support. While beets have a hard crunchy, rough-looking exterior, once cooked they become soft and buttery.

  • In Season: Strawberries

    Strawberries are one of summer’s most beloved fruits, hitting peak season from April to July. The wild strawberry has existed for over 2,000 years. Now there are over 600 varieties, all differing in flavor, size, and texture. The most commonly cultivated species is Fragaria ananassa.