Nutrition

  • Full-Fat vs. Low-Fat Fare

    Three Times To Go Low:
    1. You’ve got cancer in your family. A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that women who limited their fat intake to 24 percent of their total daily calories were 40 percent less likely to develop ovarian cancer than women who got approximately 39 percent of their daily calories from fat.

    By Gina Roberts-Grey
  • New reason to Lay Off Red Meat

    Turns out smoking isn’t your only risk factor when it comes to lung disease. A study of more than 500,000 people age 50 to 71 found a link between eating red meat and this type of cancer. The study also associated red-meat intake with an elevated risk for cancers of the esophagus and liver. Why?

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Get Them Hooked on Veggies Young

    If children are going to learn to love vegetables and other good-for-you foods, it’s important to expose them to healthy fare early on. How early? Starting in utero and continuing through breast-feeding, says new research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • For Grade-A Smarts, Try Vitamin A

    Ever wonder why Bugs Bunny always outsmarts Elmer Fudd? Chalk it up to the carrots he eats. Researchers at Harvard University conducted long-term studies on nearly 6,000 men and found that those who supplemented daily with 50 mg of beta-carotene (which your body converts to vitamin A) had significantly better memory, cognitive function, and verbal recognition than those who took a placebo.

    By Gina Roberts-Grey
  • Drundruff Woes

    First, steer clear of traditional shampoos and conditioners, which can contain dandruff-causing chemicals like sodium lauryl sulfate and parabens, says Lisa Frost, licensed aesthetician at Pharmaca Integrated Pharmacy.

    What is the best way to cure dandruff?
  • Water Works

    Sure, a cup of hot cocoa is the perfect post-sledding, skating, or skiing drink—but it’s important to remind your kids they need water, too, says Brooke de Lench, author of Home Team Advantage (HarperCollins, 2006).

    By Nicole Duncan
  • A Change of Heart

    Ever since the 1950s, when the Framingham Heart Study established a correlation between high cholesterol and heart attacks, doctors have focused on lowering cholesterol as a way to prevent heart disease. For years they’ve told us to accomplish this by eating a low-fat diet and exercising and, if that failed, by taking cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins.

    A new wave of doctors is relvolutionizing the way Western medicine prevents and treats heart disease. Here's what you need to know to keep your heart healthy for many beats to come.
    By James Keough
  • Bar Exam

    Energy bars are perfect for your on-the-go nutrition needs. But choosing just the right one can be an overwhelming proposition, especially when most gimmicky “energy bars” come stuffed with refined sugars and other processed ingredients.

    Energy snacks that pass the "good-for-you" test.
    By Nicole Duncan
  • Inside Scoop: Trans Fat Replacements


    Labeling loophole

    The rush to remove trans fats from fried, baked, and processed goods has never been more frantic. Even Dunkin’ Donuts and the Indiana State Fair have promised to use healthier frying oils. But are the “heart-healthy” changes everything they seem?
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Greens On the Go

    Sure, you eat well. You choose fruit for snacks, fish instead of burgers. But what about dark green vegetables? Most busy Americans consume less than a quarter of a serving a day. The main obstacles? We say they’re harder to eat on the go and more time-consuming to prepare. Well, put your excuses aside. You can up your veggie intake fast—and on the go—with green drinks.

    Easy to tote, yummy to drink