Nutrition

  • Move Over, Crudite

    New research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that cooking some veggies boosts nutrient levels. The study, which compared broccoli, carrots, and zucchini, found that boiling, steaming, and even frying actually increases the levels of certain groups of antioxidants.

    By Scott Boulbol
  • Ask The Doctor: Iron for Infants

    Not at all. Iron plays a vital role in your baby’s health by helping make hemoglobin, a complex protein that ferries oxygen around the body. Low levels of iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia, which can cause developmental problems.

    I’m worried about whether my infant gets enough iron. Am I just being paranoid?
    By Roy Steinbock, MD
  • A Tune-up for Your Thyroid

    The thyroid, a small, butterfly-shaped gland below your Adam’s apple, pretty much rules your body, says Douglas Husbands, DC, CCN, a clinical nutritionist and chiropractor in San Carlos, California.

    This little gland plays a big role in your body. Keep it running with these essentials.
    By Victoria Dolby Toews
  • The Well-Stocked Kitchen

    Each year, Americans spend an estimated $46 billion on diet products and self-help books. We fill our grocery carts with the foods these plans claim will help us lose weight and keep it off. And what does that mean for so many of us? We’ve got a pantry full of our best intentions and no clue what to do with them.

    Must-have foods for your panty, fridge, and freezer. And how to use them.
  • Slim Down Before Summer

    Diet downfall #1
    You don’t really have a plan. “We’re constantly bombarded with new, trendy diets—but most of us get confused by all the mixed messages and don’t really follow just one plan,” says Rubin.

    Jordan Rubin, author of Perfect Weight America (Siloam, 2008), shares three reasons diets often fail—and simple fixes that can help you stay on track.
    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Walk Off That Sugar

    Couch potatoes take note, especially those with type-2 diabetes—exercise may be the best way to manage your blood sugar. So what’s new about that? Anyone diagnosed with diabetes knows (or at least has been told) to lose weight, watch what they eat, quit smoking, and get regular exercise. But those same people will tell you how hard it is to make all those changes simultaneously.

  • Get Them Hooked on Veggies Young

    If children are going to learn to love vegetables and other good-for-you foods, it’s important to expose them to healthy fare early on. How early? Starting in utero and continuing through breast-feeding, says new research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • New Ways to a Healthy Heart

    Cardiovascular disease caused more than one third of all deaths in the US in 2004, making it the nation’s No. 1 killer. Confronted with that grim statistic, one could venture we’ve been missing something. Two new studies suggest what that might be—fruits and vegetables full of vitamin C and a daily dose of sunshine.

    By Kris Kucera
  • Full-Fat vs. Low-Fat Fare

    Three Times To Go Low:
    1. You’ve got cancer in your family. A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that women who limited their fat intake to 24 percent of their total daily calories were 40 percent less likely to develop ovarian cancer than women who got approximately 39 percent of their daily calories from fat.

    By Gina Roberts-Grey
  • New reason to Lay Off Red Meat

    Turns out smoking isn’t your only risk factor when it comes to lung disease. A study of more than 500,000 people age 50 to 71 found a link between eating red meat and this type of cancer. The study also associated red-meat intake with an elevated risk for cancers of the esophagus and liver. Why?

    By Meghan Rabbitt