Nutrition

  • Slim Down Before Summer

    Diet downfall #1
    You don’t really have a plan. “We’re constantly bombarded with new, trendy diets—but most of us get confused by all the mixed messages and don’t really follow just one plan,” says Rubin.

    Jordan Rubin, author of Perfect Weight America (Siloam, 2008), shares three reasons diets often fail—and simple fixes that can help you stay on track.
    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Walk Off That Sugar

    Couch potatoes take note, especially those with type-2 diabetes—exercise may be the best way to manage your blood sugar. So what’s new about that? Anyone diagnosed with diabetes knows (or at least has been told) to lose weight, watch what they eat, quit smoking, and get regular exercise. But those same people will tell you how hard it is to make all those changes simultaneously.

  • New Ways to a Healthy Heart

    Cardiovascular disease caused more than one third of all deaths in the US in 2004, making it the nation’s No. 1 killer. Confronted with that grim statistic, one could venture we’ve been missing something. Two new studies suggest what that might be—fruits and vegetables full of vitamin C and a daily dose of sunshine.

    By Kris Kucera
  • New reason to Lay Off Red Meat

    Turns out smoking isn’t your only risk factor when it comes to lung disease. A study of more than 500,000 people age 50 to 71 found a link between eating red meat and this type of cancer. The study also associated red-meat intake with an elevated risk for cancers of the esophagus and liver. Why?

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Full-Fat vs. Low-Fat Fare

    Three Times To Go Low:
    1. You’ve got cancer in your family. A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that women who limited their fat intake to 24 percent of their total daily calories were 40 percent less likely to develop ovarian cancer than women who got approximately 39 percent of their daily calories from fat.

    By Gina Roberts-Grey
  • Berry Good for You

    Long touted for their effectiveness in treating urinary tract infections, cranberries can now lay claim to even more bacteria-fighting prowess. Researchers at Massachusetts’ Worcester Polytechnic Institute have found that certain cranberry compounds alter E.

  • Get Them Hooked on Veggies Young

    If children are going to learn to love vegetables and other good-for-you foods, it’s important to expose them to healthy fare early on. How early? Starting in utero and continuing through breast-feeding, says new research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Drundruff Woes

    First, steer clear of traditional shampoos and conditioners, which can contain dandruff-causing chemicals like sodium lauryl sulfate and parabens, says Lisa Frost, licensed aesthetician at Pharmaca Integrated Pharmacy.

    What is the best way to cure dandruff?
  • For Grade-A Smarts, Try Vitamin A

    Ever wonder why Bugs Bunny always outsmarts Elmer Fudd? Chalk it up to the carrots he eats. Researchers at Harvard University conducted long-term studies on nearly 6,000 men and found that those who supplemented daily with 50 mg of beta-carotene (which your body converts to vitamin A) had significantly better memory, cognitive function, and verbal recognition than those who took a placebo.

    By Gina Roberts-Grey
  • A Change of Heart

    Ever since the 1950s, when the Framingham Heart Study established a correlation between high cholesterol and heart attacks, doctors have focused on lowering cholesterol as a way to prevent heart disease. For years they’ve told us to accomplish this by eating a low-fat diet and exercising and, if that failed, by taking cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins.

    A new wave of doctors is relvolutionizing the way Western medicine prevents and treats heart disease. Here's what you need to know to keep your heart healthy for many beats to come.
    By James Keough