Nutrition

  • Spiced Nut and Seed Mix

    1 tablespoon melted butter
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 tablespoon agave nectar
    1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
    1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
    1/8 teaspoon cayenne
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup walnuts
    1 cup almonds
    1/2 cup pumpkinseeds
    1/4 cup sunflower seeds
    2 tablespoons flaxseeds

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. In a medium saucepan, combine butter, olive oil, agave, and spices. Cook on low heat for one minute. Add nuts and seeds; coat well.
    3. Spread in a single layer on baking sheet. Roast 5 minutes, or until nuts are golden.

    nutrition info: 203.4 calories; 17.7 g fat; 2.3 g saturated fat; 3.1 mg cholesterol; 5.9 g protein;
    8.5 g carbohydrates; 3.4 g fiber; 118.9 mg sodium

  • The 2009 Get Healthy & Stay Healthy Guide

    We’ve all heard the same advice a million times, no matter what our health concerns: Eat better, exercise more, and stress less. But why is that so hard for many of us to do?

    While most nutritionists and doctors tell us to eat plenty of fruits, veggies, whole grains, and spices—they don’t really explain how we can do that in three meals a day.

    By Lindsay Wilson, Nicole Duncan, Erin Quinn, Kate Hanley
  • Eat to Beat the Blues

    Ever wonder why you can’t resist the urge to overdo it on unhealthy foods when you’re feeling down? Turns out there’s a physiological reason we eat too much bread, ice cream, and other “comfort” foods when we’re depressed: The sugar and carbs they typically contain give us a mental and physical lift.

    36 foods to stave off— and cure—depression.
    By Lisa Turner
  • Natural Ways to Turn Down the Heat

    The holidays are always a good excuse to indulge in unhealthy foods—so it’s no surprise that a recent survey from The National Heartburn Alliance found that 37 percent of adults say they’re more likely to suffer from heartburn during this season than any other time of year.

    By Celia Shatzman
  • Poached Salmon Over Spinach With Mango Salsa

    1 cup fresh or frozen and thawed mango cubes
    1 Serrano chile, seeded and minced
    1/2 cup red onion, diced
    1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
    Juice of 1/2 lime
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    4 6-ounce salmon fillets
    4 teaspoons low-sodium
    Soy sauce
    4 large garlic cloves, minced
    1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    1 10-ounce bag baby
    Spinach leaves

    1. To make salsa, in a medium bowl combine mango, chile, onion, cilantro, and lime; stir to mix. Season with salt and pepper, and set aside.

    2. In a large skillet, heat olive oil. Place salmon fillets, flesh side down, in a skillet and cook for 1 minute, or until lightly browned. Turn fillets over and place in skillet, skin side down. Sprinkle fish with soy sauce, garlic, and red pepper flakes. Add 1/2 inch of water to skillet, cover, and cook on medium until fish is opaque, 6 to 10 minutes.

    3. Remove fish from the skillet and increase heat to medium-high. Add spinach to the skillet and cook for 1 minute, or until just wilted. Remove spinach and divide among four individual plates. Top each plate with a salmon fillet; garnish with salsa.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 366 calories; 18 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 92 mg cholesterol; 37 g protein; 15 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 311 mg sodium

     

  • Go Nuts

    Turns out it might not be an apple a day that keeps the doc away: A new study in the Journal of Nutrition reports that eating a handful of nuts five or more times a week can reduce your risk of developing heart disease. Reach for almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, and walnuts, says Sari Greaves, RD, a nutritionist in Bedminster, New Jersey.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Focus On Food: Children's Nutrition

    Through his work as an associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, William Sears, MD, has found that as many as 50 percent of the kids who get diagnosed with ADD or ADHD also have poor nutrition. Sears believes they actually suffer from what he calls Nutrition Deficiency Disorder (NDD).

    By Nora Simmons
  • Magic Mushrooms

    Unlike the kind you heard about in college, the chemicals in these ’shrooms won’t give you special powers—or get you arrested for that matter—but they are creating quite a buzz. Developed in Japan in the mid 1980s, active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is produced from the fermented extract of a hybrid of several medicinal mushrooms.

    By Nora Simmons
  • The Immune-Boosting Diet

    Everyone’s always sayingwhat an amazingly efficient immune system we have, but if that’s so true, why do we catch colds in the winter or suffer from allergies in the spring? The answer lies in ourselves. We don’t keep our immune system in fighting trim. Instead, we do all sorts of things that make it weak in the knees.

    9 foods to help you stay well all season long
    By Wendy McMillan
  • Too Much Sugar? Cut the Salt

    American teens drink an average of two 12-ounce soft drinks every day, which makes up 43 percent of their daily recommended intake of sugar. What’s worse, these same kids get one-third of their daily calories from nutrient-poor snack foods loaded with sodium, preservatives—and more sugar. A recent study suggests you may be able to kill both of these bad-food birds with one stone.

    By Lisa Marshall