Nutrition

  • Splenda Makes You Fat

    What you stir into your morning cup of java may be increasing your waistline and creating a digestive imbalance. A small study published in the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health suggests that consuming Splenda—even within the limits set by the FDA—decreases healthy intestinal flora and causes weight gain.

    By Nora Simmons
  • I Heart Garlic

    This Valentine’s Day don’t let the prospect of smooch-repelling garlic breath keep you from protecting your heart. Garlic, specifically a compound called allicin, helps control high blood pressure (aka hypertension)—a dangerous condition that afflicts one in five Americans and increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Egg-cellent News for Dieters

    Before you start yet another diet du jour, consider this: Eating two eggs a day for breakfast helps you lose 65 percent more weight and gain more energy than a bagel of equal calories, says a recent study from the International Journal of Obesity.

    By Nicole Sprinkle
  • Trans Fats Linked to Colon Cancer

    If saving your heart isn’t reason enough to avoid trans fats, how about keeping your colon healthy? New research from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill links high trans-fat intake with increased growth of polyps that can lead to colorectal cancer.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Good Reason to Get More Greens

    Red produce like apples and peppers have gotten a lot of buzz lately thanks to their antioxidant-packed nutrition profiles, but that doesn’t mean you should give up your green veggies—especially if you worry about memory loss. A new study from the University of Illinois reports that celery and green peppers may prevent Alzheimer’s.

    By Nicole Ducnan
  • Cool Beans

    You know how that school-yard rhyme goes: Beans, beans, they’re good for your heart. But Donna M. Winham, a nutrition professor at Arizona State University who has conducted extensive research on beans’ impact on overall health, says this nutritious food protects more than your ticker.

    7 beans that prove good things do come in small packages
    By Wendy McMillan
  • Fishy Findings

    If you favor fish in your diet for its health-boosting omega-3s, you need to take a hard look at where your fillets come from before you choose them.

    By Erinn Morgan
  • Seeds of Health

    Seeds contain nearly everything they need to start a new life: the embryo of a plant, the nutrients to sustain it, and a coat of armor to protect it. Small wonder then that they can add significant nutritional bang for the bite.

    These pods of new life can restore vitality to yours.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Chickpea and Red Pepper Salad With Lemon-Garlic Dressing

    1/2 cup silken tofu
    1/4 cup olive oil
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1 small garlic clove, pressed
    1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons
    fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped
    4 cups mesclun mix
    4 cups arugula
    1 15-ounce can chickpeas
    1 small red pepper, cored and
    cut into thin strips
    1/2 small red onion, very thinly sliced
    1/2 cup black olives
    1/2 cup almonds
    Additional whole basil leaves for garnish

    1. To make dressing, combine tofu, olive oil and lemon juice in a blender, and puree until smooth and creamy. Add garlic and puree again for 5 seconds. Add 2 tablespoons of the basil leaves and pulse briefly to combine, leaving some visible pieces of basil. Set aside.
    2. In a medium salad bowl, combine mesclun mix, arugula, remaining basil, chickpeas, red pepper, and onion. Add just enough dressing to very lightly coat, and toss to mix. Divide salad among four individual plates and top each with olives and almonds. Garnish with additional basil leaves, if desired, and serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 387 calories; 26.1 g fat; 2.9 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 11.7 g protein; 30.2 g carbohydrates; 7.8 g fiber; 433.8 mg sodium

  • Warm Artichoke and Crab Dip

    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 red bell pepper, finely chopped
    3 medium garlic cloves, crushed
    1 15-ounce can artichoke hearts, chopped
    1 small Serrano chile, seeded and finely minced
    6 scallions, thinly sliced (include some green tops)
    1/2 cup Montrachet, or other creamy goat cheese
    1/2 pound jumbo lump crabmeat, picked over
    1/4 cup grated Asiago cheese
    1/4 cup finely chopped raw walnuts

    1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

    2. In a medium saucepan, heat olive oil and sauté red pepper and garlic until red pepper is tender. Remove from heat and stir in artichokes, Serrano chile, scallions, and goat cheese. Gently fold in crabmeat.

    3. Transfer to a lightly oiled baking dish. Sprinkle with grated Asiago and walnuts. Bake on middle rack about 20 minutes.

    4. Remove from oven and serve warm, with sliced whole-grain baguette or crackers.

    nutrition info per serving (6 to 8): 210.4 calories; 15.3 g fat; 4.8 g saturated fat; 21.1 mg cholesterol; 9.4 g protein; 10.6 g carbohydrates; 3.6 g fiber; 296.8 mg sodium