Nutrition

  • Build A Better Salad

    Want to boost brain health or eat to beat cancer? Make yourself a salad. Beth Reardon, RD, LDN, at Duke Integrative Medicine, helps you customize your greens.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Worth Their Salt

    Few dishes would be complete without a sprinkle of salt. A shake or two can bring out the natural flavor of foods during cooking, and a flourish of coarsely ground salt adds a slightly crunchy flair to any meal.

    7 artisian varieties that add flavor and a health boost to a range of meals
    By Lisa Turner
  • Sleep Saboteurs

    If you’re among the estimated 65 percent of Americans who have trouble sleeping at least a few nights a week, you’re probably tired of hearing about all the possible culprits for your bedtime woes, from too much caffeine and late-night TV to not enough exercise or unwind time in the evenings.

    What to eat and what to avoid to put insomnia to rest.
    By Monica Bhide
  • Delete This Additive

    Next time you crave a frozen pizza, scan the ingredients first for compounds known as inorganic phosphates (Pi). Common in packaged foods, these additives, which manufacturers use to retain water and improve texture, can harm your lungs, brain, liver, and teeth when eaten regularly—and may also cause or aggravate ADD/ADHD in your children.

    By Kyle Bradley
  • Go Bananas

    An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but if you want to avoid the cardiologist, reach for a banana. Research presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s 41st Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in November linked low dietary potassium with high blood pressure in an analysis of more than 3,300 people.

    By Beth Bence Reinke
  • I Heart Garlic

    This Valentine’s Day don’t let the prospect of smooch-repelling garlic breath keep you from protecting your heart. Garlic, specifically a compound called allicin, helps control high blood pressure (aka hypertension)—a dangerous condition that afflicts one in five Americans and increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Splenda Makes You Fat

    What you stir into your morning cup of java may be increasing your waistline and creating a digestive imbalance. A small study published in the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health suggests that consuming Splenda—even within the limits set by the FDA—decreases healthy intestinal flora and causes weight gain.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Grapefruit for Hepatitis C

    Cutting edge research suggests that naringenin—the metabolized form of the natural flavonoid naringin, which gives grapefruit its bitter taste—may curb the spread of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) by up to 80 percent.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Cool Beans

    You know how that school-yard rhyme goes: Beans, beans, they’re good for your heart. But Donna M. Winham, a nutrition professor at Arizona State University who has conducted extensive research on beans’ impact on overall health, says this nutritious food protects more than your ticker.

    7 beans that prove good things do come in small packages
    By Wendy McMillan
  • Trans Fats Linked to Colon Cancer

    If saving your heart isn’t reason enough to avoid trans fats, how about keeping your colon healthy? New research from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill links high trans-fat intake with increased growth of polyps that can lead to colorectal cancer.

    By Nora Simmons