Nutrition

  • Does Your Diet Need A Makeover?


    Shopping List

    Whether you want to drop a few pounds, lower your risk of heart disease, or decrease pain and inflammation in your body, certain foods can help you reach these goals. Here are the ones to add to your shopping list.
    Nicole Egenberger, ND
  • The Beauty of Wine

    You cheered when news broke that a glass of red wine a day is actually good for your heart. Turns out it’s not just imbibing the stuff (in moderation, of course) that may have health benefits.

    Reasons to toast vino's rejuvenating powers.
    by O'Rya Hyde-Keller
  • The Calcium Myth

    We’ve been told all our lives to drink milk for strong bones. Many of us even feel guilty when we don’t get the recommended three servings of dairy each day. In fact, we’ve been led to believe that we have a “calcium crisis” in the United States because so many of us don’t get enough dairy. The proposed solution?

    The nation’s leading health experts insist that we drink plenty of milk and take calcium supplements to protect our bones. What if they’re wrong?
    By Michael Castleman
  • Toxin Alert: Not-So-Sweet Treats

    Turns out high-fructose corn syrup can mess with more than just your waistline. A recent study published in the journal Environmental Health found this widely used sweetener often contains traces of mercury, a toxic metal that interferes with the brain and nervous system and causes a host of health problems, particularly for children and pregnant women.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • So Long, Sugar!

    Ousting the sweet stuff from your diet can temper a litany of health complaints, from high cholesterol to digestive woes. But don’t go cold turkey—that can lead to lethargy, headaches, and mood swings—especially if you have a serious sweet tooth. To help you go sugar free without the side effects:

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Combat Your Food Cravings

    Finish a meal and go straight for the cookie jar? Have to drink a soda with dinner? Arizona-based naturopath Colleen Huber says all food cravings are really your body trying to tell you it needs more of certain minerals. Here are clues to what your food cravings could be trying to tell you—and how to satisfy them the healthy way.
     

  • Delete This Additive

    Next time you crave a frozen pizza, scan the ingredients first for compounds known as inorganic phosphates (Pi). Common in packaged foods, these additives, which manufacturers use to retain water and improve texture, can harm your lungs, brain, liver, and teeth when eaten regularly—and may also cause or aggravate ADD/ADHD in your children.

    By Kyle Bradley
  • Sleep Saboteurs

    If you’re among the estimated 65 percent of Americans who have trouble sleeping at least a few nights a week, you’re probably tired of hearing about all the possible culprits for your bedtime woes, from too much caffeine and late-night TV to not enough exercise or unwind time in the evenings.

    What to eat and what to avoid to put insomnia to rest.
    By Monica Bhide
  • Worth Their Salt

    Few dishes would be complete without a sprinkle of salt. A shake or two can bring out the natural flavor of foods during cooking, and a flourish of coarsely ground salt adds a slightly crunchy flair to any meal.

    7 artisian varieties that add flavor and a health boost to a range of meals
    By Lisa Turner
  • Build A Better Salad

    Want to boost brain health or eat to beat cancer? Make yourself a salad. Beth Reardon, RD, LDN, at Duke Integrative Medicine, helps you customize your greens.

    By Nicole Duncan