Nutrition

  • In Season: Sour Cherries

    Cherry pie lovers, your time is now. Ideal-for-baking sour cherries, including Morello, Montmorency, and Early Richmond varieties, have super-short growing seasons, making them available for only a few weeks in June and July.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Welcome Back, White Fish

    Oily swimmers like salmon and sardines tend to get all the health credit for their high doses of omega-3 fatty acids, but consuming any type of fish may be better than eating none, at least for diabetics.

    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Crab Salad With Avocado, Apple, and Green Beans

    1 1/2 cups green beans, trimmed at both ends, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    2 tablespoons coarse sea salt
    1 cup Greek–style yogurt
    1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
    1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
    4 tablespoons minced fresh chives
    1 Granny Smith apple, peeled and cubed
    1 ripe avocado, peeled and cubed
    8 ounces cooked lump crabmeat (about 1 cup)

    1. Fill a large pot fitted with a colander with water. Bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Add green beans and coarse sea salt to colander, and cook until tender, 3 to 4 minutes.

    2. Remove colander from pot. Rinse beans with cold water, drain, and pat dry with a clean towel.

    3. Whisk yogurt, mustard, and fine sea salt in a large, shallow bowl. Add green beans, chives, apple, avocado, and crabmeat. Toss and serve.

    nutrition info per serving: 220 calories; 9 g fat; 38 mg cholesterol; 20 g protein; 17 g carbohydrates; 5 g fiber; 610 mg sodium

  • Eat to Look Young

    Aging provides plenty of perks—greater confidence, more wisdom, and discounted movie tickets, to name a few. But growing older also brings a few downsides: age spots, for instance, which boldly advertise your senior status.

    Prevent wrinkles with these 9 foods.
    By Wendy McMillan
  • In Season: Fiddleheads

    Although the term fiddlehead describes all coiled ferns as they break through the soil, unfurled ostrich ferns are the type we most often eat. With a flavor that resembles artichokes, asparagus, and mushrooms, fiddleheads are packed with niacin, potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin A, which promotes healthy eyes and immune systems.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • The Coconut Oil Controversy

    Few foods stump nutritionists more than coconut oil. Enthusiasts credit the serum with preventing heart disease, speeding weight loss, and bolstering immune function, but government guidelines and some nutritionists continue to warn against saturated fat—including the 91 percent saturated fat in coconut oil.

    By Melanie Warner
  • Health By Chocolate

    If you think steamed spinach is the most mouthwatering health food, you may want to reconsider. A candy bar’s worth of dark chocolate, or 100 grams, has just as many antioxidants as 100 grams each of spinach, prunes, raisins, kale, and Brussels sprouts, combined.

    Cacao is the new broccoli. Find out why.
    By Emily Stone
  • Hungry Eyes

    Most of us expect—and accept—the slow deterioration of our eyesight as an inevitable part of aging. But is it? A wealth of research indicates that protecting our baby blues (or browns or greens) could be as simple as eating the right foods or choosing targeted supplements.

    Get these nutrients now for better vision as you age.
    By Erinn Morgan
  • The Acid-Alkaline Diet

    You had low-fat yogurt, mango, and a cup of black tea with honey for breakfast. Lunch was a turkey-breast sandwich, and you snacked on grapes and organic peanuts. You’re trying to eat healthy, so why don’t you feel healthy? Why are you fatigued, sick, or unable to lose those last 10 pounds?

    Balancing your body's pH for better health
    By Lisa Turner
  • The Blood Type Diet

    Fad diets come and go as assuredly as the seasons. But when a nutritional approach persists for more than several years, chances are it has dietary merit—or, at the very least, warrants a little investigating.

    Designed just for you
    By Khyber Oser