Healthy Alternatives

  • Spot of Tea for Stress

    When the going gets tough, the tough get brewing, a notion legions of tea-loving Brits have subscribed to for centuries. Now, a City University of London study shows that putting a kettle on the stove and sipping tea in times of crisis or unrest can reduce stress—and even make you feel calmer than before the trauma.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • The Blood Type Diet

    Fad diets come and go as assuredly as the seasons. But when a nutritional approach persists for more than several years, chances are it has dietary merit—or, at the very least, warrants a little investigating.

    Designed just for you
    By Khyber Oser
  • Hot Stuff

    Whether fresh, dried, ground, or roasted, chili peppers add unrivaled pop to meals while delivering countless medicinal benefits to the body. Capsaicin, the compound responsible for chilies’ pungency and spice, has been credited with a host of health advantages, from killing cancerous cells to lowering blood pressure, preventing obesity, and reducing the risk of diabetes.

    How peppers can fire up your health.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Chai

    3 cups water
    1 tablespoon cardamom pods and seeds (about 15)
    1 teaspoon whole cloves
    1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
    2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced (or more to taste)
    2 cinnamon sticks
    1/4 teaspoon fennel seed
    4 teaspoons Assam black
    tea leaves
    1 1/2 cups milk
    Raw honey

    1. In a saucepan, bring water and spices to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 15 minutes.
    2. Remove from heat, add tea, and steep for 8 minutes.
    3. Strain the tea, discarding the leaves and spices, and return tea to the saucepan. Add milk and heat through. Serve with raw honey to taste.
    Note: If you’re caffeine-sensitive, opt for decaf rooibos tea leaves, or omit the tea altogether and have spiced milk.
    nutrition info per serving (using 2% milk)

    50 calories; 1.9 g fat; 1.2 g saturated fat; 7.3 mg cholesterol; 3.1 g protein; 5.3 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 37.8 mg sodium

  • Spice Up the Season

    Feel guilty sipping eggnog or munching on gingersnaps? These holiday goodies may not be as bad as you think. Some of the most commonly used spices in traditional treats can reduce inflammation, lower your risk of heart disease, and more, says Sarah Krieger, RD, national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

    By Celia Shatzman
  • Cold School

    We know: You thought you’d be safe from cold and flu season this year. You ate your immune-boosting sweet potatoes, got plenty of sleep, and hit the echinacea at the first sign of a scratchy throat.

    By Brooke Benjamin
  • Better 'Wich Craft

    You already know to steer clear of deli meats, which are loaded with sodium, saturated fat, and cancer-causing nitrates. But just because a ham-and-havarti isn’t the healthiest choice doesn’t mean you have to forsake sandwiches altogether. Here’s how to build a better sandwich, based on what you need:

    For post-workout power …

    By Allison Young
  • Got (Non-Dairy) Milk?

    As the mustached celebrities in those milk ads tell us, milk does a body good thanks to its calcium, vitamin D, and other nutrients. But what if you’re lactose intolerant, vegan, or simply not a fan of cow’s milk? You have plenty of nondairy options—from the more common ones like soy and rice milks to the nut, oat, and even hemp varieties.

    By Erin Quinn
  • King of the Soups

    Chicken soup not only soothes your soul, it can lower your blood pressure, clear nasal clog, reduce inflammation—and even help you lose weight. (Is this a perfect food or what?) Research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry revealed that the collagen proteins in chicken produced a significant and prolonged decrease in blood pressure (at least in rats).

    By Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen
  • The Scary Truth About Statins

    The notion that high cholesterol causes heart disease has allowed doctors to write millions of prescriptions for cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins that can reduce the risk of it. That seemingly indisputable notion has long suffered from an inconvenient fact: Half the people who have a heart attack don’t have high cholesterol.

    What you need to know before you fill that prescription
    By Erin Quinn