Healthy Alternatives

  • Rainforest Superfoods: The Açai Story

    The Amazon Rainforest is home to millions of beautiful and unique animals and plants. Often called “the lungs of the planet,” the Amazon Rainforest is just about as large as the continental United States.

    Once in a while, a "new" food is introduced to the western world that causes a bit of a stir.
    By Brooke Holmgren
  • Green Grilling

    Seventy-seven percent of North American households own an outdoor grill, and almost half light up the barbecue twice a week during the summer, according to the Hearth, Patio & Barbeque Association. All that grilling takes a toll on the environment, but you can lessen the impact of your summer cookouts.

    By Jodi Helmer
  • Time to Quit Coffee

    People who drink lots of coffee (5 cups or more per day) are more likely to get headaches, says a new study in The Journal of Headache and Pain. But going cold turkey can mean mood swings, irritability, and (yes) more headaches. Catherine Ziegler, a San Francisco nutritionist, tells us how to kick the coffee habit successfully.

    By Cheryl Meyers
  • On-the-Go Goodness

    If you grew up thinking that nibbling between meals was taboo, chew on this idea: “Snacking helps keep your metabolism fueled, your energy up, and your blood sugar stable,” says Keri Glassman, RD, author of The Snack Factor Diet (Crown, 2007). “Snacks also help you control cravings throughout the day and can improve your mood.”

    Healthy ways to satisfy snack attacks
    By Laurie Budgar
  • Elimination Round

    For more years than she cares to remember, La Vaughn Kemnow, 73, of Chiloquin, Oregon, was plagued by unrelenting stomach ailments—heartburn, bloating, sharp pain—along with extreme mental and physical fatigue. Whatever virus or bug happened to be floating around, Kemnow would catch.

    Identify food intolerances with this easy diet.
    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Health By Chocolate

    If you think steamed spinach is the most mouthwatering health food, you may want to reconsider. A candy bar’s worth of dark chocolate, or 100 grams, has just as many antioxidants as 100 grams each of spinach, prunes, raisins, kale, and Brussels sprouts, combined.

    Cacao is the new broccoli. Find out why.
    By Emily Stone
  • Nausea No More

    When you feel like you’re going to throw up, you’ll try anything to make the sensation go away. But conventional cures like Pepto-Bismol or prescription antinausea medications carry side effects like constipation, headache, and muscle spasms.

    5 herbal remedies to help settle your stomach
    By Nora Simmons
  • Steamed Catfish With Brown Rice

    Ingredients:
    1 cup brown basmati rice
    1 1/2 cups water
    4 6-ounce US-farmed catfish fillets
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
    Parchment paper or aluminum foil
    3 to 4 tablespoons chopped chives
    2 medium carrots, julienned
    2 zucchini, julienned
    2 cups sugar snap peas, ends trimmed

    1. Bring rice and water to a boil in a saucepan. Reduce heat, and simmer for 40 to 45 minutes, or until all the water has absorbed. Do not stir while cooking.

    2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Rinse catfish, and pat dry with a towel. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

    3. Cut out four 20-inch-wide heart-shaped pieces of parchment paper or foil. Place one fillet on each heart shape so that fish sits close to the crease, leaving a 1-inch border around the edges for folding.

    4. Place a quarter of the chives, carrots, zucchini, and peas on each fillet. Seal the packet by folding the edges in small, tight folds. Twist the tip, and tuck underneath.

    5. Place the packets on a large baking sheet (packets may overlap slightly). Cook until the fish is opaque in the center, about 20 minutes. Carefully cut open packets, and place fish and vegetables on a plate. Serve with rice.

    nutrition info per serving: 443 calories; 15 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 80 mg cholesterol; 33 g protein; 44 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 150 mg sodium

  • Falafel With Carrot Tahini Sauce

    Falafel:
    1 1/2 cups dried chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
    2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
    1 shallot, diced
    2 cloves garlic, diced
    1 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
    2 teaspoons cumin powder
    Salt to taste
    1/4 cup brown-rice flour or other gluten-free flour
    1/3 cup raw, shelled sunflower seeds (optional)

    Sauce:
    2 large carrots, peeled and chopped
    1 English cucumber, peeled and chopped
    1 inch of fresh ginger, peeled and diced
    1/3 cup tahini
    1/4 cup unsweetened hemp or rice milk
    1 tablespoon apple-cider vinegar

    1. Place chickpeas in a bowl, and cover with water. Place bowl in refrigerator, and soak for several hours.

    2. Drain beans, and place in a large pot with water so that beans are covered by at least 3 inches. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for about 1 hour, or until beans are tender but not mushy.

    3. Drain beans, and place in a food processor with 1 tablespoon olive oil, shallot, garlic, cilantro, cumin, salt, and flour. Pulse until well combined but still slightly coarse. Mix in sunflower seeds, and remove from processor.

    4. Dampen hands before rolling mixture into meatball-size balls. Flatten balls slightly, and set aside.

    5. To make the sauce, in a clean processor, add the carrots and cucumber, and mince. Add ginger, tahini, milk, and vinegar. Blend until smooth.

     6. In a large skillet, heat remaining oil over medium flame. Cook falafel patties for 4 to 5 minutes per side, or until golden. Serve topped with carrot sauce.

    nutrition info per serving: 517 calories; 22 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 19 g protein; 64 g carbohydrate; 17 g fiber; 97 mg sodium

  • Quinoa Porridge

    1 cup uncooked quinoa
    2 cups water
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1/4 teaspoon nutmeg or allspice
    1/4 teaspoon sea salt
    1 cup unsweetened hemp or rice milk
    1 apple, diced
    1 cup blueberries or other berries
    1/2 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
    Agave syrup (optional)

     

    1. Add quinoa, water, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt to a small pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes, or until most of the water has been absorbed.

    2. Add milk, and simmer uncovered for an additional 10 minutes. Stir in apple, berries, and nuts. Remove from heat.

    3. Let sit covered for 10 minutes while the porridge thickens. Drizzle with agave before serving if desired.

    nutrition info per serving: 307 calories; 14 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 8 g protein; 40 g carbohydrate; 6 g fiber; 159 mg sodium