Healing Foods

  • Get Your Goat

    The glossy mustache advertisements and dancing-cow commercials might try to convince you that bovines have cornered the milk market, but there’s a whole other category in the dairy case that’s got as much—or more—nutritional game: goat’s milk.

    Why it's time to think beyond cow's milk.
    By Jeanette Hurt
  • Shrimp Skewers in Thai Peanut Marinade

    THAI PEANUT MARINADE
    1/4 cup peanut or almond butter
    1/2 cup coconut milk
    1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
    1 small shallot
    2 cloves garlic
    1/2-inch piece ginger, peeled
    2 teaspoons sugar or agave nectar
    1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
    1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
    1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
    Pinch red chili fl akes (optional)
    SKEWERS
    24 prawns, both shelled and
    deveined
    1 (14 ounce) can pineapple chunks
    6 (12-inch) skewers, or 24 toothpicks

    1. Blend sauce ingredients in a food processor until smooth. If making a double batch for dipping, reserve half the sauce. Marinate the prawns in the remaining sauce for 30 minutes, up to eight hours. Stir occasionally.

    2. Heat the grill to medium-high. Slip three shrimp and four pineapple chunks onto each skewer (for appetizers, place one each onto 24 toothpicks). Grill three minutes each side, until shrimp turn pink and pineapple chunks are slightly browned. Remove from heat and serve with the optional remaining sauce.

    nutrition info per serving: 253 calories; 19.3 g fat; 6.8 g saturated fat; 45.6 mg cholesterol; 9.2 g protein; 13.4 g carbohydrates; 1 g fi ber; 54.7 mg sodium (based on 4 servings)

  • Stovetop-Smoked Wild Salmon

    1 tablespoon each dried dill and parsley
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
    1 (1 pound) wild Alaskan salmon fillet, 3/4-inch thick
    1/2 lemon, thinly sliced

    1. Follow brand instructions for preparing a stovetop smoker and smoking chips.

    2. Mix herbs, salt, pepper, and garlic powder in a small dish. Rub spices onto the fillet. Place lemon slices on top of the fish.

    3. Place fillet on the rack and close lid. Place the smoker on the burner and cook 25 minutes at medium heat, until the fish flakes.

    Nutrition info per serving (2 to 4): 210 calories; 9.3 g fat; 1.4 g saturated fat; 80.5 mg cholesterol; 29.1 g protein; 1.1 g carbohydrates; 0.3 g fiber; 66.7 mg sodium (based on 4 servings)

  • Pan-Seared Halibut Steaks

    2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    2 tablespoons herbes de Provence spice blend (or 1 1/2 teaspoons each dried thyme, rosemary, savory and lavender)
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 wild Pacific halibut steaks, 1/2 pound each
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1/4 to 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
    1/4 teaspoon sugar
    Zest of 1/2 lemon (for garnish)

    1. Mix flour, dried herbs, salt, and pepper in a small dish. Rub over all sides of the fish.

    2. Heat oil over medium heat in large sauté pan. When pan is hot but not smoking, place the fish into the pan. Cook four minutes, flip and cook another three to four minutes on the other side, until the fish flakes open.

    3. Remove fish from pan and quickly add garlic, cooking 30 seconds. Add lemon juice and sugar, whisking to bring up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer one to two minutes to reduce the sauce. Drizzle over fish and garnish with lemon zest.

    Nutrition info per serving (2): 481 calories; 20.6 g fat; 2.9 g saturated fat; 92.9 mg cholesterol; 61.7 g protein; 10 g carbohydrates; 1.7 g fiber; 1,321 mg sodium

  • Tilapia Tortilla Stew

    4 tablespoons fresh lime juice,
    plus 1 tablespoon for sauce
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    3 tablespoons chopped cilantro,
    plus extra for garnish
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1 1/2 pounds US tilapia
    1 (16 ounce) jar tomato salsa
    1 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
    4 small handfuls broken tortilla chips
    1 tablespoon olive oil, for drizzling
    1 avocado, diced

    1. Mix 4 tablespoons of lime juice with garlic, cilantro, and salt in a large casserole dish. Lay the tilapia fi llets side by side atop the marinade. Let sit 15 minutes, turning once or twice to coat all sides.

    2. Bring salsa and chicken broth to a simmer in a large skillet. Add the tilapia with juices. Simmer 10 minutes, until fi sh is fi rm and opaque. Break the fi sh into large pieces with a wooden spatula.

    3. To serve, line four bowls with a handful of broken tortilla chips. Spoon stew over chips and drizzle with a touch of the remaining lime juice and olive oil. Garnish with avocado and cilantro

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 310 calories; 14.5 g fat; 1.7 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 34 g protein; 16.4 g carbohydrates; 4.5 g fi ber; 627 mg sodium

  • Get Your Goat

    The glossy mustache advertisements and dancing-cow commercials might try to convince you that bovines have cornered the milk market, but there’s a whole other category in the dairy case that’s got as much—or more—nutritional game: goat’s milk.

    Why it’s time to think beyond cow’s milk.
    By Jeanette Hurt
  • Ulcer Cure

    Stress, fatty foods, and smoking certainly aren’t good for your health, but scientists are now finding they may not always be to blame when it comes to ulcers. Instead, research shows the culprit is bacterial infection.

    Is it true that honey can cure ulcers?
    By Nora Simmons
  • Baby Greens Salad With Almonds, Goat Cheese, Dried Plums, and Raspberry-Chipotle Dressing

    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup raspberry jam
    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
    1 to 2 small canned chipotle
    peppers, seeded
    6 cups mixed baby greens
    1 cup dried plums (prunes),
    chopped
    1/2 cup toasted almonds, chopped
    4 ounces goat feta cheese

    1. In a blender, combine olive oil, jam, vinegar, and chipotle peppers; purée until smooth, and set aside.

    2. In a medium bowl, combine greens, plums, and walnuts. Add just enough dressing (about half), and toss to mix.

    3. Divide among four salad plates, and top with goat cheese. Serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 349 calories; 19 g fat; 6 g saturated fat; 25 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 7 g fiber; 357 mg sodium

  • Roasted Oysters and Black Olives With Rosemary

    1/4 cup olive oil
    4 medium garlic cloves, finely minced
    2 tablespoons finely minced fresh rosemary leaves
    2 cups shucked oysters, drained and patted dry
    2 cups kalamta olives (drained and rinsed)
    2 sprigs fresh rosemary

    Preheat to 400 degrees.

    1. In a small bowl, combine olive oil, minced garlic, and rosemary; stir to mix well.

    2. Add oysters, and stir to coat well. Add olives and mix.

    3. Arrange oysters and olives in a shallow baking pan, and roast for five to six minutes until oysters are cooked through.

    4. Remove from oven, and season with salt and pepper.

    5. Arrange on a serving platter with fresh rosemary sprigs, and serve immediately over angel-hair pasta tossed with olive oil, garlic, and minced fresh basil.

     

    nutrition info per serving (4): 300 calories; 26 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 66 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 8 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 588 mg sodium

  • Papaya-Mint Fool

    2 cups fresh or frozen and thawed papaya cubes (mango may be subsituted)
    1/4 cup honey
    2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (about half a lime)
    2 teaspoons dried mint
    1/2 cup full-fat yogurt, plain or vanilla
    Fresh mint leaves for garnish (optional)

     

    1. In a food processor, combine papaya or mango, honey, lime juice, and mint, and pulse to make a very coarse puree.

    2. Transfer to a medium bowl, and fold in yogurt; add more honey to taste.

    3. Divide among four individual serving dishes, and refrigerate for one to two hours before serving, or freeze for 30 minutes. Garnish with fresh mint; serve with biscotti.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 111 calories; 1 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 4 mg cholesterol; 2 g protein; 25 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 22 mg sodium