Healing Foods

  • Chicken Spinach Salad

    For the Dressing:
    1 orange
    1 lime
    1 tablespoon cilantro, minced
    1 teaspoon honey
    1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
    1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    Pinch cayenne
    Salt, pepper to taste

    For the Salad:
    6 cups spinach leaves
    1/2 cup thinly sliced red onions
    3 Roma tomatoes, sliced lengthwise
    1 red bell pepper, julienned
    1/2 cup baby carrots, cut matchstick thin
    1/3 cup dried cherries
    1/3 cup shelled pistachios
    2 tablespoons whole-wheat fl our
    1 teaspoon orange zest
    1/2 teaspoon lime zest
    Pinch cayenne
    2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2 large chicken breasts (about 1 pound)
    Juice of 1/2 lime

    Dressing:
    1. Zest orange and lime, setting aside 1 teaspoon orange zest and 1/2 teaspoon lime zest. Juice orange and 1/2 of lime, reserving second half for chicken.

    2. Using a food processor, add juices, zests, cilantro, honey, and mustard. Pulse until well mixed. Add olive oil, a little bit at a time, and pulse until emulsified. Add cayenne, salt, and pepper to taste.

     

    Salad:
    1. Mix first seven ingredients in a bowl.

    2. In a separate, small bowl, mix flour, fruit zests, and cayenne.

    3. Pound the chicken breasts to 1/2- to 3/4-inch thickness and dredge in flour mixture.

    4. Heat a large frying pan over medium-high heat. After one minute, add oil and chicken breasts. Turn every two minutes, cooking for 10 minutes. Squeeze the juice of half a lime over the chicken. Remove from heat, slice, add to salad, toss with dressing, and serve.
     

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 451 calories; 22.4 g fat; 3.2 g saturated fat; 68.4 mg cholesterol; 33.1 g protein; 31.5 g carbohydrates; 5.5 g fiber; 157.6 mg sodium

  • Egg-White Breakfast Casserole

    1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
    1/2 cup onions, diced
    12 egg whites
    1/4 cup fat-free milk
    2 slices whole-wheat bread, torn into pieces
    1 cup broccoli fl orets, steamed
    1 cup spinach, stems removed, steamed
    Pinch nutmeg
    Fresh ground pepper and sea salt, to taste
    2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
    1 1/2 cups fat-free milk
    3 to 4 whole cloves; 3 to 4 peppercorns
    1 slice of onion
    1 clove garlic
    1/4 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
    2 teaspoons oil drained from sun-dried
    tomatoes
    2 1/2 teaspoons whole-wheat fl our
    Cayenne, sea salt, pepper to taste

    1. Heat a large saucepan over medium heat. Add olive oil and onions. Cook until caramelized.

    2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9- by 9-inch baking dish. Whisk egg whites and milk. Season with cayenne, sea salt, and pepper. Spread bread pieces along bottom of pan; top with caramelized onions, broccoli fl orets, and spinach. Pour on the egg-white mixture. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper, and the Parmesan cheese. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes.

    3. While casserole bakes, put milk, cloves, peppercorns, and a slice of onion in a small pot. Cook over medium-high heat about five minutes. Remove from heat. Let stand for 15 minutes.

    4. Mince garlic and drained sun-dried tomatoes.

    5. Drain milk through a strainer into a bowl to remove cloves, peppercorns, and onion. In same pot, over medium heat, add oil and fl our. Stir to make a roux. Slowly add milk, whisking in a little at a time. When thickened, whisk in sun-dried tomatoes and garlic. Season with salt, pepper, and cayenne to taste.

    6. Serve casserole slices with a tablespoon of sundried tomato cream sauce on top.


    Nutrition info per serving (based on 6): 152 calories; 3.2 g fat; 0.7 g saturated fat; 2.7 mg cholesterol; 14.5 g protein; 17.3 g carbohydrates; 2.9 g fi ber; 304 mg sodium

  • Get Your Goat

    The glossy mustache advertisements and dancing-cow commercials might try to convince you that bovines have cornered the milk market, but there’s a whole other category in the dairy case that’s got as much—or more—nutritional game: goat’s milk.

    Why it's time to think beyond cow's milk.
    By Jeanette Hurt
  • Get Your Goat

    The glossy mustache advertisements and dancing-cow commercials might try to convince you that bovines have cornered the milk market, but there’s a whole other category in the dairy case that’s got as much—or more—nutritional game: goat’s milk.

    Why it’s time to think beyond cow’s milk.
    By Jeanette Hurt
  • Shrimp Skewers in Thai Peanut Marinade

    THAI PEANUT MARINADE
    1/4 cup peanut or almond butter
    1/2 cup coconut milk
    1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
    1 small shallot
    2 cloves garlic
    1/2-inch piece ginger, peeled
    2 teaspoons sugar or agave nectar
    1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
    1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
    1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
    Pinch red chili fl akes (optional)
    SKEWERS
    24 prawns, both shelled and
    deveined
    1 (14 ounce) can pineapple chunks
    6 (12-inch) skewers, or 24 toothpicks

    1. Blend sauce ingredients in a food processor until smooth. If making a double batch for dipping, reserve half the sauce. Marinate the prawns in the remaining sauce for 30 minutes, up to eight hours. Stir occasionally.

    2. Heat the grill to medium-high. Slip three shrimp and four pineapple chunks onto each skewer (for appetizers, place one each onto 24 toothpicks). Grill three minutes each side, until shrimp turn pink and pineapple chunks are slightly browned. Remove from heat and serve with the optional remaining sauce.

    nutrition info per serving: 253 calories; 19.3 g fat; 6.8 g saturated fat; 45.6 mg cholesterol; 9.2 g protein; 13.4 g carbohydrates; 1 g fi ber; 54.7 mg sodium (based on 4 servings)

  • Stovetop-Smoked Wild Salmon

    1 tablespoon each dried dill and parsley
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
    1 (1 pound) wild Alaskan salmon fillet, 3/4-inch thick
    1/2 lemon, thinly sliced

    1. Follow brand instructions for preparing a stovetop smoker and smoking chips.

    2. Mix herbs, salt, pepper, and garlic powder in a small dish. Rub spices onto the fillet. Place lemon slices on top of the fish.

    3. Place fillet on the rack and close lid. Place the smoker on the burner and cook 25 minutes at medium heat, until the fish flakes.

    Nutrition info per serving (2 to 4): 210 calories; 9.3 g fat; 1.4 g saturated fat; 80.5 mg cholesterol; 29.1 g protein; 1.1 g carbohydrates; 0.3 g fiber; 66.7 mg sodium (based on 4 servings)

  • Pan-Seared Halibut Steaks

    2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    2 tablespoons herbes de Provence spice blend (or 1 1/2 teaspoons each dried thyme, rosemary, savory and lavender)
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 wild Pacific halibut steaks, 1/2 pound each
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1/4 to 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
    1/4 teaspoon sugar
    Zest of 1/2 lemon (for garnish)

    1. Mix flour, dried herbs, salt, and pepper in a small dish. Rub over all sides of the fish.

    2. Heat oil over medium heat in large sauté pan. When pan is hot but not smoking, place the fish into the pan. Cook four minutes, flip and cook another three to four minutes on the other side, until the fish flakes open.

    3. Remove fish from pan and quickly add garlic, cooking 30 seconds. Add lemon juice and sugar, whisking to bring up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer one to two minutes to reduce the sauce. Drizzle over fish and garnish with lemon zest.

    Nutrition info per serving (2): 481 calories; 20.6 g fat; 2.9 g saturated fat; 92.9 mg cholesterol; 61.7 g protein; 10 g carbohydrates; 1.7 g fiber; 1,321 mg sodium

  • Turning the Tides

    Buying seafood these days is no easy feat. With wild fish stocks disappearing fast and concerns about the safety of farmed fish rising (not to mention the negative impact it’s having on the ocean environment) health-conscious consumers want to know which is better: wild or farmed?

    The smartest seafood choices for your health—and the Earth.
    By Alison Anton
  • Tilapia Tortilla Stew

    4 tablespoons fresh lime juice,
    plus 1 tablespoon for sauce
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    3 tablespoons chopped cilantro,
    plus extra for garnish
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1 1/2 pounds US tilapia
    1 (16 ounce) jar tomato salsa
    1 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
    4 small handfuls broken tortilla chips
    1 tablespoon olive oil, for drizzling
    1 avocado, diced

    1. Mix 4 tablespoons of lime juice with garlic, cilantro, and salt in a large casserole dish. Lay the tilapia fi llets side by side atop the marinade. Let sit 15 minutes, turning once or twice to coat all sides.

    2. Bring salsa and chicken broth to a simmer in a large skillet. Add the tilapia with juices. Simmer 10 minutes, until fi sh is fi rm and opaque. Break the fi sh into large pieces with a wooden spatula.

    3. To serve, line four bowls with a handful of broken tortilla chips. Spoon stew over chips and drizzle with a touch of the remaining lime juice and olive oil. Garnish with avocado and cilantro

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 310 calories; 14.5 g fat; 1.7 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 34 g protein; 16.4 g carbohydrates; 4.5 g fi ber; 627 mg sodium

  • Papaya-Mint Fool

    2 cups fresh or frozen and thawed papaya cubes (mango may be subsituted)
    1/4 cup honey
    2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (about half a lime)
    2 teaspoons dried mint
    1/2 cup full-fat yogurt, plain or vanilla
    Fresh mint leaves for garnish (optional)

     

    1. In a food processor, combine papaya or mango, honey, lime juice, and mint, and pulse to make a very coarse puree.

    2. Transfer to a medium bowl, and fold in yogurt; add more honey to taste.

    3. Divide among four individual serving dishes, and refrigerate for one to two hours before serving, or freeze for 30 minutes. Garnish with fresh mint; serve with biscotti.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 111 calories; 1 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 4 mg cholesterol; 2 g protein; 25 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 22 mg sodium