Healing Foods

  • It's Easy Eating Green

    Craving salads this time of year—but tired of the same old bowl of greens? Move over, iceberg: These leafy greens will transform your next salad and help you get your recommended daily veggie intake. San Francisco-based chef and nutrition consultant Grace Avila shares her favorite preparations and pairings for the following eight super-greens.

    Spruce up your next meal with these 8 unusual salad greens.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Basic Kefir

    1 tablespoon new kefir grains (rinsed with milk)
    1 cup whole milk or plain soy milk

    1. If you’re starting with new kefir grains, rinse them with milk in a plastic strainer. Place kefir in a small glass jar, and add milk. Cover with a cloth or piece of paper, and let ferment at room temperature for 24 hours.

    2. Stir mixture with a wooden or plastic spoon. Using a plastic strainer, strain kefir into a container. Store in refrigerator.

    3. Kefir grains will continue to grow and multiply. To slow down production, ferment them in the fridge for five days, instead of 24 hours at room temperature.

    Nutrition info per serving, per one cup (using whole milk): 162 calories; 8 g fat; 5 g saturated fat; 30 mg cholesterol; 8 g protein; 15 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 125 mg sodium

  • Berry-Banana Kefir Smoothie

    1 cup kefir
    1/2 cup frozen berries (blueberries, strawberries, or raspberries)
    1 ripe banana
    1 tablespoon honey (optional)
    5 to 6 ice cubes

    1. Place all ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth.

    Quick tip: Too rushed in the morning to take out the blender and whip up a smoothie? Simply mix one part kefir with one part fruit juice in a glass. The banana and berries are prebiotic foods, which help stimulate the probiotics in the kefir to reproduce in your digestive system and create a healthy environment there.

    Nutrition info per serving (2): 185 calories; 4 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 15 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 35 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 65 mg sodium

  • Fermented Food Fest

    When most of us decide to add “good” bacteria to our diet, we typically turn to probiotic supplements and yogurt. Good choices to be sure, but not the only ones available. Look beyond the dairy aisle to fermented foods, which teem with healthy, good-for-you bacteria.

    Simply delicious and easy to make—and so good for your health.
    By Gretchen Roberts
  • Mixed Berry Sorbet

    6 cups fresh or frozen and thawed berries
    1/8 cup lemon juice
    1/2 cup soy milk
    1/3 to 1/2 cup honey
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    Low-fat Greek vanilla yogurt (optional)

    1. In a food processor, combine berries, lemon juice, soymilk, honey and salt; puree until smooth. Cover and refrigerate until chilled.
    2. Transfer to an ice cream maker and process according to directions. Serve immediately as is, or blend 1/4 cup yogurt into each 1-cup serving of sorbet for a creamier flavor and texture.

    Nutrition info per serving: 211 calories; 1.5 g fat; 0.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 2.8 g protein; 51.8 g carbohydrates; 9.1 g fiber; 166.4 mg sodium

  • The Anti-Aging Diet

    Anti-aging. We see the term everywhere, from magazine covers and supplements labels to beauty creams and exercise regimes—all promising to make us look and feel younger. While you can’t avoid getting older, one thing is clear: The foods you eat play a crucial role in keeping your body healthy and your brain functioning well into your senior years.

    10 foods to help you look and feel younger
    By Lisa Turner
  • Garlic Curry Cauliflower

    1 large head fresh cauliflower, cut into florets
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1/2 cup yellow onion, diced
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh gingerroot, minced
    1 cup light coconut milk
    1 tablespoon curry powder
    1/4 teaspoon white pepper
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup fresh cilantro, minced

    1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
    2. In an 8-inch-square glass casserole, coat cauliflower with olive oil. Roast 10 minutes.
    3. Combine onion, garlic, ginger, coconut milk, curry powder, white pepper, and salt.
    4. Pour coconut milk mixture over the cauliflower, cover loosely with foil, and roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until cauliflower is tender. Remove from oven and stir in cilantro.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 186 calories; 13.5 g fat; 6.4 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 5.4 g protein; 15.6 g carbohydrates; 6.2 g fiber; 359.5 mg sodium

  • The Well-Stocked Kitchen

    Each year, Americans spend an estimated $46 billion on diet products and self-help books. We fill our grocery carts with the foods these plans claim will help us lose weight and keep it off. And what does that mean for so many of us? We’ve got a pantry full of our best intentions and no clue what to do with them.

    Must-have foods for your panty, fridge, and freezer. And how to use them.
  • Get Your Game On

    If the warmer weather has you itchin’ to start grillin’—but you’re worried about the fat and cholesterol in burgers and steaks—there’s good news. Bison, elk, venison, ostrich, and grass-fed (as well as grass-finished) beef offer the flavor you crave with a lot less of the bad stuff—in fact, they have half the fat of chicken.

    Tasty reasons to think beyond beef
    By Ellen Jacobsen
  • Green Tea and Ginger Salmon

    3/4 cup water
    1 3-inch gingerroot, grated
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    2 green tea bags
    2 teaspoons plus 2 tablespoons honey
    1 1/2 pounds wild Alaskan salmon, skin removed
    1 tablespoon white miso
    2 tablespoons Dijon or spicy brown mustard

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. Combine water and grated ginger into a small saucepan. Bring to a boil; remove from heat and add garlic, green tea, and 2 teaspoons honey. Cover and let brew for five minutes. Remove tea bags; set mixture aside.
    3. Place salmon in a baking pan and pour green tea mixture over fish. Cover loosely with foil and bake 12 to 15 minutes.
    4. Remove from oven and turn broiler to high. In a small bowl, combine miso, mustard, and 2 tablespoons honey. Spread mixture over fish and broil two minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 379.8 calories; 12.8 g fat; 2.7 g saturated fat; 96.9 mg cholesterol; 46.8 g protein; 15.2 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 408.7 mg sodium