Healing Foods

  • Pineapple-Date Ambrosia

    1 cup Greek or regular plain, unsweetened yogurt
    4 to 6 tablespoons agave nectar (depending upon desired sweetness)
    4 cups diced fresh, ripe pineapple
    1 heaping cup chopped dates
    1 cup coconut flakes
    1/2 cup minced fresh mint leaves

    1. Mix the yogurt and agave together in a dish.

    2. Toss all remaining ingredients in a large bowl and gently blend in the yogurt. Let sit 10 minutes before serving to allow flavors to develop.

    Nutrition info per serving (based on 6 servings): 228.1 calories; 6.4 g fat; 4.9 g saturated fat; 5.3 mg cholesterol; 3.1 g protein; 44.3 g carbohydrates; 5.1 g fiber; 24.2 mg sodium

  • Move Over OJ!

    It’s a jungle out there in the juice aisle. With new arrivals hailing from exotic locales like the Amazon, Fiji, and Tibet—and with names that sound more like cartoon characters than food—you can feel like you’re stepping into another world when you first venture beyond your usual glass of orange juice.

    5 fruit juices that trump the old breakfast standby
    By Nora Simmons
  • Eat to Beat Inflammation

    Inflammation has become quite the buzzword lately, touted as the cause of everything from acne to Alzheimer’s and from digestive issues to obesity. And while new research continues to support that theory, it’s important to remember that inflammation can actually be a good thing.

    7 foods that can transform your health
    By Alison Anton
  • A Salad Fit For Your Skin

    Toss avocado, lettuce, and tomato with a splash of olive oil, and you have a healthy salad. Bottle them up with staples like aloe vera and sweet almond oil, and you have a recipe for serious beauty boosting.

    The nutrients that feed your body can also nourish your complexion.
    By Josie Garthwaite
  • Olive Tapenade

    1 cup pitted Kalamata olives
    1 canned sardine fillet
    2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
    1/2 tablespoon capers
    2 cloves garlic
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 teaspoon sugar (optional)

    Blend all ingredients in a food processor or blender until pureed.

    Nutrition info per serving (4 to 6): 160.4 calories; 15 g fat; 0.7 g saturated fat; 2.8 mg cholesterol; 0.6 g protein; 6.1 g carbohydrates; 0.1 g fiber; 712.9 mg sodium

  • Green and Gold Salad

    DRESSING
    3 tablespoons unfiltered honey, softened if hard
    2 teaspoons lemon zest (grated peel)
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
    1 tablespoon walnut oil
    Dash cinnamon, dash ground ginger
    Pinch ground nutmeg, pinch salt

    SALAD
    6 cups baby spinach
    1/4 red onion, thinly sliced into rounds
    1 orange or medium grapefruit
    1/4 cup chopped raw walnuts
    Pinch cinnamon (for garnish)

    1. Whisk the dressing ingredients in a small dish until emulsified.

    2. Arrange the spinach on a large platter and top with the red onion rounds.

    3. Remove the stem and opposite end of the orange with a sharp knife. Lay the orange flat side down, and slice the skin off in 1- or 2-inch sections from top to bottom, taking care not to remove too much of the fruit. Turn the orange so the flat ends face to the sides. Slice the orange into 1/4-inch rounds, and quarter each round.

    4. Arrange the oranges in a decorative fashion over the spinach and onions. Drizzle the salad generously with the dressing, and sprinkle with the chopped walnuts and cinnamon.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 162 calories; 9 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 3 g protein; 22 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 38 mg sodium

  • Basic Homemade Yogurt

    4 cups (1 quart) milk (skim, 1 percent,  2 percent, or whole)
    1/2 cup powdered milk (optional, for thicker yogurt)
    1/2 cup plain, live culture yogurt

    1. Heat milk and powdered milk (optional) over medium heat in a small saucepan to 180 degrees (use a candy thermometer), stirring frequently. Remove from heat, and let cool to 110 degrees (about an hour).

    2. Gently stir yogurt culture into milk, and pour mixture into a clean glass jar. Cover.

    3. Choose your incubation method:
    • Use a commercial yogurt maker (such as the Salton 1-quart yogurt maker).
    • Place jars in a hot water bath in the oven on its lowest setting (temperature should not exceed 110 degrees).
    • Pour hot water into a cooler, and incubate the jars in there, changing the water every few hours if necessary.

    4. Incubate yogurt at 110 degrees for four to 10 hours or until set. The longer you incubate, the more tart the yogurt will taste. The mixture needs to stay close to 110 degrees for the bacteria to do their job. Lower temperatures deactivate the cultures, and higher temperatures will kill them.

    5. Stir in sweetener, honey, or fruit as desired. Refrigerate up to two weeks.
    Quick tip: Homemade yogurt tends to be thinner than store-bought, but adding powdered milk to the mix will thicken it. Make sure the plain yogurt you buy to inoculate your homemade yogurt says “live and active cultures” on the label.

    Nutrition info per serving (using 1 percent milk and whole-milk yogurt): 121.2 calories; 3.4 g fat; 2.2 g saturated fat; 16.2 mg cholesterol; 9.3 g protein; 13.6 g carbohydrates; 0 g fiber; 121 mg sodium

  • Grilled Slmon with Yogurt Garlic Dill Sauce

    For The Salmon
    1 pound salmon, about 1 inch thick, cut into four filets
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon pepper

    For The Yogurt Garlic Dill Sauce
    1 cup plain yogurt (see recipe above)
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
    1 clove garlic, minced
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

    1. Spray grill with cooking spray, and heat to medium-high. Sprinkle salmon filets with salt and pepper, and grill four minutes a side (skin side up first) or until done.

    2. Separate fish from skin by sliding a spatula between them; transfer filets to a plate. Serve with yogurt garlic dill sauce.

    3. To make yogurt garlic dill sauce, combine all ingredients. Refrigerate until ready to use.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 249.3 calories; 9.5 g fat; 2.4 g saturated fat; 68.3 mg cholesterol; 34.3 g protein; 4.8 g carbohydrates; 0.1 g fiber; 394.1 mg sodium

  • Chicken Souvlaki Pitas

    1 pound chicken tenderloins
    Bamboo skewers
    4 whole-grain pitas

    For The  Souvlaki Marinade
    1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    1 teaspoon fresh (or 1/2 teaspoon dried) oregano
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    For The Tzatziki Sauce
    1 cup plain yogurt (see recipe above)
    1/2 medium cucumber, peeled, seeded, shredded
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    1 tablespoon minced fresh mint leaves
    1/2 teaspoon salt

    1. In a bowl, combine marinade ingredients. Add chicken, and mix well to coat. Marinate in refrigerator 30 minutes.

    2. Soak skewers in water for 30 minutes, and heat grill to medium. Thread chicken onto skewers, and grill four minutes on each side.

    3. Combine ingredients for tzatziki in a small bowl. Serve with the chicken in pitas

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 233.8 calories; 9.4 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 69.4 mg cholesterol; 29.8 g protein; 7 g carbohydrates; 0.5 g fiber; 408.6 mg sodium

  • 3 Foods That Fight Belly Fat

    Can’t seem to shed that spare tire around your middle, despite your best diet attempts? New research suggests that your belly fat itself could be to blame. In a study on rats, scientists found that fat cells within the abdomen produce a hormone called neuropeptide Y (NPY), an appetite stimulant previously thought to originate only in the brain.

    By Meghan Rabbitt