Healing Foods

  • Veg Out

    Ask a roomful of vegetarians why they decided to make the meat-free leap, and you’ll likely get a roomful of answers. Some might love animals. Some might have ecological reasons. Some might have eschewed their steak-eating days to lose weight.

    Becoming a vegetarian can do wonders for your health—if you do it right
    By Bryce Edmonds
  • Quinoa Vegetable Soup

    3/4 cup quinoa
    1 tablespoon canola oil
    2 onions, finely diced
    3 carrots, peeled and finely diced
    3 stalks celery, finely diced
    2 zucchini, finely diced
    1/2 cup yellow corn kernels
    1 red bell pepper, finely diced
    1 tablespoon minced garlic
    2 teaspoons sea salt
    12 cups low-sodium vegetable stock
    1 28-ounce can whole, peeled tomatoes
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    1/3 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
    Freshly ground black pepper

    1. Rinse quinoa well, and drain. Heat large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Add quinoa, and stir constantly for 10 minutes, or until the moisture evaporates and the quinoa crackles and becomes golden. Transfer quinoa to a bowl, and set aside.
    2. Heat oil in large, heavy stockpot over medium-high heat. Add onions, carrots, and celery. Sauté for 12 minutes. Add zucchini, corn, red pepper, garlic, and salt. Sauté 3 minutes longer, or until vegetables begin to release their juices.
    3. Add stock, cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in the toasted quinoa, and simmer over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes or until quinoa is almost tender.
    4. Squeeze the tomatoes into the soup, and add the juices from the can; then stir in the cumin and coriander. Simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until quinoa is tender.
    5. Stir in the cilantro, and season to taste with pepper and more salt, if desired.

    nutrition info per serving (10-12): 156 calories; 4 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 23 g carbohydrates; 152 mg sodium

  • Grain and Vegetable "Meat" Loaf

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    1 cup millet
    2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce
    1 1/2 cups soy granules
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon minced garlic
    1 teaspoon minced shallots
    1 cup chopped onions
    1 cup chopped zucchini
    1/2 cup chopped red bell peppers
    1/2 cup white wine
    1 teaspoon ground coriander
    1/4 cup julienned fresh basil
    1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
    2 teaspoons of tamari soy sauce
    1 cup cooked brown rice
    1 1/2 cups cooked lentils, pureed
    2 tablespoons egg whites (from 1 egg)
    Sea salt to taste
    Freshly ground black pepper to taste

    1. Simmer the millet in 2-1/2 cups of water for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat, cover, and let stand for 20 minutes. Fluff the millet with a fork before using.
    2. Meanwhile, in another saucepan, bring 1 cup of water to a boil with the soy sauce. Add the soy granules. Remove the pot from the heat, and let it sit covered for 10 minutes. Fluff the granules with a fork before using.
    3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat the olive oil. Add the garlic and shallots, and cook, stirring, until golden, about 1 minute. Add the onions, zucchini, and red peppers, and cook, stirring, for 4 to 6 minutes. Add the wine, coriander, basil, and parsley. Simmer until the liquid is reduced 75 percent, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a mixing bowl.
    4. Mix soy sauce into cooked rice.
    5. Add the rice, lentils, soy granules, millet, and egg white to the sautéed vegetables, and season with salt and black pepper to taste. Mix thoroughly.
    6. Spray a nonstick loaf pan with canola oil spray, and firmly press the mixture into the pan. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes. Let cool for 20 to 30 minutes before slicing.

    nutrition info (8): 236.1 calories; 3.2 g fat;1.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 23.6 g protein; 33.9 g carbohydrates; 276 mg sodium

  • Spiced Nut and Seed Mix

    1 tablespoon melted butter
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 tablespoon agave nectar
    1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
    1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
    1/8 teaspoon cayenne
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup walnuts
    1 cup almonds
    1/2 cup pumpkinseeds
    1/4 cup sunflower seeds
    2 tablespoons flaxseeds

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. In a medium saucepan, combine butter, olive oil, agave, and spices. Cook on low heat for one minute. Add nuts and seeds; coat well.
    3. Spread in a single layer on baking sheet. Roast 5 minutes, or until nuts are golden.

    nutrition info: 203.4 calories; 17.7 g fat; 2.3 g saturated fat; 3.1 mg cholesterol; 5.9 g protein;
    8.5 g carbohydrates; 3.4 g fiber; 118.9 mg sodium

  • Eat to Beat the Blues

    Ever wonder why you can’t resist the urge to overdo it on unhealthy foods when you’re feeling down? Turns out there’s a physiological reason we eat too much bread, ice cream, and other “comfort” foods when we’re depressed: The sugar and carbs they typically contain give us a mental and physical lift.

    36 foods to stave off— and cure—depression.
    By Lisa Turner
  • Warm Artichoke and Crab Dip

    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 red bell pepper, finely chopped
    3 medium garlic cloves, crushed
    1 15-ounce can artichoke hearts, chopped
    1 small Serrano chile, seeded and finely minced
    6 scallions, thinly sliced (include some green tops)
    1/2 cup Montrachet, or other creamy goat cheese
    1/2 pound jumbo lump crabmeat, picked over
    1/4 cup grated Asiago cheese
    1/4 cup finely chopped raw walnuts

    1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

    2. In a medium saucepan, heat olive oil and sauté red pepper and garlic until red pepper is tender. Remove from heat and stir in artichokes, Serrano chile, scallions, and goat cheese. Gently fold in crabmeat.

    3. Transfer to a lightly oiled baking dish. Sprinkle with grated Asiago and walnuts. Bake on middle rack about 20 minutes.

    4. Remove from oven and serve warm, with sliced whole-grain baguette or crackers.

    nutrition info per serving (6 to 8): 210.4 calories; 15.3 g fat; 4.8 g saturated fat; 21.1 mg cholesterol; 9.4 g protein; 10.6 g carbohydrates; 3.6 g fiber; 296.8 mg sodium

  • Chickpea and Red Pepper Salad With Lemon-Garlic Dressing

    1/2 cup silken tofu
    1/4 cup olive oil
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1 small garlic clove, pressed
    1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons
    fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped
    4 cups mesclun mix
    4 cups arugula
    1 15-ounce can chickpeas
    1 small red pepper, cored and
    cut into thin strips
    1/2 small red onion, very thinly sliced
    1/2 cup black olives
    1/2 cup almonds
    Additional whole basil leaves for garnish

    1. To make dressing, combine tofu, olive oil and lemon juice in a blender, and puree until smooth and creamy. Add garlic and puree again for 5 seconds. Add 2 tablespoons of the basil leaves and pulse briefly to combine, leaving some visible pieces of basil. Set aside.
    2. In a medium salad bowl, combine mesclun mix, arugula, remaining basil, chickpeas, red pepper, and onion. Add just enough dressing to very lightly coat, and toss to mix. Divide salad among four individual plates and top each with olives and almonds. Garnish with additional basil leaves, if desired, and serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 387 calories; 26.1 g fat; 2.9 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 11.7 g protein; 30.2 g carbohydrates; 7.8 g fiber; 433.8 mg sodium

  • Poached Salmon Over Spinach With Mango Salsa

    1 cup fresh or frozen and thawed mango cubes
    1 Serrano chile, seeded and minced
    1/2 cup red onion, diced
    1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
    Juice of 1/2 lime
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    4 6-ounce salmon fillets
    4 teaspoons low-sodium
    Soy sauce
    4 large garlic cloves, minced
    1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    1 10-ounce bag baby
    Spinach leaves

    1. To make salsa, in a medium bowl combine mango, chile, onion, cilantro, and lime; stir to mix. Season with salt and pepper, and set aside.

    2. In a large skillet, heat olive oil. Place salmon fillets, flesh side down, in a skillet and cook for 1 minute, or until lightly browned. Turn fillets over and place in skillet, skin side down. Sprinkle fish with soy sauce, garlic, and red pepper flakes. Add 1/2 inch of water to skillet, cover, and cook on medium until fish is opaque, 6 to 10 minutes.

    3. Remove fish from the skillet and increase heat to medium-high. Add spinach to the skillet and cook for 1 minute, or until just wilted. Remove spinach and divide among four individual plates. Top each plate with a salmon fillet; garnish with salsa.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 366 calories; 18 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 92 mg cholesterol; 37 g protein; 15 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 311 mg sodium

     

  • Cranberry-Almond Bread Pudding

    4 cups cubed, day-old whole-wheat bread
    1 cup cranberries, chopped
    1/2 cup sliced toasted almonds
    2 eggs
    2 egg whites
    2 cups evaporated skim milk
    3 tablespoons butter, melted
    1/2 cup agave nectar
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 teaspoon almond extract

    1. In a 13- by 9- by 2-inch baking dish coated with cooking spray, mix bread cubes, cranberries, and almonds.
    2. In a bowl, beat together eggs, egg whites, milk, butter, agave nectar, vanilla, and almond extract. Pour over bread mixture.
    3. Cover, and refrigerate for at least an hour (or overnight). Bake at 350 degrees for 40 minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving (12): 220 calories; 6 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 10 mg cholesterol; 5 g protein; 52 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 414 mg sodium

  • Sweet Tidings

    Walk into Mani’s,a popular Los Angeles bakery, and the chocolate-filled cookies, rich brownies, and cakes might have you mentally kissing your healthy eating habits good-bye. But stick around long enough and you’ll discover that the delicious-looking sweets lining the cases in front of you don’t have a bit of refined sugar in them.

    You can avoid sugar and still indulge with these all-natural alternatives.
    By Wendy McMillan