Healing Foods

  • Dill Tofu Dip

    12-ounce block soft tofu, drained and patted dry
    1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
    3 tablespoons finely minced yellow onion
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
    2 tablespoons mellow white miso
    2 tablespoons water
    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    Freshly ground black pepper to taste

    1. Place all the ingredients into a blender, and blend well.
    2. Refrigerate for 2 hours, and serve with carrot and celery sticks, as well as colorful bell peppers and radishes.

    nutrition info per serving: 47 calories; 2.1 g fat; .3 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 3.9 g protein; 3.7 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 227.9 mg sodium

  • Riso Di Basilico

    2 cups loosely packed fresh basil leaves
    2 tablespoons pine nuts
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    2 tablespoons mellow white miso paste
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    6 cups cooked brown rice

    1. Put the basil, pine nuts, garlic, and miso paste into a food processor, and blend.
    2. Slowly add the oil in a fine stream until the paste is smooth and creamy. Scrape the sides of the processor to make sure that the mixture is completely blended. Set aside.
    3. Place the rice in a large bowl. Pour the basil mixture onto the rice, and mix well.
    4. Serve cold as a salad or hot as a side dish.

    nutrition info per serving: 239.5 calories; 16.2 g fat; 2.2 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 2.3 g protein; 21.3 g carbohydrates; 1.6 g fiber; 158.7 mg sodium

  • Butternut Squash Soup

    3 tablespoons olive oil
    2 cups chopped celery
    2 cups chopped leeks (white parts)
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    2 cups chopped parsley
    2 cups chopped carrots
    2 medium potatoes with skin, diced
    1 medium parsnip, diced
    4 cups butternut squash, peeled and diced
    6 small zucchini, sliced
    4 cups free-range chicken broth
    6 cups water
    Sea salt and pepper to taste

    1. Add olive oil to a soup pot over medium.
    2. Add the celery, leeks, and garlic, and sauté for about 5 to 7 minutes or until the leeks become translucent. Add the chopped parsley.
    3. Add carrots, potatoes, parsnip, and squash; cook for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring constantly.
    4. Add in the sliced zucchini and continue to cook for another 5 minutes.
    5. Add broth and water. Bring to a boil.
    6. Reduce heat, and simmer for 45 minutes.

    nutrition info per serving: 124 calories; 4 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 4 g protein; 21 g carbohydrates; 6.2 g fiber; 66 mg sodium

  • Ode to an Olive

    In the late spring, throughout the rocky terrain of the Mediterranean, the gnarled limbs of the Olea europaea tree begin to bud with olives. Too bitter to eat right off the tree, they’re first fermented and cured in oil, salt, or brine (a combination of salt and water or wine). The method and ingredients determine the olive’s final flavor, texture, and color.

    These little fruits are as nutritious as they are tasty.
    By Lisa Turner
  • The Healthy Heart Diet

    When Mary Anne Nally of Southold, New York, went for her annual physical, she feared what her doctor might say when he saw her blood-test results. “High cholesterol runs in my family, and even though I eat a relatively healthy diet, I had a sneaking suspicion mine was high too,” says the 54-year-old.

    By Lambeth Hochwald / Recipes by Maria Cooper
  • Say "C" to Stave Off Arthritis

    Eating vitamin C–rich foods may protect your knees from osteoarthritis, reports a recent study in Arthritis Research & Therapy. Here’s why: They’re packed with antioxidants, which protect cells from oxidative damage, and oxidative damage breaks down cartilage—the “shock absorber” in the knee joint.

    By Celia Shatzman
  • Oatmeal Raisin Pancakes

    1 1/2 cups quick oats
    1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
    2 tablespoons wheat germ
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 tablespoon cinnamon
    3 tablespoons brown sugar
    3/4 cup raisins
    3 egg whites
    1 1/2 cups skim milk (or nondairy alternative)
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    2 ripe bananas, mashed (microwave 20 seconds if not very ripe)
    1/4 cup nonfat plain yogurt
    Nonstick cooking spray

    1. Mix dry ingredients in large bowl and create a well in the center.
    2. Whisk together wet ingredients, and pour into the well and blend.
    3. Heat a large non-stick skillet to medium–high heat, and cover with non-stick spray. Pour 1/4 cup portions onto pan and cook approximately 2 to 4 minutes on each side. Serve with a sprinkle of powdered sugar.

    nutrition info (per pancake): 93.4 calories; 0.7 g fat; 0.2 g saturated fat; 0.5 mg cholesterol; 3.6 g protein; 19.4 g carbohydrates; 1.9 g fiber; 163.1 mg sodium

  • Grilled Cod With Black Bean–Mango Salsa

     

    4 1/2 pounds cod fillets
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin
    olive oil

    Black Bean-Mango Salsa
    Makes 6 cups

    1 lime
    1/2 orange, reserving zest
    1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
    1 teaspoon honey
    1 small, minced jalapeño pepper (optional)
    1 15 oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
    1 small mango, diced (1 cup)
    1/2 cup green onion, finely sliced
    1/2 cup chopped cilantro

    1. Mix together all black bean–mango salsa ingredients at least 30 minutes (and up to 24 hours) prior to serving.
    2. Lightly brush cod fillets on both sides with extra-virgin olive oil and grill 6 to 7 minutes on each side, until fish is opaque.
    3. Mound 1 1/2 cups of black bean mixture on a plate. Lean each piece of grilled cod against salsa.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 339.1 calories; 2.1 g fat; 0.4 g saturated fat; 93.5 mg cholesterol; 46.1 g protein; 33.6 g carbohydrates; 7.8 g fiber; 136.7 mg sodium

  • Better Berries to Fight Cancer

    The next time you toss a handful of berries into your morning smoothie, reach for freeze-dried instead of fresh or frozen. Science now indicates that freeze-dried berries, specifically black raspberries, inhibit cancer development by restoring hundreds of cancer-altered genes to their normal state.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • Good Nuts to Crack

    Wish you could ditch your snack attacks? Maybe you don’t need to after all. Research shows munching on smaller meals throughout the day can actually help you shed pounds—but only if you choose wisely.

    From almonds to pistachios, tasty munchies to boost your health.
    By Molly Lyons