Healing Foods

  • Think Outside the Bag

    Talk about a serendipitous event: Legend has it that chance brewed the first tea when Camellia sinensis leaves blew into a pot of boiling water. It was 2737 BC, and the accidental teameister who boiled that water, Chinese Emperor Shen Nung, concluded the new brew gave “vigor of body, contentment of mind, and determination of purpose.”

    Get all the benefits of tea without curing up with a cup.
    By Bryce Edmonds
  • What a Catch

    Lobster and tuna and barramundi—oh my! Standing in front of the fish counter isn’t as easy as it used to be. Tuna or tilapia, salmon or sardines, farmed or wild, fresh or frozen—the choices are enough to make my head swim … I mean spin. Plus, I’m nursing a newborn, and it just seems easier to skip seafood altogether instead of making the wrong choice.

    How to choose the most sustainable seafood
    By Allison Young / Recipes by Rebecca Caro
  • Grilled Halibut with Fava Bean Mash

    Halibut fillet
    Salt and pepper to taste
    1/2 cup fava beans
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
     

    1. Season halibut fillet with salt and pepper, grill 3 minutes on each side or until cooked through.
    2. In a medium bowl, combine fava beans,  olive oil, and lemon juice. Mash roughly with a fork until combined.
    3. Place fish on top of the fava bean mash.

  • The Clear Skin Diet

    Jodi Frestedt breezed through her teenage years without so much as a pimple. While most of her peers suffered their share of embarrassing breakouts, Frestedt never gave her skin a second thought as she posed for school pictures and primped for prom. But at age 26, her face erupted in a slew of blemishes, leaving her baffled and suddenly self-conscious.

    Five foods to eat, and four to avoid, for a glowing complexion.
    By Melaina Juntti
  • Pineapple-Tofu Fried Rice

    1 package firm tofu, drained and cubed
    1 tablespoon soy sauce
    2 tablespoons cooking sherry
    2 cloves minced garlic
    1 tablespoon minced ginger root
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    1/3 cup pineapple juice
    1 cup finely diced carrots
    1 cup frozen peas
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    3 cups brown rice, cooked
    1 cup bite-sized chunks fresh pineapple

    1. Place tofu in a large bowl. Combine soy sauce and cooking sherry and pour over tofu. Marinate for 1 hour.
    2. Sauté garlic and gingerroot in olive oil for 1 to 2 minutes over medium heat. Add pineapple juice, carrots, peas, and salt, and sauté until vegetables are tender.
    3. Add brown rice, tofu (and the tofu marinade), and pineapple chunks to skillet and cook until rice and tofu are heated through.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 399 calories; 13 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 17 g protein; 55 g carbohydrates; 5 g fiber; 315 mg sodium

  • Ratatouille With Scrambled Egg Whites

    2 cloves minced garlic
    1 onion, diced
    4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2 zucchini, sliced
    1 green bell pepper, diced
    1 Japanese/Chinese eggplant, sliced
    2 tomatoes, diced
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
    2 teaspoons dried basil
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon salt
    8 egg whites

    1. In a skillet, sauté garlic and onion in 2 tablespoons olive oil for 1 to 2 minutes over medium heat.
    2. Add zucchini and bell pepper, and continue to sauté over medium heat for another 3 to 4 minutes.
    3. Add eggplant and continue to sauté over medium heat until all vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, salt, and all the herbs. Mix well and set aside.
    4. In a skillet, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Add egg whites; cook until the whites are set but still moist.
    5. Place scrambled eggs on a large plate and top with ratatouille.

    nutrition info per serving (6): 194 calories; 12 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 1 mg cholesterol; 12 g protein; 11 g carbohydrates; 5 g fiber; 543 mg sodium

  • Salmon Dill Soup

    2 medium salmon fillets, skin removed
    2 cups water
    1 medium sweet potato, peeled and diced
    2 medium carrots, peeled and diced
    1/2 onion, diced
    3 cups vanilla rice milk
    1/2 cup finely chopped fresh dill, stems removed
    1 teaspoon salt
    6 tablespoons cornstarch

    1. Slice each salmon fillet very thinly into bite-sized pieces, and set aside.
    2. In a pot, bring water, sweet potato, carrots, and onion to a boil, then reduce to a medium-high heat, cover, and cook until vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes.
    3. Add rice milk and bring to a boil.
    4. Add salmon, dill, and salt, and reduce heat to medium until salmon is done, about 3 minutes.
    5. Mix cornstarch with just enough cold water to dissolve and add to soup. Bring soup to a boil while stirring, and allow mixture to thicken for 1 to 2 minutes.
    6. Remove from heat and serve warm.

    nutrition info per serving (4 to 6): 322.9 calories; 4.7 g fat; 1.5 g saturated fat; 30 mg cholesterol; 17 g protein; 52.5 g carbohydrates; 2.5 g fiber; 516.3 mg sodium

  • Got (Non-Dairy) Milk?

    As the mustached celebrities in those milk ads tell us, milk does a body good thanks to its calcium, vitamin D, and other nutrients. But what if you’re lactose intolerant, vegan, or simply not a fan of cow’s milk? You have plenty of nondairy options—from the more common ones like soy and rice milks to the nut, oat, and even hemp varieties.

    By Erin Quinn
  • Beet, Pear, and Cranberry Salad

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    3 beets, peeled and cubed
    2/3 cup peach jam
    1 tablespoon lime juice
    2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
    4 Bartlett pears, peeled and cubed
    1 cup dried cranberries

    1. Steam beets in a colander until tender, about 20 minutes. Set aside to cool.
    2. In a saucepan, heat jam, lime juice, and Dijon mustard over low heat and stir until blended.
    3. In a large bowl, mix together the beets, pears, cranberries, and warm peach sauce. Toss well to coat.

    nutrition info per serving (6): 264.2 calories; 0.5 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 1.3 g protein; 66 g carbohydrates; 5.8 g fiber; 45.3 mg sodium

  • Build A Better Salad

    Want to boost brain health or eat to beat cancer? Make yourself a salad. Beth Reardon, RD, LDN, at Duke Integrative Medicine, helps you customize your greens.

    By Nicole Duncan