Healing Foods

  • Tea for Your: Detox

    Detoxification, the process of removing harmful toxins from the body, is a great way to achieve a higher level of health. Detoxes can last from a few days to a few weeks and can include drinking juices, cutting out sugar and flour, or eating a diet high in fiber.

  • Cancer Fighters

    Garlic, leeks, yellow onions, dark green veggies, and cruciferous veggies have been shown to powerfully counteract cancer cell growth, according to a recent study in Food Chemistry. If you need a refresher, cruci­ferous vegetables come from the family Cruciferae (also called Brassicaceae).

  • Eating Well and Losing Weight

    Mark Hyman, MD, makes some pretty bold promises in his feature. I got a prerelease copy of his new book, The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet, and embarked on a 10-day journey with two of our readers, Nancie Carter and Jennifer Schreiner, to see if this program would do what he claimed.

    DETOX OVERVIEW

    A firsthand report on the 10-Day Detox Diet
    By Adam Swenson
  • The Über Tuber

    On the lower slopes of the Andes Mountains in Peru grows a tuber nicknamed “the apple of the earth.” A staple of the Peruvian diet for thousands of years, yacón has a tremendous list of benefits: It is low in calories, has a low glycemic index, and provides a rich supply of inulin, an important prebiotic fiber.

    A look at the many benefits of yacón
    By Adam Swenson
  • Are You Food Addicted?

    Detox is big these days. Everybody’s talking about it and trying it—juicing, fasting, cleansing, odd diets, colonics, and more. There are ancient healing systems that teach about detoxification—including ayurveda—and each approach has its pros and cons.

    By Mark Hyman, MD
  • Tea For Your: Upset Stomach

    Your stomach can become upset for many reasons. If you’ve eaten something spicy, had a little too much alcohol, eaten too fast, or you’ve been stressed about something in your life, you could easily develop indigestion. Most importantly, remember to slow down when you’re eating, practice calming exercises, and go easy on the alcohol.

  • Tea for Your: Anxiety

    Whether your child has the back-to-school jitters or you’re nervous about sending your first-born off to college, both of you can benefit from a cup of chamomile tea. The herb works to relax blood vessels and smooth muscle fibers, effectively soothing and calming the body. Additionally, chamomile promotes healthy sleep—which translates into a healthier day.

  • A Perfect Potato Salad for the First Days of Spring

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    As the weather warms, fresh and colorful ingredients become more and more abundant on our plates. This spring, allow the many types of potatoes to be star ingredients in your recipes; they add nutritional value and a variety of colors, flavors, and textures to your favorite dishes. Need inspiration? Take a lesson from Hungry Girl Lisa Lillien who is known for creating healthful recipes that never lack in flavor, just like her latest potato dish, Potato'zanella.

    A traditional panzanella salad calls for cubes of bread. This reinvented Potato'zanella uses potatoes instead of bread, a great substitution for those on gluten-free diets, and also keeps the dish light, fresh, and full of vegetables. It's easy—just toss together cherry tomatoes, cucumber chunks, spinach, red onion, basil, and a flavorful dressing with the halved fingerling potatoes to complete the dish. This twist on the traditional adds a punch of nutritional value to this tasty dish. 

    No matter what you serve this spring, don't forget the nutritional power of potatoes: one medium-size (5.3 ounce) skin-on potato contains just 110 calories per serving, boasts more potassium (620g) than a banana (450g), provides almost half the daily value of vitamin C (45 percent), and contains no fat, sodium, or cholesterol. With seven unique potato types and many ways to prepare them, you can enjoy potatoes every day of the week and substitute them into any dish. 

    Inspired by Hungry Girl's creative and guilt-free potato recipe? Hungry Girl and the USPB invite you to enter the Guilt-Free Potato Goodness recipe contest on the Potatoes, Taters & Spuds Facebook page. Simply submit your original, mouth-watering, and guilt-free potato recipe for the chance to win a trip for two to Los Angeles, CA, and a meet-and-greet with Hungry Girl Lisa Lillien at her brand-new Hungryland headquarters and test kitchen! Enter the contest by March 28, 2014. Check out the following site for official contest rules: 
    facebook.com/PotatoesTatersAndSpuds/app_325926694220428 

    >>Potato'zanella<< 
    Prep: 10 minutes 
    Cook: 30 minutes 
    Servings: 4

    Ingredients:

    Salad
    1 lb. fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise
    1 tsp. olive oil
    1/8 tsp. salt
    1 cup halved cherry tomatoes
    1 cup cucumber cut into chunks
    1 cup chopped spinach leaves
    1/2 cup chopped red onion
    2 tbsp. chopped basil

    Dressing
    2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
    1 tbsp. olive oil
    1/2 tsp. Dijon mustard
    1/2 tsp. chopped garlic
    1/8 tsp. each salt and black pepper

    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray a baking sheet with nonstick spray.
    Place halved potatoes in a large bowl. Drizzle with oil, sprinkle with salt, and toss to coat.
    Place potatoes cut sides down on the baking sheet. Bake until tender and browned, 25 - 30 minutes.
    Let cool slightly, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl, and add remaining salad ingredients. Mix well.
    In a small bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients. Drizzle over salad, and toss to coat. Dig in!
     

     

    Nutritionals per serving (about 1 1/3 cups): 150 calories, 5g fat, 175mg sodium, 25g carbs, 3.5g fiber, 3g protein

    Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140320/CG86029
    SOURCE: United States Potato Board
    RELATED LINKS: hungry-girl.com; potatogoodness.com

  • Beef Bone Broth

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Makes: 4 quarts

    5 pounds of beef soup bones

    2 bay leaves

    4 sprigs thyme

    3 tablespoons whole black peppercorns

    2 large yellow onions, quartered

    3 carrots, chopped

    2 celeriac, peeled and chopped

    4 cloves garlic, smashed

    1 cup red wine

    2 gallons water, plus more as needed

    Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Arrange the bones in a roasting pan in a single layer and roast for 45 minutes. Transfer the bones into a heavy stockpot. Toss in the bay leaves, thyme, peppercorns, onions, carrots, celeriac, and garlic. Pour in the red wine and water. Bring the liquid to a boil over high heat, then immediately lower the heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer for at least 12 and up to 18 hours, adding water as necessary to keep the bones submerged. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve, discarding the solids, and pour it into jars. Place it in the fridge and allow the fat to harden. You can remove the hard fat and use it for cooking. Use up the broth within a week, or freeze immediately. Source: The Nourished Kitchen by Jennifer McGruther

  • Local Rules

    There was a lot to like in the food projections at the beginning of this year. After perusing many different sources some distinct commonalities emerged—simple, healthy, farm-to-fork, hyper-local sourcing, and sustainability all rang out resoundingly across the food forecasts.

    Functional foods vs. superfoods

    This year in superfoods
    By Adam Swenson