Food & Recipes

  • Gluten-Free Lemon Tart

    Weekly Recipe: 
    Weekly
    [title]
    SERVES: 6-8

    Crust

    1/3 cup rice flour, plus extra for dusting pan

    1/3 cup potato starch

    1/3 cup tapioca starch

    1/4 cup sweet rice flour (also called glutinous rice flour)

    1 tablespoon xylitol

    ½ teaspoon xanthan gum

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    6 tablespoons cold, organic butter

    2 teaspoons vanilla extract

    1 large egg

    Filling

    2 large eggs

    2 large egg yolks

    2/3 cup xylitol

    Zest of 2 lemons

    2/3 cup lemon juice

    ½ cup crème fraiche or sour cream

    Powdered sugar

    Cut the butter into small pieces and return to the refrigerator until needed. To make the crust, start by heating your oven to 350 degrees. Coat a 9-inch tart pan with cooking spray and a dusting of rice flour. Combine the remaining flours and starches with xylitol, xanthan gum, and salt in a large bowl. Cut the cold butter into the mixture with the help of a pastry cutter, then work in the vanilla extract and egg.

    Once the dough has come together to form a ball, knead it briefly to finish, making sure to not overwork the dough or to melt the butter. Between two sheets of waxed paper, roll out the dough to a diameter of 12 to 13 inches. Peel the waxed paper away from one side of the dough and drape over the tart pan with the remaining sheet facing up. Peel back the second sheet, then press the dough into the pan, making sure it is even. Bake the empty shell for 10 minutes, then set aside to cool while you mix the filling.

    Whisk together the eggs, yolks, and sugar in a bowl, just until evenly distributed, then stir in the lemon zest and juice. Add the crème fraiche or sour cream last and whisk until the mixture becomes smooth. Fill the cooled tart shell with the lemon mixture and return the tart pan to the oven for 15 to 20 minutes, just until it is set. Remove from the oven and let it cool. Finish the tart with a dusting of powdered sugar.

  • Tofu Kale Lasagna

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 8

    5 – 7 sun-dried tomatoes

    12 lasagna noodles

    6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

    4 garlic cloves, minced

    1 large onion, chopped

    8 – 10 ounces cremini mushrooms, sliced

    2 pounds fresh firm tofu

    2 tablespoons mirin

    2 teaspoons dried basil

    2 teaspoons dried parsley

    2 bunches kale, finely chopped

    Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

    4 cups tomato sauce

    1 1/2 cups grated soy or rice mozzarella

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In a small bowl, soak sun-dried tomatoes in enough hot water to cover. When soft, drain, chop, and set aside. Cook lasagna noodles until just soft. Drain and set aside. In a large pot over medium heat, sauté garlic and onions in oil until soft. Add mushrooms and sauté three minutes. Drain tofu, wrap in towels, press to remove excess water, and crumble into pot. Add mirin, sun-dried tomatoes, basil, and parsley and sauté five minutes. Fold in kale, cover, and cook three minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper and remove from heat. Spread 1/2 cup tomato sauce over bottom of 9x12-inch lasagna pan. Place single layer of noodles over sauce and cover with half the kale mixture. Cover with 1 1/2 cups tomato sauce. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup soy mozzarella. Cover with another layer of noodles and remaining kale mixture. Add 1 1/2 cups sauce, 1/2 cup soy mozzarella, and final layer of noodles, then 1/2 cup sauce and remaining soy mozzarella. Cover tightly with foil and bake 35 minutes. Remove foil and bake 10 more minutes. Remove from oven and set aside for 10 minutes before serving. Source: Clean Food by Terry Walters, image by Gentl and Hyers, courtesy of Sterling Epicure

  • Chicken “Parmesan” with Simple Red Sauce

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Serves: 4

    Simple red sauce

    1 (28 ounce) can crushed tomatoes

    1 tablespoon olive oil

    2 cloves garlic, finely minced or pressed

    2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

    1/4 cup shredded Daiya vegan mozzarella

     

    1/4 cup cornstarch or tapioca starch

    3/4 cup gluten-free breadcrumbs (I prefer Ener-G)

    Salt and freshly ground pepper

    1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

    2 tablespoons rice milk

    6 tablespoons olive oil

    4 (4-ounce) chicken cutlets, 1/4-inch thick

    1/2 cup shredded Daiya vegan mozzarella

    Fresh basil for garnish

    Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. To make the sauce, combine all the ingredients for the sauce in a heavy pan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and cook for five minutes, stirring often. Set aside. Pour the cornstarch into a shallow bowl and set aside. Combine the breadcrumbs with some salt and pepper and the oregano in another shallow bowl; set aside. Pour the rice milk into a third shallow bowl. Whisk in four tablespoons of the olive oil, one tablespoon at a time, until you have a creamy emulsion. Turn one chicken cutlet in the cornstarch, coating both sides. Lift out, shaking off the extra cornstarch, and dip in the rice milk mixture, then turn in the breadcrumbs to coat. Set aside. Repeat with the remaining three cutlets.

    Heat one tablespoon of the olive oil in a large, heavy pan over medium-high heat until just starting to ripple. Add the cutlets and cook for two minutes, then add the remaining one tablespoon olive oil, turn the chicken, and cook for two minutes more. Transfer to a nonstick baking pan. Spray the tops of the cutlets with a little cooking spray and bake for five minutes. Meanwhile, rewarm the sauce over medium heat. Remove the baking pan from the oven, flip the chicken, and top each cutlet with two tablespoons of the sauce. Sprinkle the vegan mozzarella evenly over the cutlets and return to the oven to bake for eight more minutes, until the cheese has melted and is bubbling. Serve garnished with a few basil leaves. Source: Allergy-Free and Easy Cooking by Cybele Pascal

  • Glazed Baked Doughnuts

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Makes: 8

    1 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour with xanthan gum in mix

    1/2 cup sugar

    1/4 cup dried buttermilk powder

    4 teaspoons dried egg whites

    1 teaspoon baking powder

    1/2 teaspoon baking soda

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    2 eggs

    1/4 cup canola oil, melted butter, or nondairy alternative

    2 tablespoons water

    1 tablespoon vanilla extract

    Chocolate glaze (recipe follows)

     

    Chocolate glaze

    1 cup confectioners’ sugar

    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

    Pinch of salt

    1 tablespoon milk (regular or lactose-free) or nondairy alternative (almond, rice, soy), plus more as needed

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spray a nonstick doughnut pan with nonstick cooking spray. Also spray the inside of a one-gallon self-sealing plastic bag well with nonstick cooking spray. Cut a 3/4-inch diagonal off one corner. (If the corner is cut too large, the doughnut yield will be less.) In a two-quart bowl, place the flour, sugar, buttermilk powder, dried egg whites, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Whisk to mix well. In a separate two-quart bowl, place the eggs, oil or butter, water, and vanilla extract. Beat well with a handheld mixer. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix to combine with a silicone spatula. Let the batter rest for five minutes.

    Scrape the batter into the plastic bag, squeeze out the air, and seal. Push the batter toward the cut corner of the bag and, twisting the bag, pipe the batter into the doughnut pan, making a complete round (standard pans hold six doughnuts.) Bake for 10 minutes or until the doughnuts are brown on top and cooked through. Remove from the oven. Flip the doughnuts onto a cooling rack, then turn right side up. Place the cooling rack on a baking sheet or parchment paper to make cleanup easier when icing. Repeat with the remaining doughnut batter. Brush the doughnuts with the glaze while they are still warm. If using sprinkles, add now. Let the glaze dry until the doughnuts are completely cool. Wrap loosely and serve within two days, or wrap and freeze.

    To make chocolate glaze, place the sugar in a small bowl. Add the vanilla extract, cocoa, salt, and the one tablespoon milk; stir well. Add more milk only as needed. The glaze needs to be thin enough to spread with a pastry brush but thick enough to stick on the warm doughnuts. Source: Cooking for Your Gluten-Free Teen by Carlyn Berghoff, Sarah Berghoff McClure, Dr. Suzanne P. Nelson, and Nancy Ross Ryan

  • Yum! Why Beef, Butter, and Eggs Are Back on the Menu

    If you’ve banished red meats and egg yolks from your diet for health reasons, there’s reason to rejoice. I think the notion that saturated fat and cholesterol are the demons in the diet is 100 percent wrong. When you look at the data, it’s very clear: Most of what we’ve been told about saturated fat and cholesterol is simply not so.

    A surprising list of the new health foods—and some to avoid
    By Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, aka “The Rogue Nutritionist”
  • In Season: Lemons

    Lemons are poised to step into the spotlight this year, and the Eureka/Lisbon, Meyer, and seedless varieties are all in season now. Lemons originated in Southeast Asia and entered Europe via Southern Italy during the time of ancient Rome. Christopher Columbus introduced lemons to the West when he brought them to Hispaniola (modern Haiti) in 1493.

  • Meatless: Nut Cheese Delight

    Though going meatless doesn’t necessarily mean being vegan and raw, it doesn’t hurt to forgo animal products and heat from cooking every once in a while. And that brings us to nut cheese. Typical nut cheeses are made from Brazil nuts, cashews, and macadamia nuts. As the recipe below shows, you can easily use almonds and hazelnuts as well.

  • Tea for Your: Insomnia

    Spring is in the air, and daylight saving time is around the corner. While we all love our longer days, according to Michael J. Breus, PhD, the setting and resetting of the 24-hour cycle affects our circadian rhythm (our internal clock). By having to go to bed at a new “earlier” time than normal, we find ourselves unable to fall asleep or stay asleep.

  • Local Rules

    There was a lot to like in the food projections at the beginning of this year. After perusing many different sources some distinct commonalities emerged—simple, healthy, farm-to-fork, hyper-local sourcing, and sustainability all rang out resoundingly across the food forecasts.

    Functional foods vs. superfoods

    This year in superfoods
    By Adam Swenson
  • The Newest Superfruit

    Know what a buffaloberry is? If not, now is the time. According to new studies, buffaloberries contain high levels of lycopene and methyl-lycopenoate, both which are beneficial for our overall health. This tart red fruit is great fresh or dried. Go check it out and start reaping the benefits.