Food & Recipes

  • Tilapia Tortilla Stew

    4 tablespoons fresh lime juice,
    plus 1 tablespoon for sauce
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    3 tablespoons chopped cilantro,
    plus extra for garnish
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1 1/2 pounds US tilapia
    1 (16 ounce) jar tomato salsa
    1 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
    4 small handfuls broken tortilla chips
    1 tablespoon olive oil, for drizzling
    1 avocado, diced

    1. Mix 4 tablespoons of lime juice with garlic, cilantro, and salt in a large casserole dish. Lay the tilapia fi llets side by side atop the marinade. Let sit 15 minutes, turning once or twice to coat all sides.

    2. Bring salsa and chicken broth to a simmer in a large skillet. Add the tilapia with juices. Simmer 10 minutes, until fi sh is fi rm and opaque. Break the fi sh into large pieces with a wooden spatula.

    3. To serve, line four bowls with a handful of broken tortilla chips. Spoon stew over chips and drizzle with a touch of the remaining lime juice and olive oil. Garnish with avocado and cilantro

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 310 calories; 14.5 g fat; 1.7 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 34 g protein; 16.4 g carbohydrates; 4.5 g fi ber; 627 mg sodium

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