Food & Recipes

  • The Anti-Aging Diet

    Anti-aging. We see the term everywhere, from magazine covers and supplements labels to beauty creams and exercise regimes—all promising to make us look and feel younger. While you can’t avoid getting older, one thing is clear: The foods you eat play a crucial role in keeping your body healthy and your brain functioning well into your senior years.

    10 foods to help you look and feel younger
    By Lisa Turner
  • Get Your Game On

    If the warmer weather has you itchin’ to start grillin’—but you’re worried about the fat and cholesterol in burgers and steaks—there’s good news. Bison, elk, venison, ostrich, and grass-fed (as well as grass-finished) beef offer the flavor you crave with a lot less of the bad stuff—in fact, they have half the fat of chicken.

    Tasty reasons to think beyond beef
    By Ellen Jacobsen
  • The Well-Stocked Kitchen

    Each year, Americans spend an estimated $46 billion on diet products and self-help books. We fill our grocery carts with the foods these plans claim will help us lose weight and keep it off. And what does that mean for so many of us? We’ve got a pantry full of our best intentions and no clue what to do with them.

    Must-have foods for your panty, fridge, and freezer. And how to use them.
  • Move Over, Crudite

    New research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that cooking some veggies boosts nutrient levels. The study, which compared broccoli, carrots, and zucchini, found that boiling, steaming, and even frying actually increases the levels of certain groups of antioxidants.

    By Scott Boulbol
  • Garlic Curry Cauliflower

    1 large head fresh cauliflower, cut into florets
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1/2 cup yellow onion, diced
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh gingerroot, minced
    1 cup light coconut milk
    1 tablespoon curry powder
    1/4 teaspoon white pepper
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup fresh cilantro, minced

    1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
    2. In an 8-inch-square glass casserole, coat cauliflower with olive oil. Roast 10 minutes.
    3. Combine onion, garlic, ginger, coconut milk, curry powder, white pepper, and salt.
    4. Pour coconut milk mixture over the cauliflower, cover loosely with foil, and roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until cauliflower is tender. Remove from oven and stir in cilantro.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 186 calories; 13.5 g fat; 6.4 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 5.4 g protein; 15.6 g carbohydrates; 6.2 g fiber; 359.5 mg sodium

  • Green Tea and Ginger Salmon

    3/4 cup water
    1 3-inch gingerroot, grated
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    2 green tea bags
    2 teaspoons plus 2 tablespoons honey
    1 1/2 pounds wild Alaskan salmon, skin removed
    1 tablespoon white miso
    2 tablespoons Dijon or spicy brown mustard

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. Combine water and grated ginger into a small saucepan. Bring to a boil; remove from heat and add garlic, green tea, and 2 teaspoons honey. Cover and let brew for five minutes. Remove tea bags; set mixture aside.
    3. Place salmon in a baking pan and pour green tea mixture over fish. Cover loosely with foil and bake 12 to 15 minutes.
    4. Remove from oven and turn broiler to high. In a small bowl, combine miso, mustard, and 2 tablespoons honey. Spread mixture over fish and broil two minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 379.8 calories; 12.8 g fat; 2.7 g saturated fat; 96.9 mg cholesterol; 46.8 g protein; 15.2 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 408.7 mg sodium

  • Spinach and White Bean Salad With Sun-Dried Tomato and Basil Vinaigrette

    2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 tablespoon basil, minced
    1 tablespoon sun-dried tomato in olive oil, minced
    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and spun dry
    1 cup baby arugula leaves
    1 cup canned white beans, rinsed and drained
    1 cup sugar plum, pear, or grape tomatoes
    1/2 cup oil-cured black olives
    1/2 cup chopped walnuts
    1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese

    1. In a small bowl, combine mustard, balsamic vinegar, and minced garlic. Slowly whisk in olive oil to make a creamy emulsion. Whisk in basil and sun-dried tomato, and set aside.
    2. In a medium bowl, combine spinach, arugula, white beans, tomatoes, and olives. Drizzle with just enough vinaigrette to lightly coat leaves, and toss to mix. Season with salt and coarsely ground black pepper.
    3. Divide salad between four individual plates. Sprinkle each plate with walnuts and feta, if desired, and serve immediately with additional dressing on the side.

    Nutrition info per serving (4) (does not include feta cheese option): 333.6 calories; 25.2 g fat; 3.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 8.6 g protein; 21.3 g carbohydrates; 5.8 g fiber; 319.8 mg sodium

  • Ask The Doctor: Iron for Infants

    Not at all. Iron plays a vital role in your baby’s health by helping make hemoglobin, a complex protein that ferries oxygen around the body. Low levels of iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia, which can cause developmental problems.

    I’m worried about whether my infant gets enough iron. Am I just being paranoid?
    By Roy Steinbock, MD
  • Mixed Berry Sorbet

    [title]
    Cool off with this delicious summer treat

    Makes 1 quart

    6 cups fresh or frozen and thawed berries
    1/8 cup lemon juice
    1/2 cup soy milk
    1/3 to 1/2 cup honey
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    Low-fat Greek vanilla yogurt (optional)

     

     

    1. In a food processor, combine berries, lemon juice, soymilk, honey and salt; puree until smooth. Cover and refrigerate until chilled.
    2. Transfer to an ice cream maker and process according to directions. Serve immediately as is, or blend 1/4 cup yogurt into each 1-cup serving of sorbet for a creamier flavor and texture.

    Nutrition info per serving: 211 calories; 1.5 g fat; 0.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 2.8 g protein; 51.8 g carbohydrates; 9.1 g fiber; 166.4 mg sodium

  • In Season: Watermelon

    Nothing completes a picnic like a big chunk of watermelon. And while taste alone makes this fruit a standout, it’s a nutritional gem, too: One cup of watermelon delivers more than 21 percent of the daily value of vitamin C and 18 percent of vitamin A—in fewer than 49 calories.

    By Wendy McMillan