Food & Recipes

  • The Beauty Bar: Vitamin E's Antiaging Perk

    This free-radical fighter neutralizes the effects of pollution and protects lipid layers so your skin retains moisture and plumpness—keeping wrinkles away. It’s also been shown to decrease the risk of heart attack.

  • Easy Sugar Swap: Molasses

    Cutting back on the white stuff doesn’t mean having to skip sweets altogether. Molasses tastes great and is a nutritional powerhouse, loaded with manganese, copper, iron, calcium, potassium, magnesium, vitamin B6, and selenium—essentially all the good stuff that’s stripped out of sugar cane during the refining process.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • The Cayenne Cure

    Move the black pepper aside. Cayenne’s got a lot more flavor—and does more for your health than you might imagine. Malcolm Taw, MD, assistant clinical professor at the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, says research shows cayenne helps:

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Get Your Goat

    The glossy mustache advertisements and dancing-cow commercials might try to convince you that bovines have cornered the milk market, but there’s a whole other category in the dairy case that’s got as much—or more—nutritional game: goat’s milk.

    Why it's time to think beyond cow's milk.
    By Jeanette Hurt
  • Get Your Goat

    The glossy mustache advertisements and dancing-cow commercials might try to convince you that bovines have cornered the milk market, but there’s a whole other category in the dairy case that’s got as much—or more—nutritional game: goat’s milk.

    Why it’s time to think beyond cow’s milk.
    By Jeanette Hurt
  • Tilapia Tortilla Stew

    4 tablespoons fresh lime juice,
    plus 1 tablespoon for sauce
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    3 tablespoons chopped cilantro,
    plus extra for garnish
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1 1/2 pounds US tilapia
    1 (16 ounce) jar tomato salsa
    1 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
    4 small handfuls broken tortilla chips
    1 tablespoon olive oil, for drizzling
    1 avocado, diced

    1. Mix 4 tablespoons of lime juice with garlic, cilantro, and salt in a large casserole dish. Lay the tilapia fi llets side by side atop the marinade. Let sit 15 minutes, turning once or twice to coat all sides.

    2. Bring salsa and chicken broth to a simmer in a large skillet. Add the tilapia with juices. Simmer 10 minutes, until fi sh is fi rm and opaque. Break the fi sh into large pieces with a wooden spatula.

    3. To serve, line four bowls with a handful of broken tortilla chips. Spoon stew over chips and drizzle with a touch of the remaining lime juice and olive oil. Garnish with avocado and cilantro

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 310 calories; 14.5 g fat; 1.7 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 34 g protein; 16.4 g carbohydrates; 4.5 g fi ber; 627 mg sodium

  • Ginger-Garlic Kale With Tempeh

    1/4 cup reduced-sodium tamari
    2 tablespoons agave
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon dried, crushed red pepper
    1 3-inch segment gingerroot, grated
    1 8-ounce package tempeh, cut into
    1/2-inch cubes
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 small yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced
    1 bunch kale, stems removed and chopped
    2 tablespoons black sesame seeds

    1. In a small bowl, combine tamari, agave, garlic, and red pepper. Squeeze grated ginger over the bowl to extract juice; discard solids. Stir to mix well.

    2. Add tempeh to marinade, stir to coat, and let marinate for one hour at room temperature. Remove tempeh from marinade using a slotted spoon; reserve marinade.

    3. In a large skillet, heat oil, and sauté onion and marinated tempeh for fi ve to six minutes, until onions are tender.

    4. Wash kale, and shake dry. Add to pan, along with remaining marinade; cover and cook until kale is tender and bright green, three to four minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

    5. Transfer to individual plates, and sprinkle with black sesame seeds. Serve immediately.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 266 calories; 12 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 16 g protein; 28 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 651 mg sodium

  • Sneaky Sources of Gluten

    Here’s a guide to foods with hidden sources of wheat from Shelley Case, RD, author of Gluten-Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide (Case Nutrition Consulting, 2006) and a leading expert in the field.

    Food: Soy sauce
    The culprit: Wheat or hydrolyzed wheat protein

    It takes more than banning bagels and beer to purge gluten from your diet.
    By Lisa Turner
  • Broiled Grapefruit With Chai Spices

    1 small grapefruit
    2 teaspoons honey
    1/4 teaspoon cardamom
    1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
    1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
    1/8 teaspoon ground ginger

    Halve a small grapefruit, and use a small, sharp knife to loosen each section. Place cut side up in a shallow pan, drizzle each half with honey, and sprinkle with cardamom, cinnamon, ground cloves, and ground ginger. Broil for three minutes or until honey bubbles.

  • Selenium: Too Much of a Good Thing?

    Selenium supplements have been touted as possible cancer fighters, but taken over a long period they might also increase your risk of type-2 diabetes by up to 50 percent, says a recent study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Scientists wanted to examine whether selenium might prevent diabetes, since previous animal studies suggested it improves glucose metabolism.

    By Matthew Solan