Food & Recipes

  • New Ways to a Healthy Heart

    Cardiovascular disease caused more than one third of all deaths in the US in 2004, making it the nation’s No. 1 killer. Confronted with that grim statistic, one could venture we’ve been missing something. Two new studies suggest what that might be—fruits and vegetables full of vitamin C and a daily dose of sunshine.

    By Kris Kucera
  • Fatigue Fighters

    We all know that secret stash of chocolate or third cup of coffee won’t do our bodies any good, yet when fatigue sets in, who doesn’t reach mindlessly (and with a good measure of guilt) for a quick pick-me-up? Turns out there’s a biological reason for your lack of willpower: Your body is declaring its need for energy. Fast.

    6 foods that'll keep your energy high all day long
    By Wendy McMillan
  • Oil Change

    We should all know by now that nature’s given us good fats and bad fats, and that opting to eat only the good variety can help prevent everything from cardiovascular disease to cancer.

    by Pamela Bond
  • Healthy Pantru: Strawberries

    A bowl of this juicy, sweet fruit tastes too much like dessert to be such a nutrient-rich food, and yet new research shows strawberries may help prevent cardiovascular disease. “They are rich in anthocyanins, plant compounds that have a powerful anti-inflammatory effect,” says Shari Lieberman, author of The Real Vitamin and Mineral Book (Avery, 2007).

    By Lisa Turner
  • Oil Change

    We should all know by now that nature’s given us good fats and bad fats, and that opting to eat only the good variety can help prevent everything from cardiovascular disease to cancer.

    by Pamela Bond
  • Slim Down Before Summer

    Diet downfall #1
    You don’t really have a plan. “We’re constantly bombarded with new, trendy diets—but most of us get confused by all the mixed messages and don’t really follow just one plan,” says Rubin.

    Jordan Rubin, author of Perfect Weight America (Siloam, 2008), shares three reasons diets often fail—and simple fixes that can help you stay on track.
    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • In Season: Rainbow Chard

    A hybrid bred to produce colorful leaves and stems, rainbow chard also delivers a wide spectrum of nutrients. Topping the list are bone-building vitamin K and vision-enhancing vitamin A, magnesium, and vitamin C. A cup of chard also provides nearly 15 percent of your daily fiber needs. Here are three simple ways to prepare this good-for-you veggie:

    Simple Sauté

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Simple Ways To Sneak in Some Spice

    “When you look at your spice rack, you’re looking at opportunities for better health,” says Glen Aukerman, MD, director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Ohio State University Medical Center. Here’s how to add these healing spices to this week’s meals:
     

  • Get Supplement Savvy

    So you don’t eat the recommended five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Who does? Besides, if you’re like a third to a half of your compatriots, you’re taking a daily multivitamin to make up for any nutritional gaps you may have. Oh, you’re not doing that either? Well, don’t let those vitamin-laden shelves intimidate you.

    How to choose the right multivitamin for you.
    By Pamela Bond
  • Go With the (Whole) Grain

    We all know the benefits of whole grains—research has shown that eating the complete grain (including the bran, germ, and endosperm) prevents cancer, heart disease, and weight gain.

    Want to venture beyond oatmeal, brown rice, and wheat bread? Read on.
    By Lindsey Galloway