Food & Recipes

  • Watermelon Rind Pickles

    1 ound cubed watermelon rind
    1 cup white vinegar
    1 cup sugar
    4 cups water
    2 cinnamon sticks
    1 teaspoon ginger, grated
     

    1. Combine approximately watermelon rind, trimmed of dark green and pink, with white vinegar, sugar, water, cinnamon sticks, and grated ginger in a large stock pot.

    2. Bring to boil, reduce heat, and simmer until rind is near translucent, about an hour. Pack pickle and syrup mixture in sterilized glass jars, and chill 24 hours. Keep refrigerated.

  • Spinach and Watermelon Salad With Poppy Seed Dressing

    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 tablespoon lime juice
    2 teaspoons honey
    2 tablespoons rice vinegar
    1 teaspoon poopy seeds
    4 cups spinach leaves
    1/2 cup red onion, thinly sliced
    2 cups watermelon, cubed and seeded
    3/4 crumbed feta cheese

    1. For dressing, combine olive oil, lime juice, honey, rice vinegar, and poppy seeds.

    2. In a bowl, toss washed spinach leaves and red onion with dressing. Top with watermelon, and feta.

  • Mixed Berry Sorbet

    6 cups fresh or frozen and thawed berries
    1/8 cup lemon juice
    1/2 cup soy milk
    1/3 to 1/2 cup honey
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    Low-fat Greek vanilla yogurt (optional)

    1. In a food processor, combine berries, lemon juice, soymilk, honey and salt; puree until smooth. Cover and refrigerate until chilled.
    2. Transfer to an ice cream maker and process according to directions. Serve immediately as is, or blend 1/4 cup yogurt into each 1-cup serving of sorbet for a creamier flavor and texture.

    Nutrition info per serving: 211 calories; 1.5 g fat; 0.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 2.8 g protein; 51.8 g carbohydrates; 9.1 g fiber; 166.4 mg sodium

  • Sweet Spice

    Turns out you don’t have to eat five small meals a day to keep blood sugar levels stable: Research shows the polyphenol content in cinnamon actually mimics insulin and activates blood sugar regulator receptors. In a study, type-2 diabetics who took cinnamon powder capsules daily had 20 percent lower blood sugar than a control group.

  • The Anti-Aging Diet

    Anti-aging. We see the term everywhere, from magazine covers and supplements labels to beauty creams and exercise regimes—all promising to make us look and feel younger. While you can’t avoid getting older, one thing is clear: The foods you eat play a crucial role in keeping your body healthy and your brain functioning well into your senior years.

    10 foods to help you look and feel younger
    By Lisa Turner
  • Get Your Game On

    If the warmer weather has you itchin’ to start grillin’—but you’re worried about the fat and cholesterol in burgers and steaks—there’s good news. Bison, elk, venison, ostrich, and grass-fed (as well as grass-finished) beef offer the flavor you crave with a lot less of the bad stuff—in fact, they have half the fat of chicken.

    Tasty reasons to think beyond beef
    By Ellen Jacobsen
  • A Tune-up for Your Thyroid

    The thyroid, a small, butterfly-shaped gland below your Adam’s apple, pretty much rules your body, says Douglas Husbands, DC, CCN, a clinical nutritionist and chiropractor in San Carlos, California.

    This little gland plays a big role in your body. Keep it running with these essentials.
    By Victoria Dolby Toews
  • The Well-Stocked Kitchen

    Each year, Americans spend an estimated $46 billion on diet products and self-help books. We fill our grocery carts with the foods these plans claim will help us lose weight and keep it off. And what does that mean for so many of us? We’ve got a pantry full of our best intentions and no clue what to do with them.

    Must-have foods for your panty, fridge, and freezer. And how to use them.
  • Garlic Curry Cauliflower

    1 large head fresh cauliflower, cut into florets
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1/2 cup yellow onion, diced
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh gingerroot, minced
    1 cup light coconut milk
    1 tablespoon curry powder
    1/4 teaspoon white pepper
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup fresh cilantro, minced

    1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
    2. In an 8-inch-square glass casserole, coat cauliflower with olive oil. Roast 10 minutes.
    3. Combine onion, garlic, ginger, coconut milk, curry powder, white pepper, and salt.
    4. Pour coconut milk mixture over the cauliflower, cover loosely with foil, and roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until cauliflower is tender. Remove from oven and stir in cilantro.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 186 calories; 13.5 g fat; 6.4 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 5.4 g protein; 15.6 g carbohydrates; 6.2 g fiber; 359.5 mg sodium

  • Green Tea and Ginger Salmon

    3/4 cup water
    1 3-inch gingerroot, grated
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    2 green tea bags
    2 teaspoons plus 2 tablespoons honey
    1 1/2 pounds wild Alaskan salmon, skin removed
    1 tablespoon white miso
    2 tablespoons Dijon or spicy brown mustard

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. Combine water and grated ginger into a small saucepan. Bring to a boil; remove from heat and add garlic, green tea, and 2 teaspoons honey. Cover and let brew for five minutes. Remove tea bags; set mixture aside.
    3. Place salmon in a baking pan and pour green tea mixture over fish. Cover loosely with foil and bake 12 to 15 minutes.
    4. Remove from oven and turn broiler to high. In a small bowl, combine miso, mustard, and 2 tablespoons honey. Spread mixture over fish and broil two minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 379.8 calories; 12.8 g fat; 2.7 g saturated fat; 96.9 mg cholesterol; 46.8 g protein; 15.2 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 408.7 mg sodium