Food & Recipes

  • Soothe Arthritis, Tastefully

    Richard Blau, MD, author of Too Young to Feel Old: The Arthritis Doctor’s 28-Day Formula for Pain-Free Living (DeCapo, 2007) shares his top picks for foods that ease joint pain—and explains why they work.

    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Banana Ginger Muffins

    1 2/3 cup mashed ripe bananas
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 tablespoons blackstrap molasses
    1/4 low-fat plain yogurt
    2 egg whites (or 1 egg)
    1/4 cup skim milk
    1 cup plain fl our
    1 cup whole-wheat fl our
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1 teaspoon ground ginger
    1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 cup raisins

     

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Combine mashed banana, sugar, and olive oil in a bowl, mixing well. Add molasses, yogurt, egg whites, and milk. Set aside.
    3. In a separate bowl, combine flours, baking soda, and spices. Add banana mixture and stir well until combined. Fold in raisins.
    4. Pour into muffin tin greased with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving (12): 208 calories; 2.9 g fat; 0.5 g saturated fat; 0.4 mg cholesterol; 4.1 g protein; 44.1 g carbohydrates; 2.9 g fi ber; 118.6 mg sodium

  • Get Them Hooked on Veggies Young

    If children are going to learn to love vegetables and other good-for-you foods, it’s important to expose them to healthy fare early on. How early? Starting in utero and continuing through breast-feeding, says new research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Deep-Dish Whole-Wheat Pizza with Roasted Vegetables

    Dough
    1 tablespoon honey
    1 package active dry yeast
    1 cup warm water
    1 cup whole-wheat fl our
    1 1/2 cup flour

    Topping
    2 cups zucchini, thickly sliced
    1 red bell pepper, roughly chopped
    1 yellow bell pepper, roughly chopped
    1 medium red onion, sliced
    2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 tablespoon Italian seasoning
    1 16 oz jar tomato sauce
    3/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
    1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese (optional)

    1. To prepare dough, dissolve honey and yeast in warm water in a large bowl. Let stand five minutes. In a separate bowl, combine flours. Add to yeast mixture and stir to form a sticky dough. Place dough ball in a bowl coated with cooking spray and leave, covered, to double in size (about one hour).
    2. Preheat oven to 500 degrees. In a bowl, combine vegetables, balsamic vinegar, olive oil, and Italian seasoning. Stir thoroughly and spread on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes or until browned and tender.
    3. Coat a 9-inch by 13-inch baking pan with cooking spray. Press dough into pan.
    4. Spoon sauce evenly over dough. Cover with roasted vegetables and sprinkle with feta. If desired, sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Bake at 450 degrees for 20 minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving (not including parmesan cheese, serves 6): 291 calories; 7.3 g fat; 3.3 g saturated fat; 16.7 mg cholesterol; 10 g protein; 50 g carbohydrates; 6.4 g fiber; 751 mg sodium

  • Banana Ginger Muffins

    MAKES 12 GOOD-SIZE MUFFINS

    1 2/3 cup mashed ripe bananas
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 tablespoons blackstrap molasses
    1/4 cup low-fat plain yogurt
    2 egg whites (or 1 egg)
    1/4 cup skim milk
    1 cup plain flour
    1 cup whole-wheat flour
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1 teaspoon ground ginger
    1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 cup raisins




     

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Combine mashed banana, sugar, and olive oil in a bowl, mixing well. Add molasses, yogurt, egg whites, and milk. Set aside.
    3. In a separate bowl, combine flours, baking soda, and spices. Add banana mixture and stir well until combined. Fold in raisins.
    4. Pour into muffin tin greased with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving: 208 calories; 2.9 g fat; 0.5 g saturated fat; 0.4 mg cholesterol; 4.1 g protein; 44.1 g carbohydrates; 2.9 g fi ber; 118.6 mg sodium

  • Walk Off That Sugar

    Couch potatoes take note, especially those with type-2 diabetes—exercise may be the best way to manage your blood sugar. So what’s new about that? Anyone diagnosed with diabetes knows (or at least has been told) to lose weight, watch what they eat, quit smoking, and get regular exercise. But those same people will tell you how hard it is to make all those changes simultaneously.

  • Berry Good for You

    Long touted for their effectiveness in treating urinary tract infections, cranberries can now lay claim to even more bacteria-fighting prowess. Researchers at Massachusetts’ Worcester Polytechnic Institute have found that certain cranberry compounds alter E.

  • Full-Fat vs. Low-Fat Fare

    Three Times To Go Low:
    1. You’ve got cancer in your family. A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that women who limited their fat intake to 24 percent of their total daily calories were 40 percent less likely to develop ovarian cancer than women who got approximately 39 percent of their daily calories from fat.

    By Gina Roberts-Grey
  • New reason to Lay Off Red Meat

    Turns out smoking isn’t your only risk factor when it comes to lung disease. A study of more than 500,000 people age 50 to 71 found a link between eating red meat and this type of cancer. The study also associated red-meat intake with an elevated risk for cancers of the esophagus and liver. Why?

    By Meghan Rabbitt