Food & Recipes

  • Fermented Food Fest

    When most of us decide to add “good” bacteria to our diet, we typically turn to probiotic supplements and yogurt. Good choices to be sure, but not the only ones available. Look beyond the dairy aisle to fermented foods, which teem with healthy, good-for-you bacteria.

    Simply delicious and easy to make—and so good for your health.
    By Gretchen Roberts
  • 3 Foods That Fight Belly Fat

    Can’t seem to shed that spare tire around your middle, despite your best diet attempts? New research suggests that your belly fat itself could be to blame. In a study on rats, scientists found that fat cells within the abdomen produce a hormone called neuropeptide Y (NPY), an appetite stimulant previously thought to originate only in the brain.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • In Season: Watermelon

    Nothing completes a picnic like a big chunk of watermelon. And while taste alone makes this fruit a standout, it’s a nutritional gem, too: One cup of watermelon delivers more than 21 percent of the daily value of vitamin C and 18 percent of vitamin A—in fewer than 49 calories.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Mixed Berry Sorbet

    [title]
    Cool off with this delicious summer treat

    Makes 1 quart

    6 cups fresh or frozen and thawed berries
    1/8 cup lemon juice
    1/2 cup soy milk
    1/3 to 1/2 cup honey
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    Low-fat Greek vanilla yogurt (optional)

     

     

    1. In a food processor, combine berries, lemon juice, soymilk, honey and salt; puree until smooth. Cover and refrigerate until chilled.
    2. Transfer to an ice cream maker and process according to directions. Serve immediately as is, or blend 1/4 cup yogurt into each 1-cup serving of sorbet for a creamier flavor and texture.

    Nutrition info per serving: 211 calories; 1.5 g fat; 0.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 2.8 g protein; 51.8 g carbohydrates; 9.1 g fiber; 166.4 mg sodium

  • Grilled Sea Bass With Watermelon Salsa

    2 cups watermlon, diced
    2 tablespoons red onion, chopped
    1 cup cucumber, peeled, chopped, seeded
    1 tablespoon lime juice
    2 tablespoons minced cilantro
    2 sea bass filets
    2 tablespoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
    Pepper for seasoning

    1. In a small bowl, combine watermelon, red onion, cucumber, lime juice, and minced cilantro.

    2. Serve over two grilled sea bass fillets, rubbed with a mixture of olive oil, lemon juice, and a dash of pepper.

  • Sweet Spice

    Turns out you don’t have to eat five small meals a day to keep blood sugar levels stable: Research shows the polyphenol content in cinnamon actually mimics insulin and activates blood sugar regulator receptors. In a study, type-2 diabetics who took cinnamon powder capsules daily had 20 percent lower blood sugar than a control group.

  • Ask The Doctor: Iron for Infants

    Not at all. Iron plays a vital role in your baby’s health by helping make hemoglobin, a complex protein that ferries oxygen around the body. Low levels of iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia, which can cause developmental problems.

    I’m worried about whether my infant gets enough iron. Am I just being paranoid?
    By Roy Steinbock, MD
  • The Anti-Aging Diet

    Anti-aging. We see the term everywhere, from magazine covers and supplements labels to beauty creams and exercise regimes—all promising to make us look and feel younger. While you can’t avoid getting older, one thing is clear: The foods you eat play a crucial role in keeping your body healthy and your brain functioning well into your senior years.

    10 foods to help you look and feel younger
    By Lisa Turner
  • A Tune-up for Your Thyroid

    The thyroid, a small, butterfly-shaped gland below your Adam’s apple, pretty much rules your body, says Douglas Husbands, DC, CCN, a clinical nutritionist and chiropractor in San Carlos, California.

    This little gland plays a big role in your body. Keep it running with these essentials.
    By Victoria Dolby Toews
  • Spinach and White Bean Salad With Sun-Dried Tomato and Basil Vinaigrette

    2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 tablespoon basil, minced
    1 tablespoon sun-dried tomato in olive oil, minced
    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and spun dry
    1 cup baby arugula leaves
    1 cup canned white beans, rinsed and drained
    1 cup sugar plum, pear, or grape tomatoes
    1/2 cup oil-cured black olives
    1/2 cup chopped walnuts
    1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese

    1. In a small bowl, combine mustard, balsamic vinegar, and minced garlic. Slowly whisk in olive oil to make a creamy emulsion. Whisk in basil and sun-dried tomato, and set aside.
    2. In a medium bowl, combine spinach, arugula, white beans, tomatoes, and olives. Drizzle with just enough vinaigrette to lightly coat leaves, and toss to mix. Season with salt and coarsely ground black pepper.
    3. Divide salad between four individual plates. Sprinkle each plate with walnuts and feta, if desired, and serve immediately with additional dressing on the side.

    Nutrition info per serving (4) (does not include feta cheese option): 333.6 calories; 25.2 g fat; 3.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 8.6 g protein; 21.3 g carbohydrates; 5.8 g fiber; 319.8 mg sodium