Food & Recipes

  • Banana Ginger Muffins

    1 2/3 cup mashed ripe bananas
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 tablespoons blackstrap molasses
    1/4 low-fat plain yogurt
    2 egg whites (or 1 egg)
    1/4 cup skim milk
    1 cup plain fl our
    1 cup whole-wheat fl our
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1 teaspoon ground ginger
    1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 cup raisins

     

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Combine mashed banana, sugar, and olive oil in a bowl, mixing well. Add molasses, yogurt, egg whites, and milk. Set aside.
    3. In a separate bowl, combine flours, baking soda, and spices. Add banana mixture and stir well until combined. Fold in raisins.
    4. Pour into muffin tin greased with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving (12): 208 calories; 2.9 g fat; 0.5 g saturated fat; 0.4 mg cholesterol; 4.1 g protein; 44.1 g carbohydrates; 2.9 g fi ber; 118.6 mg sodium

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