Food & Recipes

  • Ulcer Cure

    Stress, fatty foods, and smoking certainly aren’t good for your health, but scientists are now finding they may not always be to blame when it comes to ulcers. Instead, research shows the culprit is bacterial infection.

    Is it true that honey can cure ulcers?
    By Nora Simmons
  • Baby Greens Salad With Almonds, Goat Cheese, Dried Plums, and Raspberry-Chipotle Dressing

    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup raspberry jam
    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
    1 to 2 small canned chipotle
    peppers, seeded
    6 cups mixed baby greens
    1 cup dried plums (prunes),
    chopped
    1/2 cup toasted almonds, chopped
    4 ounces goat feta cheese

    1. In a blender, combine olive oil, jam, vinegar, and chipotle peppers; purée until smooth, and set aside.

    2. In a medium bowl, combine greens, plums, and walnuts. Add just enough dressing (about half), and toss to mix.

    3. Divide among four salad plates, and top with goat cheese. Serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 349 calories; 19 g fat; 6 g saturated fat; 25 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 7 g fiber; 357 mg sodium

  • Papaya-Mint Fool

    2 cups fresh or frozen and thawed papaya cubes (mango may be subsituted)
    1/4 cup honey
    2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (about half a lime)
    2 teaspoons dried mint
    1/2 cup full-fat yogurt, plain or vanilla
    Fresh mint leaves for garnish (optional)

     

    1. In a food processor, combine papaya or mango, honey, lime juice, and mint, and pulse to make a very coarse puree.

    2. Transfer to a medium bowl, and fold in yogurt; add more honey to taste.

    3. Divide among four individual serving dishes, and refrigerate for one to two hours before serving, or freeze for 30 minutes. Garnish with fresh mint; serve with biscotti.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 111 calories; 1 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 4 mg cholesterol; 2 g protein; 25 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 22 mg sodium

  • Roasted Oysters and Black Olives With Rosemary

    1/4 cup olive oil
    4 medium garlic cloves, finely minced
    2 tablespoons finely minced fresh rosemary leaves
    2 cups shucked oysters, drained and patted dry
    2 cups kalamta olives (drained and rinsed)
    2 sprigs fresh rosemary

    Preheat to 400 degrees.

    1. In a small bowl, combine olive oil, minced garlic, and rosemary; stir to mix well.

    2. Add oysters, and stir to coat well. Add olives and mix.

    3. Arrange oysters and olives in a shallow baking pan, and roast for five to six minutes until oysters are cooked through.

    4. Remove from oven, and season with salt and pepper.

    5. Arrange on a serving platter with fresh rosemary sprigs, and serve immediately over angel-hair pasta tossed with olive oil, garlic, and minced fresh basil.

     

    nutrition info per serving (4): 300 calories; 26 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 66 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 8 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 588 mg sodium

  • Pan-Seared Tilapia With Grapefruit-Tarragon Sauce

    2 tilapia fillets
    Olive oil
    Salt and pepper
    1 medium grapefruit, juices from
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    1 tablespoons minced tarragon

    1. Rub two thick tilapia fillets with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and coarsely ground black pepper.

    2. In a large skillet, heat olive oil until hot, and sauté fillets for two minutes. Turn fillets over, and squeeze juice from one medium grapefruit over fish. Sprinkle each fillet with garlic cloves and minced fresh tarragon, cover pan, and cook two to four minutes longer, until cooked through.

  • Grapefruit-Blackberry Dressing

    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/ cup fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice
    1/4 cup whole-fruit blackberry preserves
    Arugula leaves
    1 mango
    Blackberries
    1 grapefruit, sectioned

    Whisk together olive oil, fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice, and blackberry preserves; serve over a salad of arugula leaves, mango and jicama cubes, blackberries, and grapefruit sections

  • Broiled Grapefruit With Chai Spices

    1 small grapefruit
    2 teaspoons honey
    1/4 teaspoon cardamom
    1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
    1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
    1/8 teaspoon ground ginger

    Halve a small grapefruit, and use a small, sharp knife to loosen each section. Place cut side up in a shallow pan, drizzle each half with honey, and sprinkle with cardamom, cinnamon, ground cloves, and ground ginger. Broil for three minutes or until honey bubbles.

  • Ginger-Garlic Kale With Tempeh

    1/4 cup reduced-sodium tamari
    2 tablespoons agave
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon dried, crushed red pepper
    1 3-inch segment gingerroot, grated
    1 8-ounce package tempeh, cut into
    1/2-inch cubes
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 small yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced
    1 bunch kale, stems removed and chopped
    2 tablespoons black sesame seeds

    1. In a small bowl, combine tamari, agave, garlic, and red pepper. Squeeze grated ginger over the bowl to extract juice; discard solids. Stir to mix well.

    2. Add tempeh to marinade, stir to coat, and let marinate for one hour at room temperature. Remove tempeh from marinade using a slotted spoon; reserve marinade.

    3. In a large skillet, heat oil, and sauté onion and marinated tempeh for fi ve to six minutes, until onions are tender.

    4. Wash kale, and shake dry. Add to pan, along with remaining marinade; cover and cook until kale is tender and bright green, three to four minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

    5. Transfer to individual plates, and sprinkle with black sesame seeds. Serve immediately.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 266 calories; 12 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 16 g protein; 28 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 651 mg sodium

  • Inside Scoop: Trans Fat Replacements


    Labeling loophole

    The rush to remove trans fats from fried, baked, and processed goods has never been more frantic. Even Dunkin’ Donuts and the Indiana State Fair have promised to use healthier frying oils. But are the “heart-healthy” changes everything they seem?
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Confessions of a Sugar Freak

    As far back as I can remember, I was tired. All of the time. No matter how much sleep I got, no matter how much coffee I drank, my fatigue simply overwhelmed me. I had a terrible time waking up. By late morning, I could hardly concentrate on my job. Mid-afternoon brought an intense urge to nap, and by early evening I was ready for bed.

    How I made the food-mood connection and eased my fatigue, anxiety, and depression.
    By Margaret Adamek, PhD