Food & Recipes

  • Pineapple-Date Ambrosia

    Serves 6 to 8

    1 cup Greek or regular plain, unsweetened yogurt
    4 to 6 tablespoons agave nectar (depending upon desired sweetness)
    4 cups diced fresh, ripe pineapple
    1 heaping cup chopped dates
    1 cup coconut flakes
    1/2 cup minced fresh mint leaves



     

    1. Mix the yogurt and agave together in a dish.

    2. Toss all remaining ingredients in a large bowl and gently blend in the yogurt. Let sit 10 minutes before serving to allow flavors to develop.

    Nutrition info per serving (based on 6 servings): 228.1 calories; 6.4 g fat; 4.9 g saturated fat; 5.3 mg cholesterol; 3.1 g protein; 44.3 g carbohydrates; 5.1 g fiber; 24.2 mg sodium

  • Global Warming's Effect on Your Dinner Table

    New research published in the journal Global Change Biology says that increased levels of greenhouse gases could decrease the nutritional values of several foods—including barley, wheat, soybeans, potatoes, and rice.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Alternative Medicine Cabinet: Fight Food Poisoning

    From fine dining to take-out Thai, Americans eat out much more than they used to—an average of four times every week. Food poisoning is also on the rise—it’s second only to the common cold in how frequently it strikes. Some 76 million Americans suffer from it each year.

    Bounce back faster with these gentle cures.
    By Victoria Dolby Toews, MPH
  • Whole-Grain Basil Bread

    1 packet of yeast (1 1/4 ounces)
    1 cup warm water
    1 cup basil, packed
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 tablespoon honey
    1 teaspoon garlic powder
    3 cups whole-wheat flour
    1 cup whole oats
     

    1. In a small bowl, dissolve a packet of yeast in warm water, and let stand.

    2. In a food processor, pulse basil with olive oil, honey, and garlic powder.

    3. Combine yeast and basil mixture with whole-wheat flour and whole oats. Knead into dough, and let rise, about an hour. Bake 30 to 35 minutes at 375 degrees.

    Quick Tip: For a savory pizza crust, eliminate the oats and reduce both honey and oil to 1 teaspoon.

  • Supps to Soothe Chemo Pain

    A natural sleep remedy, a tea extract, and a good ol’ multivitamin can help alleviate fatigue and pain among cancer patients, new research suggests. The study by researchers at Cancer Treatment Centers of America looked at 50 pancreatic cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. All were taking pain medication, but 36 also took green tea extract, melatonin, and multivitamins.

    By Lisa Marshall
  • Color My Rice

    And you thought choosing brown over white was all you needed to know when it came to rice. Turns out colored rice not only provides a fresh new palette for traditional rice recipes, it also serves up big nutritional benefits as well.

    Color: Red

    By Susan McDaniel
  • Basic Homemade Yogurt

    4 cups (1 quart) milk (skim, 1 percent,  2 percent, or whole)
    1/2 cup powdered milk (optional, for thicker yogurt)
    1/2 cup plain, live culture yogurt

    1. Heat milk and powdered milk (optional) over medium heat in a small saucepan to 180 degrees (use a candy thermometer), stirring frequently. Remove from heat, and let cool to 110 degrees (about an hour).

    2. Gently stir yogurt culture into milk, and pour mixture into a clean glass jar. Cover.

    3. Choose your incubation method:
    • Use a commercial yogurt maker (such as the Salton 1-quart yogurt maker).
    • Place jars in a hot water bath in the oven on its lowest setting (temperature should not exceed 110 degrees).
    • Pour hot water into a cooler, and incubate the jars in there, changing the water every few hours if necessary.

    4. Incubate yogurt at 110 degrees for four to 10 hours or until set. The longer you incubate, the more tart the yogurt will taste. The mixture needs to stay close to 110 degrees for the bacteria to do their job. Lower temperatures deactivate the cultures, and higher temperatures will kill them.

    5. Stir in sweetener, honey, or fruit as desired. Refrigerate up to two weeks.
    Quick tip: Homemade yogurt tends to be thinner than store-bought, but adding powdered milk to the mix will thicken it. Make sure the plain yogurt you buy to inoculate your homemade yogurt says “live and active cultures” on the label.

    Nutrition info per serving (using 1 percent milk and whole-milk yogurt): 121.2 calories; 3.4 g fat; 2.2 g saturated fat; 16.2 mg cholesterol; 9.3 g protein; 13.6 g carbohydrates; 0 g fiber; 121 mg sodium

  • Tasty Tricks for the Traveler

    Bites and Burns.
    Apply shredded carrots and potatoes to the skin, says Paul S. Anderson, ND, instructor of naturopathic medicine at Bastyr University in Seattle. These root vegetables draw interstitial fluid out of irritated tissues and provide moisture for healing.

    Traveler’s Diarrhea.

    Fight five on-the-road ailments with these foods.
    By Lora Shinn
  • Ragweed Relief

    August marks the unofficial start of ragweed season. If you’re one of the 36 million Americans who suffer from this evil cousin of the sunflower, steer clear of bananas, cucumbers, melons, and zucchinis, says Clifford W. Bassett, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine and otolaryngology at Long Island College Hospital in New York.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Want to Keep Your Metabolism Revved?

    Make sure you get enough calories each day. If you don’t, your body will sense the danger of starvation and actually slow down your metabolism, says Mark Hyman, MD, author of Ultrametabolism (Simon & Schuster, 2008). A quick way to figure out how many calories you need every day: Calculate your resting metabolic rate.