Food & Recipes

  • Toxic Herbs?

    A recent study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association found heavy metals, including mercury, arsenic, and lead, in some ayurvedic herbs. The study tested two types of ayurvedic medicines—herbal only and rasa shastra. “Rasa shastra is an ancient science that uses metals and minerals in combination with herbs.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • Veg Out

    Ask a roomful of vegetarians why they decided to make the meat-free leap, and you’ll likely get a roomful of answers. Some might love animals. Some might have ecological reasons. Some might have eschewed their steak-eating days to lose weight.

    Becoming a vegetarian can do wonders for your health—if you do it right
    By Bryce Edmonds
  • Sweet Potato, Carrot, and Onion Dip

    1 pound sweet potatoes, scrubbed
    1 medium carrot, peeled
    and thinly sliced
    1/2 medium onion, peeled and thinly sliced
    1 tablespoon tahini
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    1/2 teaspoon curry powder
    1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

    1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Wrap the sweet potatoes in foil, and roast for 50 minutes or until cooked through. Uncover, and let sit for 10 minutes. Remove the skin, and chop the potatoes into medium-size pieces.
    2. In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Add the carrot and onion, return to a boil, reduce the heat, simmer for 10 minutes. Do not drain; set aside.
    3. In a food processor, combine the sweet potato, the carrot-onion mixture with the cooking liquid, and the remaining ingredients. Puree until smooth. Refrigerate, covered, till ready to serve or for up to three days.

    nutrition info (per 1/4 cup): 63 calories; 0.9 g fat; 0.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 1.2 g protein; 12.9 g

  • Reclaiming Calm

    Once a bright student in his Gaza City classroom, 16-year-old Ahmed (name changed to protect identity) could no longer concentrate. His school performance took a nosedive after he watched Israeli soldiers kill his best friend. Images from that day haunted him: his friend’s body in pieces, his face ghostly white, and blood everywhere.

    Nightmares. Anxiety. Flashbacks. A traumatic event can trap you in a cycle of pain. Get your life back with these mind-body techniques.
    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Good Reason to Get More Greens

    Red produce like apples and peppers have gotten a lot of buzz lately thanks to their antioxidant-packed nutrition profiles, but that doesn’t mean you should give up your green veggies—especially if you worry about memory loss. A new study from the University of Illinois reports that celery and green peppers may prevent Alzheimer’s.

    By Nicole Ducnan
  • Natural Ways to Turn Down the Heat

    The holidays are always a good excuse to indulge in unhealthy foods—so it’s no surprise that a recent survey from The National Heartburn Alliance found that 37 percent of adults say they’re more likely to suffer from heartburn during this season than any other time of year.

    By Celia Shatzman
  • Seeds of Health

    Seeds contain nearly everything they need to start a new life: the embryo of a plant, the nutrients to sustain it, and a coat of armor to protect it. Small wonder then that they can add significant nutritional bang for the bite.

    These pods of new life can restore vitality to yours.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • In Season: Oranges

    Despite its leathery skin, an orange is actually a type of berry, which helps explain its juicy sweetness and long list of health-promoting nutrients. A medium orange contains 62 calories, 3 grams of fiber, and nearly 120 percent of the daily value of immune-boosting vitamin C.

    By Lisa Turner
  • The 2009 Get Healthy & Stay Healthy Guide

    We’ve all heard the same advice a million times, no matter what our health concerns: Eat better, exercise more, and stress less. But why is that so hard for many of us to do?

    While most nutritionists and doctors tell us to eat plenty of fruits, veggies, whole grains, and spices—they don’t really explain how we can do that in three meals a day.

    By Lindsay Wilson, Nicole Duncan, Erin Quinn, Kate Hanley
  • The Super Soaker

    Soaking brown rice overnight before cooking releases a compound called ASG (acylated steryl glucoside) that may help diabetics ward off disease-related nerve and vascular damage. New research in the Journal of Lipid Research shows that ASG helps normalize blood sugar by increasing levels of good enzymes that diabetes destroys.

    By Wendy McMillan