Food & Recipes

  • In Season: Oranges

    Despite its leathery skin, an orange is actually a type of berry, which helps explain its juicy sweetness and long list of health-promoting nutrients. A medium orange contains 62 calories, 3 grams of fiber, and nearly 120 percent of the daily value of immune-boosting vitamin C.

    By Lisa Turner
  • Eat to Beat the Blues

    Ever wonder why you can’t resist the urge to overdo it on unhealthy foods when you’re feeling down? Turns out there’s a physiological reason we eat too much bread, ice cream, and other “comfort” foods when we’re depressed: The sugar and carbs they typically contain give us a mental and physical lift.

    36 foods to stave off— and cure—depression.
    By Lisa Turner
  • Seeds of Health

    Seeds contain nearly everything they need to start a new life: the embryo of a plant, the nutrients to sustain it, and a coat of armor to protect it. Small wonder then that they can add significant nutritional bang for the bite.

    These pods of new life can restore vitality to yours.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • The 2009 Get Healthy & Stay Healthy Guide

    We’ve all heard the same advice a million times, no matter what our health concerns: Eat better, exercise more, and stress less. But why is that so hard for many of us to do?

    While most nutritionists and doctors tell us to eat plenty of fruits, veggies, whole grains, and spices—they don’t really explain how we can do that in three meals a day.

    By Lindsay Wilson, Nicole Duncan, Erin Quinn, Kate Hanley
  • What's My Alternative: Acupuncture for TMJ

    For more than a year, Nancy Moore, 60, of Bellingham, Washington, suffered from debilitating jaw pain. Constant jaw clenching and teeth grinding—a result of the stresses in Moore’s life—led her to develop temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ), a condition that occurs when the joint connecting the lower jaw to the skull becomes inflamed and limits jaw mobility.

    By Alyse Clacy
  • The Super Soaker

    Soaking brown rice overnight before cooking releases a compound called ASG (acylated steryl glucoside) that may help diabetics ward off disease-related nerve and vascular damage. New research in the Journal of Lipid Research shows that ASG helps normalize blood sugar by increasing levels of good enzymes that diabetes destroys.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Cranberry-Orange Quinoa

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    1 tablespoon grated orange peel
    1 tablespoons dried cranberries
    2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
    2 cups quinoa, cooked
    1/4 cup red onion, finely minced
    1 orange, cubed

    Add grated orange peel, dried cranberries, and chopped walnuts to cooked quinoa; add finely minced red onion and cubed segments of one orange

  • Cranberry-Orange Quinoa

    1 tablespoon grated orange peel
    1 tablespoons dried cranberries
    2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
    2 cups quinoa, cooked
    1/4 cup red onion, finely minced
    1 orange, cubed

    Add grated orange peel, dried cranberries, and chopped walnuts to cooked quinoa; add inely minced red onion and cubed segments of one orange

  • Cranberry-Orange Quinoa

    1 tablespoon grated orange peel
    1 tablespoon dried cranberries
    2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
    2 cups quinoa, cooked
    1/4 cup red onion, finely minced
    1 orange, cubed

    Add grated orange peel, dried cranberries, and chopped walnuts to cooked quinoa; add inely minced red onion and cubed segments of one orange

  • It's Easy Being Green

    Before you take that mid-afternoon java break, remember this: Feeling sluggish may be your body’s way of telling you your pH balance is off. Too much sugar, fat, and protein can make you overly acidic. When that happens, your body pulls calcium from your bones in an effort to correct the imbalance.

    By Nicole Sprinkle