Food & Recipes

  • No-Cook Massaged Kale

    1 bunch of kale, finely chopped
    2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2 tablespoons lemon juice, fresh
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    Tomato, avacado, chili powder (optional)

    In a large bowl, combine kale, extra-virgin olive oil, lemon juice, and sea salt. Using your hands, massage all the ingredients together—tenderizing the greens without having to cook them. Add tomato, avocado, and chili powder for a Mexican flair.

  • Steamed Sesame Kale

    1 large leek, sliced into 1/4-inch rounds
    1 head of kale, chopped into small pieces
    1 to 2 tablespoons extra-vigin olive oil
    2 tablespoons seasame seeds, toasted
    Tamari or soy sauce
    2 teaspoons ume plum vinegar or lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    1. In a large steamer, place  leek. Steam until translucent, mixing occasionally; then add one head of chopped kale. Steam just long enough so that kale is tender, but not soggy.

    2. Remove, and toss in bowl with extra-virgin olive oil, toasted sesame seeds, a few splashes of tamari or soy sauce, and ume plum vinegar or lemon juice. Salt to taste.

  • Cool Beans

    You know how that school-yard rhyme goes: Beans, beans, they’re good for your heart. But Donna M. Winham, a nutrition professor at Arizona State University who has conducted extensive research on beans’ impact on overall health, says this nutritious food protects more than your ticker.

    7 beans that prove good things do come in small packages
    By Wendy McMillan
  • Quinoa Vegetable Soup

    3/4 cup quinoa
    1 tablespoon canola oil
    2 onions, finely diced
    3 carrots, peeled and finely diced
    3 stalks celery, finely diced
    2 zucchini, finely diced
    1/2 cup yellow corn kernels
    1 red bell pepper, finely diced
    1 tablespoon minced garlic
    2 teaspoons sea salt
    12 cups low-sodium vegetable stock
    1 28-ounce can whole, peeled tomatoes
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    1/3 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
    Freshly ground black pepper

    1. Rinse quinoa well, and drain. Heat large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Add quinoa, and stir constantly for 10 minutes, or until the moisture evaporates and the quinoa crackles and becomes golden. Transfer quinoa to a bowl, and set aside.
    2. Heat oil in large, heavy stockpot over medium-high heat. Add onions, carrots, and celery. Sauté for 12 minutes. Add zucchini, corn, red pepper, garlic, and salt. Sauté 3 minutes longer, or until vegetables begin to release their juices.
    3. Add stock, cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in the toasted quinoa, and simmer over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes or until quinoa is almost tender.
    4. Squeeze the tomatoes into the soup, and add the juices from the can; then stir in the cumin and coriander. Simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until quinoa is tender.
    5. Stir in the cilantro, and season to taste with pepper and more salt, if desired.

    nutrition info per serving (10-12): 156 calories; 4 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 23 g carbohydrates; 152 mg sodium

  • 65 Percent: Osteoarthritis

    The amount of obese Americans who will develop osteoarthritis of the knee. This painful condition occurs when two bones rub against each other in the joint once the cushiony cartilage between them wears down, causing inflammation; being overweight can speed this process. Think you’re safe if you’re fit and trim? Not so fast—35 percent of you will develop achy knees too.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • In Season: Kale

    If kale’s rough texture and earthy flavor intimidate you, consider one more reason to step out of your comfort zone: This wild cabbage has more nutritional value in fewer calories than most foods you’ll find in the produce aisle. Rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A, C, and K, kale also has seven times the beta-carotene of broccoli and 10 times more lutein.

  • Fishy Findings

    If you favor fish in your diet for its health-boosting omega-3s, you need to take a hard look at where your fillets come from before you choose them.

    By Erinn Morgan
  • Egg-cellent News for Dieters

    Before you start yet another diet du jour, consider this: Eating two eggs a day for breakfast helps you lose 65 percent more weight and gain more energy than a bagel of equal calories, says a recent study from the International Journal of Obesity.

    By Nicole Sprinkle
  • Greek-Style Kale Salad

    3/4 pound kale leaves
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup lemon juice
    1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    Salt and pepper
    1/2 cup grape tomatoes
    1/3 cup kalamata olives, pitted
    2 ounches crumbled feta

    1. In a large pot of boiling water, blanch kale leaves until just tender, about 1 minute. Drain, and rinse under cold water to cool.

    2. Transfer kale to a clean kitchen towel, and press dry. Fluff up the leaves, coarsely chop, and transfer to a large bowl.

    3. In another bowl, combine olive oil with 1lemon juice,  crushed red pepper, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add grape tomatoes, kalamata olives, and crumbled feta to the kale.

    4. Add the dressing, and toss to coat. Great by itself, or chop finely and use as a stuffing for roasted red bell peppers.

  • Trans Fats Linked to Colon Cancer

    If saving your heart isn’t reason enough to avoid trans fats, how about keeping your colon healthy? New research from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill links high trans-fat intake with increased growth of polyps that can lead to colorectal cancer.

    By Nora Simmons