Food & Recipes

  • Splenda Makes You Fat

    What you stir into your morning cup of java may be increasing your waistline and creating a digestive imbalance. A small study published in the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health suggests that consuming Splenda—even within the limits set by the FDA—decreases healthy intestinal flora and causes weight gain.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Grapefruit for Hepatitis C

    Cutting edge research suggests that naringenin—the metabolized form of the natural flavonoid naringin, which gives grapefruit its bitter taste—may curb the spread of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) by up to 80 percent.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Say "C" to Stave Off Arthritis

    Eating vitamin C–rich foods may protect your knees from osteoarthritis, reports a recent study in Arthritis Research & Therapy. Here’s why: They’re packed with antioxidants, which protect cells from oxidative damage, and oxidative damage breaks down cartilage—the “shock absorber” in the knee joint.

    By Celia Shatzman
  • Grilled Cod With Black Bean–Mango Salsa

     

    4 1/2 pounds cod fillets
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin
    olive oil

    Black Bean-Mango Salsa
    Makes 6 cups

    1 lime
    1/2 orange, reserving zest
    1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
    1 teaspoon honey
    1 small, minced jalapeño pepper (optional)
    1 15 oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
    1 small mango, diced (1 cup)
    1/2 cup green onion, finely sliced
    1/2 cup chopped cilantro

    1. Mix together all black bean–mango salsa ingredients at least 30 minutes (and up to 24 hours) prior to serving.
    2. Lightly brush cod fillets on both sides with extra-virgin olive oil and grill 6 to 7 minutes on each side, until fish is opaque.
    3. Mound 1 1/2 cups of black bean mixture on a plate. Lean each piece of grilled cod against salsa.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 339.1 calories; 2.1 g fat; 0.4 g saturated fat; 93.5 mg cholesterol; 46.1 g protein; 33.6 g carbohydrates; 7.8 g fiber; 136.7 mg sodium

  • Dance Your Way to Better Health

    When it comes to getting your groove on, you may consider yourself among the rhythm-challenged, with two left feet and a repertoire confined to wedding-induced displays of the funky chicken. The words fun and dance have never gone together in your mind. But lock the door, close the blinds, and give it a try with no one else around because dancing truly is an easy way to get into shape.

    From ballet to Bollywood, find your fitness groove.
    By Karen Asp
  • Head Case

    When a headache strikes, you probably don’t care what kind you have; you just want it to go away—fast. But before you head for your medicine cabinet, try doing a little detective work first. Why? Because aspirin or anti-inflammatory drugs may not be the best cure.

    Knowing what type of headache you have will help you find relief once and for all.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • The Scary Truth About Statins

    The notion that high cholesterol causes heart disease has allowed doctors to write millions of prescriptions for cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins that can reduce the risk of it. That seemingly indisputable notion has long suffered from an inconvenient fact: Half the people who have a heart attack don’t have high cholesterol.

    What you need to know before you fill that prescription
    By Erin Quinn
  • Better Berries to Fight Cancer

    The next time you toss a handful of berries into your morning smoothie, reach for freeze-dried instead of fresh or frozen. Science now indicates that freeze-dried berries, specifically black raspberries, inhibit cancer development by restoring hundreds of cancer-altered genes to their normal state.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • The Healthy Heart Diet

    When Mary Anne Nally of Southold, New York, went for her annual physical, she feared what her doctor might say when he saw her blood-test results. “High cholesterol runs in my family, and even though I eat a relatively healthy diet, I had a sneaking suspicion mine was high too,” says the 54-year-old.

    By Lambeth Hochwald / Recipes by Maria Cooper
  • Grain and Vegetable "Meat" Loaf

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    1 cup millet
    2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce
    1 1/2 cups soy granules
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon minced garlic
    1 teaspoon minced shallots
    1 cup chopped onions
    1 cup chopped zucchini
    1/2 cup chopped red bell peppers
    1/2 cup white wine
    1 teaspoon ground coriander
    1/4 cup julienned fresh basil
    1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
    2 teaspoons of tamari soy sauce
    1 cup cooked brown rice
    1 1/2 cups cooked lentils, pureed
    2 tablespoons egg whites (from 1 egg)
    Sea salt to taste
    Freshly ground black pepper to taste

    1. Simmer the millet in 2-1/2 cups of water for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat, cover, and let stand for 20 minutes. Fluff the millet with a fork before using.
    2. Meanwhile, in another saucepan, bring 1 cup of water to a boil with the soy sauce. Add the soy granules. Remove the pot from the heat, and let it sit covered for 10 minutes. Fluff the granules with a fork before using.
    3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat the olive oil. Add the garlic and shallots, and cook, stirring, until golden, about 1 minute. Add the onions, zucchini, and red peppers, and cook, stirring, for 4 to 6 minutes. Add the wine, coriander, basil, and parsley. Simmer until the liquid is reduced 75 percent, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a mixing bowl.
    4. Mix soy sauce into cooked rice.
    5. Add the rice, lentils, soy granules, millet, and egg white to the sautéed vegetables, and season with salt and black pepper to taste. Mix thoroughly.
    6. Spray a nonstick loaf pan with canola oil spray, and firmly press the mixture into the pan. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes. Let cool for 20 to 30 minutes before slicing.

    nutrition info (8): 236.1 calories; 3.2 g fat;1.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 23.6 g protein; 33.9 g carbohydrates; 276 mg sodium