Food & Recipes

  • Ode to an Olive

    In the late spring, throughout the rocky terrain of the Mediterranean, the gnarled limbs of the Olea europaea tree begin to bud with olives. Too bitter to eat right off the tree, they’re first fermented and cured in oil, salt, or brine (a combination of salt and water or wine). The method and ingredients determine the olive’s final flavor, texture, and color.

    These little fruits are as nutritious as they are tasty.
    By Lisa Turner
  • King of the Soups

    Chicken soup not only soothes your soul, it can lower your blood pressure, clear nasal clog, reduce inflammation—and even help you lose weight. (Is this a perfect food or what?) Research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry revealed that the collagen proteins in chicken produced a significant and prolonged decrease in blood pressure (at least in rats).

    By Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen
  • Supplement Watch: Acetyl-L-carnitine

    Walk out of the grocery store and can’t find your car? Left your keys in the front door—again? Age-related forgetfulness can be maddening, so you’ll want to write this one down: acetyl-L-carnitine. Research shows this amino acid can boost brainpower and memory.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • I Heart Garlic

    This Valentine’s Day don’t let the prospect of smooch-repelling garlic breath keep you from protecting your heart. Garlic, specifically a compound called allicin, helps control high blood pressure (aka hypertension)—a dangerous condition that afflicts one in five Americans and increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Good Nuts to Crack

    Wish you could ditch your snack attacks? Maybe you don’t need to after all. Research shows munching on smaller meals throughout the day can actually help you shed pounds—but only if you choose wisely.

    From almonds to pistachios, tasty munchies to boost your health.
    By Molly Lyons
  • Don't Drink the Water

    Even though bottled water costs 2,000 times more than tap, many of us happily pony up, believing we’re paying for purity (cue images of picturesque mountain springs and tropical aquifers). But turns out we might not be.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • In Season: Belgian Endive

    This pleasantly bitter but slightly sweet member of the chicory family is at its peak from November to April. With only one calorie per leaf, this fat-, sodium-, and cholesterol-free vegetable provides an excellent source of folate and heart-healthy potassium.

    By Stacy Brugeman
  • Oatmeal Raisin Pancakes

    1 1/2 cups quick oats
    1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
    2 tablespoons wheat germ
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 tablespoon cinnamon
    3 tablespoons brown sugar
    3/4 cup raisins
    3 egg whites
    1 1/2 cups skim milk (or nondairy alternative)
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    2 ripe bananas, mashed (microwave 20 seconds if not very ripe)
    1/4 cup nonfat plain yogurt
    Nonstick cooking spray

    1. Mix dry ingredients in large bowl and create a well in the center.
    2. Whisk together wet ingredients, and pour into the well and blend.
    3. Heat a large non-stick skillet to medium–high heat, and cover with non-stick spray. Pour 1/4 cup portions onto pan and cook approximately 2 to 4 minutes on each side. Serve with a sprinkle of powdered sugar.

    nutrition info (per pancake): 93.4 calories; 0.7 g fat; 0.2 g saturated fat; 0.5 mg cholesterol; 3.6 g protein; 19.4 g carbohydrates; 1.9 g fiber; 163.1 mg sodium

  • Vegetable Frittata

    1 tablespoon olive or canola oil
    2 cups sliced mushrooms
    1 medium, julienned red pepper (1 cup)
    2 cups minced broccoli
    1/4 teaspoon dry thyme
    2 cups chopped spinach

    Whisk and set aside:
    12 egg whites
    3 tablespoons skim milk
    (or nondairy alternative)
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon black pepper
    3 tablespoons chives, chopped,
    reserve 1 tablespoon for garnish
    3 oz crumbled goat cheese, reserve
    1 oz for garnish

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms in an even layer, and do not move them for
    3 minutes. Stir, and continue to sauté for about 5 more minutes until they are browned.
    3. Add red pepper, broccoli, and thyme and sauté
    3 to 5 more minutes; add 2 to 4 tablespoons of water if vegetables begin to stick. Add spinach, and toss until wilted.
    4. Spray a 9-inch pie pan with nonstick spray. Sprinkle goat cheese and chives on bottom of pan, then add vegetables. Pour egg whites on top and bake for 25 minutes, uncovered. Cover with foil and bake 10 more minutes. Remove from oven and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Garnish with crumbled goat cheese and chopped chives.

    nutrition info per serving (4-6): 216 calories; 11. 4 g fat; 5.8 g saturated fat; 22.3 mg cholesterol; 22.3 g protein; 7.5 g carbohydrates; 2.8 g fiber; 564.6 mg sodium

  • Dark Chocolate & Date Truffles

    1 bag or bar of dark chocolate (12 oz)
    1 2/3 cups raw cashews
    8 oz dates, finely chopped
    1/4 teaspoon sea salt
    Zest of 1/2 of an orange

    1. Melt chocolate in double boiler until just melted.
    2. Meanwhile, blend 2/3 cups cashews with 2/3 cups water in blender on high for 30 seconds. Chop remaining cashews and set aside.
    3. Fold together melted chocolate, cashew mixture, dates, sea salt, and orange zest.
    4. Refrigerate until firm, approximately 45 minutes. Roll 3/4-inch balls in hands and then in chopped cashews. Refrigerate until ready to serve. (Note: Truffles will keep in freezer up to 1 month.

    nutrition info per truffle: 105 calories; 5 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 1 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 15 g carbohydrates; 1.5 g fiber; 5 mg sodium