Food & Recipes

  • Grilled Cod With Black Bean–Mango Salsa

     

    4 1/2 pounds cod fillets
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin
    olive oil

    Black Bean-Mango Salsa
    Makes 6 cups

    1 lime
    1/2 orange, reserving zest
    1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
    1 teaspoon honey
    1 small, minced jalapeño pepper (optional)
    1 15 oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
    1 small mango, diced (1 cup)
    1/2 cup green onion, finely sliced
    1/2 cup chopped cilantro

    1. Mix together all black bean–mango salsa ingredients at least 30 minutes (and up to 24 hours) prior to serving.
    2. Lightly brush cod fillets on both sides with extra-virgin olive oil and grill 6 to 7 minutes on each side, until fish is opaque.
    3. Mound 1 1/2 cups of black bean mixture on a plate. Lean each piece of grilled cod against salsa.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 339.1 calories; 2.1 g fat; 0.4 g saturated fat; 93.5 mg cholesterol; 46.1 g protein; 33.6 g carbohydrates; 7.8 g fiber; 136.7 mg sodium

  • The Healthy Heart Diet

    When Mary Anne Nally of Southold, New York, went for her annual physical, she feared what her doctor might say when he saw her blood-test results. “High cholesterol runs in my family, and even though I eat a relatively healthy diet, I had a sneaking suspicion mine was high too,” says the 54-year-old.

    By Lambeth Hochwald / Recipes by Maria Cooper
  • Dark Chocolate & Date Truffles

    1 bag or bar of dark chocolate (12 oz)
    1 2/3 cups raw cashews
    8 oz dates, finely chopped
    1/4 teaspoon sea salt
    Zest of 1/2 of an orange

    1. Melt chocolate in double boiler until just melted.
    2. Meanwhile, blend 2/3 cups cashews with 2/3 cups water in blender on high for 30 seconds. Chop remaining cashews and set aside.
    3. Fold together melted chocolate, cashew mixture, dates, sea salt, and orange zest.
    4. Refrigerate until firm, approximately 45 minutes. Roll 3/4-inch balls in hands and then in chopped cashews. Refrigerate until ready to serve. (Note: Truffles will keep in freezer up to 1 month.

    nutrition info per truffle: 105 calories; 5 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 1 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 15 g carbohydrates; 1.5 g fiber; 5 mg sodium

  • Steamed Sesame Kale

    1 large leek, sliced into 1/4-inch rounds
    1 head of kale, chopped into small pieces
    1 to 2 tablespoons extra-vigin olive oil
    2 tablespoons seasame seeds, toasted
    Tamari or soy sauce
    2 teaspoons ume plum vinegar or lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    1. In a large steamer, place  leek. Steam until translucent, mixing occasionally; then add one head of chopped kale. Steam just long enough so that kale is tender, but not soggy.

    2. Remove, and toss in bowl with extra-virgin olive oil, toasted sesame seeds, a few splashes of tamari or soy sauce, and ume plum vinegar or lemon juice. Salt to taste.

  • 65 Percent: Osteoarthritis

    The amount of obese Americans who will develop osteoarthritis of the knee. This painful condition occurs when two bones rub against each other in the joint once the cushiony cartilage between them wears down, causing inflammation; being overweight can speed this process. Think you’re safe if you’re fit and trim? Not so fast—35 percent of you will develop achy knees too.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Good Reason to Get More Greens

    Red produce like apples and peppers have gotten a lot of buzz lately thanks to their antioxidant-packed nutrition profiles, but that doesn’t mean you should give up your green veggies—especially if you worry about memory loss. A new study from the University of Illinois reports that celery and green peppers may prevent Alzheimer’s.

    By Nicole Ducnan
  • Reclaiming Calm

    Once a bright student in his Gaza City classroom, 16-year-old Ahmed (name changed to protect identity) could no longer concentrate. His school performance took a nosedive after he watched Israeli soldiers kill his best friend. Images from that day haunted him: his friend’s body in pieces, his face ghostly white, and blood everywhere.

    Nightmares. Anxiety. Flashbacks. A traumatic event can trap you in a cycle of pain. Get your life back with these mind-body techniques.
    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Cool Beans

    You know how that school-yard rhyme goes: Beans, beans, they’re good for your heart. But Donna M. Winham, a nutrition professor at Arizona State University who has conducted extensive research on beans’ impact on overall health, says this nutritious food protects more than your ticker.

    7 beans that prove good things do come in small packages
    By Wendy McMillan
  • Veg Out

    Ask a roomful of vegetarians why they decided to make the meat-free leap, and you’ll likely get a roomful of answers. Some might love animals. Some might have ecological reasons. Some might have eschewed their steak-eating days to lose weight.

    Becoming a vegetarian can do wonders for your health—if you do it right
    By Bryce Edmonds
  • Toxic Herbs?

    A recent study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association found heavy metals, including mercury, arsenic, and lead, in some ayurvedic herbs. The study tested two types of ayurvedic medicines—herbal only and rasa shastra. “Rasa shastra is an ancient science that uses metals and minerals in combination with herbs.

    By Lindsay Wilson