Food & Recipes

  • Cranberry-Orange Quinoa

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    1 tablespoon grated orange peel
    1 tablespoons dried cranberries
    2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
    2 cups quinoa, cooked
    1/4 cup red onion, finely minced
    1 orange, cubed

    Add grated orange peel, dried cranberries, and chopped walnuts to cooked quinoa; add finely minced red onion and cubed segments of one orange

  • Eat to Beat the Blues

    Ever wonder why you can’t resist the urge to overdo it on unhealthy foods when you’re feeling down? Turns out there’s a physiological reason we eat too much bread, ice cream, and other “comfort” foods when we’re depressed: The sugar and carbs they typically contain give us a mental and physical lift.

    36 foods to stave off— and cure—depression.
    By Lisa Turner
  • In Season: Kiwi

    Tired of apples, pears, and other fall fruits? Slice open a kiwi. This fuzzy piece of produce is packed with heart-healthy nutrients like potassium, magnesium, and vitamins C and E. Research shows eating kiwis daily may help prevent heart disease and stroke by limiting the blood’s ability to form life-threatening clots and by lowering triglycerides—fats that thicken the blood.

    By Beth Bence Reinke
  • Fight Cavities With ... Candy?

    It’s true! A Swedish study reports that eating gummy bears containing xylitol, a natural sugar found in the white birch tree, helps prevent cavity-causing plaque buildup. “Xylitol also reduces levels of bacteria in the mouth that break down tooth enamel and can lead to cavities,” says Harold Katz, DDS, in Los Angeles.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Go Nuts

    Turns out it might not be an apple a day that keeps the doc away: A new study in the Journal of Nutrition reports that eating a handful of nuts five or more times a week can reduce your risk of developing heart disease. Reach for almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, and walnuts, says Sari Greaves, RD, a nutritionist in Bedminster, New Jersey.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Fabulous Fungi

    Grow up in a household where Mom used mushrooms only one way, if at all—chopping up the white, button variety and tossing the bits into a casserole? It’s time to branch out if you haven’t already.

    Mushrooms work like magic when it comes to warding off disease.
    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Molasses Cutout Cookies

    1 1/4 cup flour, plus extra for dusting
    1/2 cup whole wheat flour
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
    6 tablespoons butter, softened
    1/2 cup molasses
    1/4 cup date sugar
    1 large egg
    2 tablespoons orange juice concentrate
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1/2 cup ground walnuts
    1 tablespoon fruit-only preserve

    (TIP: To substitute agave nectar for date sugar, increase regular flour by 1/4 to 1/2 cup—enough to make dough less sticky.)

    1. Whisk flours, baking soda, and spices in a bowl, and set aside.
    2. Beat butter, molasses, and date sugar with a mixer until fluffy. Reduce speed, and add egg, orange juice, and vanilla.
    3. Gradually stir in flour mixture until combined. Shape into a ball, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate an hour or more.
    4. Roll out dough on a floured surface, and cut as desired. Place on baking sheets, and bake at 350 degrees for 7 to 8 minutes.
    5. Decorate with nuts and preserves.

    Nutrition info per serving (1 cookie): 67 calories; 2 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 10 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 12 g carbohydrates; 0 g fiber; 6 mg sodium

  • Healthy Diet, Healthy Career

    Dining at the office vending machine may do more than sabotage your diet: Poor eating habits could also affect your career. A recent survey from ComPsych Corporation found that employees who ate a balanced diet were 10 times more likely to sustain high energy levels throughout the workday than those who ate junk food or skipped meals altogether.

    By Elizabeth Gregg
  • Sweet Tidings

    Walk into Mani’s,a popular Los Angeles bakery, and the chocolate-filled cookies, rich brownies, and cakes might have you mentally kissing your healthy eating habits good-bye. But stick around long enough and you’ll discover that the delicious-looking sweets lining the cases in front of you don’t have a bit of refined sugar in them.

    You can avoid sugar and still indulge with these all-natural alternatives.
    By Wendy McMillan
  • Chocolate-Orange Sauce

    1/2 cup cocoa powder
    1/2 cup agave nectar
    1 tablespoon cornstarch
    1 cup evaporated skim milk
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    2 teaspoons grated orange zest

    Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan, mixing well. Cook over medium heat, stirring continuously. Serve as a dip for fruit.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 146 calories; 2 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 3 mg cholesterol; 7 g protein; 31 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 76 mg sodium