Food & Recipes

  • Steamed Sesame Kale

    1 large leek, sliced into 1/4-inch rounds
    1 head of kale, chopped into small pieces
    1 to 2 tablespoons extra-vigin olive oil
    2 tablespoons seasame seeds, toasted
    Tamari or soy sauce
    2 teaspoons ume plum vinegar or lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    1. In a large steamer, place  leek. Steam until translucent, mixing occasionally; then add one head of chopped kale. Steam just long enough so that kale is tender, but not soggy.

    2. Remove, and toss in bowl with extra-virgin olive oil, toasted sesame seeds, a few splashes of tamari or soy sauce, and ume plum vinegar or lemon juice. Salt to taste.

  • Greek-Style Kale Salad

    3/4 pound kale leaves
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup lemon juice
    1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    Salt and pepper
    1/2 cup grape tomatoes
    1/3 cup kalamata olives, pitted
    2 ounches crumbled feta

    1. In a large pot of boiling water, blanch kale leaves until just tender, about 1 minute. Drain, and rinse under cold water to cool.

    2. Transfer kale to a clean kitchen towel, and press dry. Fluff up the leaves, coarsely chop, and transfer to a large bowl.

    3. In another bowl, combine olive oil with 1lemon juice,  crushed red pepper, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add grape tomatoes, kalamata olives, and crumbled feta to the kale.

    4. Add the dressing, and toss to coat. Great by itself, or chop finely and use as a stuffing for roasted red bell peppers.

  • Quinoa Vegetable Soup

    3/4 cup quinoa
    1 tablespoon canola oil
    2 onions, finely diced
    3 carrots, peeled and finely diced
    3 stalks celery, finely diced
    2 zucchini, finely diced
    1/2 cup yellow corn kernels
    1 red bell pepper, finely diced
    1 tablespoon minced garlic
    2 teaspoons sea salt
    12 cups low-sodium vegetable stock
    1 28-ounce can whole, peeled tomatoes
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    1/3 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
    Freshly ground black pepper

    1. Rinse quinoa well, and drain. Heat large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Add quinoa, and stir constantly for 10 minutes, or until the moisture evaporates and the quinoa crackles and becomes golden. Transfer quinoa to a bowl, and set aside.
    2. Heat oil in large, heavy stockpot over medium-high heat. Add onions, carrots, and celery. Sauté for 12 minutes. Add zucchini, corn, red pepper, garlic, and salt. Sauté 3 minutes longer, or until vegetables begin to release their juices.
    3. Add stock, cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in the toasted quinoa, and simmer over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes or until quinoa is almost tender.
    4. Squeeze the tomatoes into the soup, and add the juices from the can; then stir in the cumin and coriander. Simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until quinoa is tender.
    5. Stir in the cilantro, and season to taste with pepper and more salt, if desired.

    nutrition info per serving (10-12): 156 calories; 4 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 23 g carbohydrates; 152 mg sodium

  • Grain and Vegetable "Meat" Loaf

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    1 cup millet
    2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce
    1 1/2 cups soy granules
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon minced garlic
    1 teaspoon minced shallots
    1 cup chopped onions
    1 cup chopped zucchini
    1/2 cup chopped red bell peppers
    1/2 cup white wine
    1 teaspoon ground coriander
    1/4 cup julienned fresh basil
    1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
    2 teaspoons of tamari soy sauce
    1 cup cooked brown rice
    1 1/2 cups cooked lentils, pureed
    2 tablespoons egg whites (from 1 egg)
    Sea salt to taste
    Freshly ground black pepper to taste

    1. Simmer the millet in 2-1/2 cups of water for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat, cover, and let stand for 20 minutes. Fluff the millet with a fork before using.
    2. Meanwhile, in another saucepan, bring 1 cup of water to a boil with the soy sauce. Add the soy granules. Remove the pot from the heat, and let it sit covered for 10 minutes. Fluff the granules with a fork before using.
    3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat the olive oil. Add the garlic and shallots, and cook, stirring, until golden, about 1 minute. Add the onions, zucchini, and red peppers, and cook, stirring, for 4 to 6 minutes. Add the wine, coriander, basil, and parsley. Simmer until the liquid is reduced 75 percent, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a mixing bowl.
    4. Mix soy sauce into cooked rice.
    5. Add the rice, lentils, soy granules, millet, and egg white to the sautéed vegetables, and season with salt and black pepper to taste. Mix thoroughly.
    6. Spray a nonstick loaf pan with canola oil spray, and firmly press the mixture into the pan. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes. Let cool for 20 to 30 minutes before slicing.

    nutrition info (8): 236.1 calories; 3.2 g fat;1.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 23.6 g protein; 33.9 g carbohydrates; 276 mg sodium

  • What's My Alternative: Acupuncture for TMJ

    For more than a year, Nancy Moore, 60, of Bellingham, Washington, suffered from debilitating jaw pain. Constant jaw clenching and teeth grinding—a result of the stresses in Moore’s life—led her to develop temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ), a condition that occurs when the joint connecting the lower jaw to the skull becomes inflamed and limits jaw mobility.

    By Alyse Clacy
  • Supplement Watch: Mulberry Leaf Extract

    Mealtime—a relaxing, pleasurable activity for most of us—is a challenge for type-2 diabetics because they have to monitor every morsel in order to minimize their blood-sugar fluctuations.

    By Gina-Roberts Grey
  • The 2009 Get Healthy & Stay Healthy Guide

    We’ve all heard the same advice a million times, no matter what our health concerns: Eat better, exercise more, and stress less. But why is that so hard for many of us to do?

    While most nutritionists and doctors tell us to eat plenty of fruits, veggies, whole grains, and spices—they don’t really explain how we can do that in three meals a day.

    By Lindsay Wilson, Nicole Duncan, Erin Quinn, Kate Hanley
  • Natural Ways to Turn Down the Heat

    The holidays are always a good excuse to indulge in unhealthy foods—so it’s no surprise that a recent survey from The National Heartburn Alliance found that 37 percent of adults say they’re more likely to suffer from heartburn during this season than any other time of year.

    By Celia Shatzman
  • The Super Soaker

    Soaking brown rice overnight before cooking releases a compound called ASG (acylated steryl glucoside) that may help diabetics ward off disease-related nerve and vascular damage. New research in the Journal of Lipid Research shows that ASG helps normalize blood sugar by increasing levels of good enzymes that diabetes destroys.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • It's Easy Being Green

    Before you take that mid-afternoon java break, remember this: Feeling sluggish may be your body’s way of telling you your pH balance is off. Too much sugar, fat, and protein can make you overly acidic. When that happens, your body pulls calcium from your bones in an effort to correct the imbalance.

    By Nicole Sprinkle