Food & Recipes

  • Primer on Probiotics

    Probiotic, prebiotic; good bugs, bad bugs. Every time we turn around, another study champions the benefits of these gut-friendly supplements. But what are they? What do they do? Why should we take them? We asked Angelica S. Vrablic, PhD, a leading expert in nutrition research and a probiotic guru, to give us the lowdown. Here’s what we learned:

    By Nora Simmons
  • Supplement Watch: Thiamine

    Vitamin B1 (also known as thiamine) may reverse kidney damage, says a new study in the journal Diabetologia. High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels and prevent your kidneys from functioning properly—a problem many diabetics face.

  • Build A Better Salad

    Want to boost brain health or eat to beat cancer? Make yourself a salad. Beth Reardon, RD, LDN, at Duke Integrative Medicine, helps you customize your greens.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Worth Their Salt

    Few dishes would be complete without a sprinkle of salt. A shake or two can bring out the natural flavor of foods during cooking, and a flourish of coarsely ground salt adds a slightly crunchy flair to any meal.

    7 artisian varieties that add flavor and a health boost to a range of meals
    By Lisa Turner
  • Sleep Saboteurs

    If you’re among the estimated 65 percent of Americans who have trouble sleeping at least a few nights a week, you’re probably tired of hearing about all the possible culprits for your bedtime woes, from too much caffeine and late-night TV to not enough exercise or unwind time in the evenings.

    What to eat and what to avoid to put insomnia to rest.
    By Monica Bhide
  • Holy Basil, Batman.

    Long-heralded by ayurvedic medicine for its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, holy basil has recently passed scientific scrutiny. Indian researchers have now confirmed that the herb (also called tulsi) works as an adaptogen, sticking to and neutralizing free radicals that wear down the body.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • In Season: Rhubarb

    It got the nickname “pie plant” thanks to its mouthwatering pie pairing with strawberries, but rhubarb is actually a more versatile veggie than that. And there’s good reason to experiment with rhubarb beyond the pie plate: Studies show that rhubarb has anticancer properties and can even help lower blood pressure.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • In Season: Artichokes

    Once considered an aphrodisiac, artichokes literally feed the heart. In fact, in a study assessing the heart health–promoting antioxidant levels of more than a thousand different foods, artichoke hearts measured the highest of all vegetables, and ranked fourth overall. The reason? Artichokes contain silymarin, known to protect against skin cancer and promote healthy liver function.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Supplement Watch: Acetyl-L-carnitine

    Walk out of the grocery store and can’t find your car? Left your keys in the front door—again? Age-related forgetfulness can be maddening, so you’ll want to write this one down: acetyl-L-carnitine. Research shows this amino acid can boost brainpower and memory.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Ode to an Olive

    In the late spring, throughout the rocky terrain of the Mediterranean, the gnarled limbs of the Olea europaea tree begin to bud with olives. Too bitter to eat right off the tree, they’re first fermented and cured in oil, salt, or brine (a combination of salt and water or wine). The method and ingredients determine the olive’s final flavor, texture, and color.

    These little fruits are as nutritious as they are tasty.
    By Lisa Turner