Food & Recipes

  • Alternative Medicine Cabinet: Fight Food Poisoning

    From fine dining to take-out Thai, Americans eat out much more than they used to—an average of four times every week. Food poisoning is also on the rise—it’s second only to the common cold in how frequently it strikes. Some 76 million Americans suffer from it each year.

    Bounce back faster with these gentle cures.
    By Victoria Dolby Toews, MPH
  • Spice Up Your Health

    There’s good reason to season: Doctors and dietitians agree that your spice rack can be just as essential as your medicine cabinet when it comes to preventing and treating disease. Research consistently shows that many spices and herbs have medicinal qualities and can help prevent everything from cancer to the common cold.

    By Vicky Uhland
  • Spice for the Spirits

    Frankincense has infused houses of worship for centuries with its heavenly aroma, so it’s not all that surprising to learn new research has proven the scent can, indeed, raise your spirits.

    By Barbra Annino
  • Natural Pain Relief

    Pharmaceutical painkillers may provide temporary relief, but these natural alternatives can work just as well—minus the side effects.

    By Danielle Braff
  • Green and Gold Salad

    DRESSING
    3 tablespoons unfiltered honey, softened if hard
    2 teaspoons lemon zest (grated peel)
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
    1 tablespoon walnut oil
    Dash cinnamon, dash ground ginger
    Pinch ground nutmeg, pinch salt

    SALAD
    6 cups baby spinach
    1/4 red onion, thinly sliced into rounds
    1 orange or medium grapefruit
    1/4 cup chopped raw walnuts
    Pinch cinnamon (for garnish)

    1. Whisk the dressing ingredients in a small dish until emulsified.

    2. Arrange the spinach on a large platter and top with the red onion rounds.

    3. Remove the stem and opposite end of the orange with a sharp knife. Lay the orange flat side down, and slice the skin off in 1- or 2-inch sections from top to bottom, taking care not to remove too much of the fruit. Turn the orange so the flat ends face to the sides. Slice the orange into 1/4-inch rounds, and quarter each round.

    4. Arrange the oranges in a decorative fashion over the spinach and onions. Drizzle the salad generously with the dressing, and sprinkle with the chopped walnuts and cinnamon.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 162 calories; 9 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 3 g protein; 22 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 38 mg sodium

  • Pineapple-Date Ambrosia

    Serves 6 to 8

    1 cup Greek or regular plain, unsweetened yogurt
    4 to 6 tablespoons agave nectar (depending upon desired sweetness)
    4 cups diced fresh, ripe pineapple
    1 heaping cup chopped dates
    1 cup coconut flakes
    1/2 cup minced fresh mint leaves



     

    1. Mix the yogurt and agave together in a dish.

    2. Toss all remaining ingredients in a large bowl and gently blend in the yogurt. Let sit 10 minutes before serving to allow flavors to develop.

    Nutrition info per serving (based on 6 servings): 228.1 calories; 6.4 g fat; 4.9 g saturated fat; 5.3 mg cholesterol; 3.1 g protein; 44.3 g carbohydrates; 5.1 g fiber; 24.2 mg sodium

  • Now Pop This

    Looking for a late-night nosh that’s actually good for you? Try popcorn. According to researchers at the Center for Human Nutrition, people who eat popcorn have an approximately 250 percent higher daily intake of whole grains and a 22 percent higher daily intake of fiber than non-popcorn eaters.

  • Global Warming's Effect on Your Dinner Table

    New research published in the journal Global Change Biology says that increased levels of greenhouse gases could decrease the nutritional values of several foods—including barley, wheat, soybeans, potatoes, and rice.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • A Salad Fit For Your Skin

    Toss avocado, lettuce, and tomato with a splash of olive oil, and you have a healthy salad. Bottle them up with staples like aloe vera and sweet almond oil, and you have a recipe for serious beauty boosting.

    The nutrients that feed your body can also nourish your complexion.
    By Josie Garthwaite
  • Eat to Beat Inflammation

    Inflammation has become quite the buzzword lately, touted as the cause of everything from acne to Alzheimer’s and from digestive issues to obesity. And while new research continues to support that theory, it’s important to remember that inflammation can actually be a good thing.

    7 foods that can transform your health
    By Alison Anton