Food & Recipes

  • King of the Soups

    Chicken soup not only soothes your soul, it can lower your blood pressure, clear nasal clog, reduce inflammation—and even help you lose weight. (Is this a perfect food or what?) Research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry revealed that the collagen proteins in chicken produced a significant and prolonged decrease in blood pressure (at least in rats).

    By Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen
  • In Season: Belgian Endive

    This pleasantly bitter but slightly sweet member of the chicory family is at its peak from November to April. With only one calorie per leaf, this fat-, sodium-, and cholesterol-free vegetable provides an excellent source of folate and heart-healthy potassium.

    By Stacy Brugeman
  • Splenda Makes You Fat

    What you stir into your morning cup of java may be increasing your waistline and creating a digestive imbalance. A small study published in the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health suggests that consuming Splenda—even within the limits set by the FDA—decreases healthy intestinal flora and causes weight gain.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Grapefruit for Hepatitis C

    Cutting edge research suggests that naringenin—the metabolized form of the natural flavonoid naringin, which gives grapefruit its bitter taste—may curb the spread of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) by up to 80 percent.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Better Berries to Fight Cancer

    The next time you toss a handful of berries into your morning smoothie, reach for freeze-dried instead of fresh or frozen. Science now indicates that freeze-dried berries, specifically black raspberries, inhibit cancer development by restoring hundreds of cancer-altered genes to their normal state.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • I Heart Garlic

    This Valentine’s Day don’t let the prospect of smooch-repelling garlic breath keep you from protecting your heart. Garlic, specifically a compound called allicin, helps control high blood pressure (aka hypertension)—a dangerous condition that afflicts one in five Americans and increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • The Scary Truth About Statins

    The notion that high cholesterol causes heart disease has allowed doctors to write millions of prescriptions for cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins that can reduce the risk of it. That seemingly indisputable notion has long suffered from an inconvenient fact: Half the people who have a heart attack don’t have high cholesterol.

    What you need to know before you fill that prescription
    By Erin Quinn
  • Head Case

    When a headache strikes, you probably don’t care what kind you have; you just want it to go away—fast. But before you head for your medicine cabinet, try doing a little detective work first. Why? Because aspirin or anti-inflammatory drugs may not be the best cure.

    Knowing what type of headache you have will help you find relief once and for all.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Dance Your Way to Better Health

    When it comes to getting your groove on, you may consider yourself among the rhythm-challenged, with two left feet and a repertoire confined to wedding-induced displays of the funky chicken. The words fun and dance have never gone together in your mind. But lock the door, close the blinds, and give it a try with no one else around because dancing truly is an easy way to get into shape.

    From ballet to Bollywood, find your fitness groove.
    By Karen Asp
  • Say "C" to Stave Off Arthritis

    Eating vitamin C–rich foods may protect your knees from osteoarthritis, reports a recent study in Arthritis Research & Therapy. Here’s why: They’re packed with antioxidants, which protect cells from oxidative damage, and oxidative damage breaks down cartilage—the “shock absorber” in the knee joint.

    By Celia Shatzman