Food & Recipes

  • Sweet Potato, Carrot, and Onion Dip

    1 pound sweet potatoes, scrubbed
    1 medium carrot, peeled
    and thinly sliced
    1/2 medium onion, peeled and thinly sliced
    1 tablespoon tahini
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    1/2 teaspoon curry powder
    1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

    1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Wrap the sweet potatoes in foil, and roast for 50 minutes or until cooked through. Uncover, and let sit for 10 minutes. Remove the skin, and chop the potatoes into medium-size pieces.
    2. In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Add the carrot and onion, return to a boil, reduce the heat, simmer for 10 minutes. Do not drain; set aside.
    3. In a food processor, combine the sweet potato, the carrot-onion mixture with the cooking liquid, and the remaining ingredients. Puree until smooth. Refrigerate, covered, till ready to serve or for up to three days.

    nutrition info (per 1/4 cup): 63 calories; 0.9 g fat; 0.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 1.2 g protein; 12.9 g

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