Food & Recipes

  • The Beauty Bar: Coenzyme Q10

    Your body naturally produces a compound known as coenzyme Q10— aka Co-Q10, or ubiquinone. This antioxidant darling of the supplement world helps cells regenerate and protects them against damage that could lead to premature aging, heart disease, or even cancer.

  • Vegan in the Raw

    After decades of suffering from lactose intolerance and sensitivity to basically anything with taste, I decided to change my diet. But my fledgling gastronomic experience as a vegan did nothing to prepare me for my first raw-food meal. After all, it's not terribly hard to be a vegan—or just a vegetarian—the challenge lies in being a healthy one.

    One women's newfound love for living foods
    By Vicki Confrey
  • Magic Mushrooms

    Unlike the kind you heard about in college, the chemicals in these ’shrooms won’t give you special powers—or get you arrested for that matter—but they are creating quite a buzz. Developed in Japan in the mid 1980s, active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is produced from the fermented extract of a hybrid of several medicinal mushrooms.

    By Nora Simmons
  • 5 Ways to Save on Organic Food

    The price of food may be soaring, but buying conventional produce rather than organic may end up costing more in the long run. “Eating organic now could save you from expensive health problems down the line,” says John A. McDougall, MD, author of The McDougall Plan: 12 Days to Dynamic Health (Plume Publishing).

    By Bryce Edmonds
  • Focus On Food: Children's Nutrition

    Through his work as an associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, William Sears, MD, has found that as many as 50 percent of the kids who get diagnosed with ADD or ADHD also have poor nutrition. Sears believes they actually suffer from what he calls Nutrition Deficiency Disorder (NDD).

    By Nora Simmons
  • Ask The Doctor: Vericose Veins

    Varicose veins are caused by pressure from the blood in the veins, which is normally limited by valves every few inches in the vessels. With prolonged pressure from standing upright, hormonal changes, and weakening of the blood vessels, the valves break down, causing veins to grow larger and new vessels to form.

    Alan M. Dattner, MD
  • The Immune-Boosting Diet

    Everyone’s always sayingwhat an amazingly efficient immune system we have, but if that’s so true, why do we catch colds in the winter or suffer from allergies in the spring? The answer lies in ourselves. We don’t keep our immune system in fighting trim. Instead, we do all sorts of things that make it weak in the knees.

    9 foods to help you stay well all season long
    By Wendy McMillan
  • Back to Your Roots

    All spring and summer,while slender stalks of asparagus and tender, young greens make their flashy debut, the humble root vegetables lie calm and still in the warm earth, waiting patiently for autumn. As soon as the first leaves begin to turn and drop, these unassuming tubers are ready for their starring roles in the produce world.

    Rediscover what these colorful veggies can bring to the table.
    By Lisa Turner
  • Lung Cancer: Should You Worry?

    The first question most of us ask when someone gets lung cancer is: How much did she smoke? Unfortunately anyone can get the disease without ever lighting up. In fact, about 13 percent of those diagnosed with lung cancer are nonsmokers, according to the American Cancer Society.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Spinach and Crab No-Crust Quiche

    2 large eggs
    2 egg whites
    1 can (7 to 8 ounces) crab meat, drained
    1/2 cup skim milk
    1/2 cup flour
    10 ounces frozen chopped spinach, thawed, and drained
    3/4 cup reduced-fat, grated Swiss cheese
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1/4 cup reduced-fat, shredded cheddar cheese

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. In a bowl, whisk eggs and egg whites. Stir in all remaining ingredients, except for cheddar cheese.
    3. Pour egg mixture into prepared pie plate or quiche dish coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle top evenly with cheddar cheese.
    4. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes, or until set.

    Nutrition info per serving (6): 152.9 calories; 5.3 g fat; 2.8 g saturated fat; 94.3 mg cholesterol; 13.9 g protein; 12 g carbohydrates; 1.4 g fiber; 281 mg sodium