Food & Recipes

  • Sleep Saboteurs

    If you’re among the estimated 65 percent of Americans who have trouble sleeping at least a few nights a week, you’re probably tired of hearing about all the possible culprits for your bedtime woes, from too much caffeine and late-night TV to not enough exercise or unwind time in the evenings.

    What to eat and what to avoid to put insomnia to rest.
    By Monica Bhide
  • Delete This Additive

    Next time you crave a frozen pizza, scan the ingredients first for compounds known as inorganic phosphates (Pi). Common in packaged foods, these additives, which manufacturers use to retain water and improve texture, can harm your lungs, brain, liver, and teeth when eaten regularly—and may also cause or aggravate ADD/ADHD in your children.

    By Kyle Bradley
  • In Season: Rhubarb

    It got the nickname “pie plant” thanks to its mouthwatering pie pairing with strawberries, but rhubarb is actually a more versatile veggie than that. And there’s good reason to experiment with rhubarb beyond the pie plate: Studies show that rhubarb has anticancer properties and can even help lower blood pressure.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Primer on Probiotics

    Probiotic, prebiotic; good bugs, bad bugs. Every time we turn around, another study champions the benefits of these gut-friendly supplements. But what are they? What do they do? Why should we take them? We asked Angelica S. Vrablic, PhD, a leading expert in nutrition research and a probiotic guru, to give us the lowdown. Here’s what we learned:

    By Nora Simmons
  • Worth Their Salt

    Few dishes would be complete without a sprinkle of salt. A shake or two can bring out the natural flavor of foods during cooking, and a flourish of coarsely ground salt adds a slightly crunchy flair to any meal.

    Seven artisan varieties that add flavor and a health boost to a range of meals
    By Lisa Turner
  • Supplement Watch: Thiamine

    Vitamin B1 (also known as thiamine) may reverse kidney damage, says a new study in the journal Diabetologia. High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels and prevent your kidneys from functioning properly—a problem many diabetics face.

  • Bedtime Relax Tea

    2 cups water
    1/2 teaspoon dried or fresh chamomile
    1/2 teaspoon dried lavender
    1/2 teaspoon dried mint
    1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
    1/2 teaspoon dried lemon balm

    1. In a pot, bring the water to a boil. Remove from heat.
    2. Add the chamomile, lavender, mint, fennel, and lemon balm. Steep for 5 to 10 minutes.
    3. Strain and drink before going to bed.

    nutrition info per serving: 2 calories; 0 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 0 g protein; 0 g carbohydrates; 0 g fiber; 2 mg sodium

  • Riso Di Basilico

    2 cups loosely packed fresh basil leaves
    2 tablespoons pine nuts
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    2 tablespoons mellow white miso paste
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    6 cups cooked brown rice

    1. Put the basil, pine nuts, garlic, and miso paste into a food processor, and blend.
    2. Slowly add the oil in a fine stream until the paste is smooth and creamy. Scrape the sides of the processor to make sure that the mixture is completely blended. Set aside.
    3. Place the rice in a large bowl. Pour the basil mixture onto the rice, and mix well.
    4. Serve cold as a salad or hot as a side dish.

    nutrition info per serving: 239.5 calories; 16.2 g fat; 2.2 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 2.3 g protein; 21.3 g carbohydrates; 1.6 g fiber; 158.7 mg sodium

  • Dill Tofu Dip

    12-ounce block soft tofu, drained and patted dry
    1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
    3 tablespoons finely minced yellow onion
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
    2 tablespoons mellow white miso
    2 tablespoons water
    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    Freshly ground black pepper to taste

    1. Place all the ingredients into a blender, and blend well.
    2. Refrigerate for 2 hours, and serve with carrot and celery sticks, as well as colorful bell peppers and radishes.

    nutrition info per serving: 47 calories; 2.1 g fat; .3 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 3.9 g protein; 3.7 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 227.9 mg sodium

  • Butternut Squash Soup

    3 tablespoons olive oil
    2 cups chopped celery
    2 cups chopped leeks (white parts)
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    2 cups chopped parsley
    2 cups chopped carrots
    2 medium potatoes with skin, diced
    1 medium parsnip, diced
    4 cups butternut squash, peeled and diced
    6 small zucchini, sliced
    4 cups free-range chicken broth
    6 cups water
    Sea salt and pepper to taste

    1. Add olive oil to a soup pot over medium.
    2. Add the celery, leeks, and garlic, and sauté for about 5 to 7 minutes or until the leeks become translucent. Add the chopped parsley.
    3. Add carrots, potatoes, parsnip, and squash; cook for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring constantly.
    4. Add in the sliced zucchini and continue to cook for another 5 minutes.
    5. Add broth and water. Bring to a boil.
    6. Reduce heat, and simmer for 45 minutes.

    nutrition info per serving: 124 calories; 4 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 4 g protein; 21 g carbohydrates; 6.2 g fiber; 66 mg sodium