Food & Recipes

  • Vegetarian Mixed-Bean Chili Express

    6 cloves garlic, minced or crushed
    1 tablespoon chili powder (preferably a dark variety, such as ancho)
    1 tablespoon dried oregano
    1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
    1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    1 can (28 ounces) low-sodium diced tomatoes
    1 1/2 cups cooked or 1 can (15 ounces) pinto beans, rinsed and drained
    1 1/2 cups cooked or 1 can (15 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained
    1 1/2 cups cooked or 1 can (15 ounces) small red or red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
    3 cups hot water
    1 1/2 cups dry textured vegetable protein
    1 cup frozen whole-kernel corn
    1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
    1 tablespoon hot-pepper sauce
    1 tablespoon onion powder
    1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
    1 teaspoon sugar
    2 tablespoons cornmeal or masa harina
    Salt to taste

    Steam-fry the garlic in a large, heavy nonstick skillet for 2 minutes. Add the chili powder, oregano, cumin, and red pepper and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the tomatoes (with juice), beans, hot water, vegetable protein, corn bell pepper, soy sauce, hot-pepper sauce, onion powder, cocoa, and sugar. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 15 to 30 minutes. During the last 5 minutes of cooking sprinkle the cornmeal or masa harina over the top and stir thoroughly. Season with the salt.


    Per serving (6): 329 calories, 26 g protein, 57 g carbohydrates, 7 g sugar, 2 g total fat, 4% calories from fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 16 g fiber, 457 mg sodium  

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