Food & Recipes

  • Bedtime Relax Tea

    2 cups water
    1/2 teaspoon dried or fresh chamomile
    1/2 teaspoon dried lavender
    1/2 teaspoon dried mint
    1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
    1/2 teaspoon dried lemon balm

    1. In a pot, bring the water to a boil. Remove from heat.
    2. Add the chamomile, lavender, mint, fennel, and lemon balm. Steep for 5 to 10 minutes.
    3. Strain and drink before going to bed.

    nutrition info per serving: 2 calories; 0 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 0 g protein; 0 g carbohydrates; 0 g fiber; 2 mg sodium

  • Worth Their Salt

    Few dishes would be complete without a sprinkle of salt. A shake or two can bring out the natural flavor of foods during cooking, and a flourish of coarsely ground salt adds a slightly crunchy flair to any meal.

    Seven artisan varieties that add flavor and a health boost to a range of meals
    By Lisa Turner
  • King of the Soups

    Chicken soup not only soothes your soul, it can lower your blood pressure, clear nasal clog, reduce inflammation—and even help you lose weight. (Is this a perfect food or what?) Research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry revealed that the collagen proteins in chicken produced a significant and prolonged decrease in blood pressure (at least in rats).

    By Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen
  • In Season: Artichokes

    Once considered an aphrodisiac, artichokes literally feed the heart. In fact, in a study assessing the heart health–promoting antioxidant levels of more than a thousand different foods, artichoke hearts measured the highest of all vegetables, and ranked fourth overall. The reason? Artichokes contain silymarin, known to protect against skin cancer and promote healthy liver function.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Go Bananas

    An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but if you want to avoid the cardiologist, reach for a banana. Research presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s 41st Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition in November linked low dietary potassium with high blood pressure in an analysis of more than 3,300 people.

    By Beth Bence Reinke
  • Gluten-Free Made Easy

    Among all the health food buzzwords out there, gluten-free really stands out, backed by a noticeable increase in everything from gluten-free restaurant menus to gluten-free foods and cookbooks. While some people ditch gluten-containing foods to help them lose weight, many others make the switch because health reasons force them to.

    Why eliminating gluten-filled grains from your diet can transform your health.
    By Erinn Morgan / Recipes by Wendy McMillan
  • Supplement Watch: Acetyl-L-carnitine

    Walk out of the grocery store and can’t find your car? Left your keys in the front door—again? Age-related forgetfulness can be maddening, so you’ll want to write this one down: acetyl-L-carnitine. Research shows this amino acid can boost brainpower and memory.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Ode to an Olive

    In the late spring, throughout the rocky terrain of the Mediterranean, the gnarled limbs of the Olea europaea tree begin to bud with olives. Too bitter to eat right off the tree, they’re first fermented and cured in oil, salt, or brine (a combination of salt and water or wine). The method and ingredients determine the olive’s final flavor, texture, and color.

    These little fruits are as nutritious as they are tasty.
    By Lisa Turner
  • Lentil and Red Bean Loaf

    1 teaspoon olive oil
    1 medium onion, chopped
    1 14 oz can lentils
    1 14 oz can red kidney beans
    2 eggs
    1 carrot, finely grated
    1/2 cup grated zucchini
    1/4 cup low-sodium tomato paste
    1 cup cooked white rice
    1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
    1/2 teaspoon ground pepper; 1 teaspoon oregano
    1 cup reduced-fat cheddar cheese, grated

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan.
    2. Heat olive oil in a frying pan, add onion, and cook until translucent, 3 to 5 minutes.
    3. Rinse and drain lentils and beans. Process with onion and egg until smooth.
    4. Transfer lentil mixture to a bowl, and stir in remaining ingredients.
    5. Pour into loaf pan and bake 1 hour.

    nutrition info per serving (6): 273 calories; 10 g fat; 5 g saturated fat; 91 mg cholesterol; 22 g protein; 34 g carbohydrates; 9 g fiber; 316 mg sodium

  • Pesto Tofu Rice Noodles

    1 14 oz package firm tofu, rinsed and drained
    2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    1 cup packed fresh spinach leaves
    1/4 cup chopped walnuts
    2 garlic cloves
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
    2 tablespoons reduced-fat Parmesan cheese
    1 9 oz package wide, flat rice noodles

    1. Pat tofu block dry, cut into bite-sized pieces, and arrange on a greased baking pan. Broil 10 minutes each side.
    2. Combine next 7 ingredients in a food processor, pulsing to desired pesto texture.
    3. In a medium saucepan, prepare noodles according to package directions; drain, but leave noodles and a little liquid in the pan. Add tofu and pesto to noodles and serve.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 325 calories; 21 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 2 mg cholesterol; 18 g protein; 21 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 69 mg sodium