Food & Recipes

  • Think Outside the Bag

    Talk about a serendipitous event: Legend has it that chance brewed the first tea when Camellia sinensis leaves blew into a pot of boiling water. It was 2737 BC, and the accidental teameister who boiled that water, Chinese Emperor Shen Nung, concluded the new brew gave “vigor of body, contentment of mind, and determination of purpose.”

    Get all the benefits of tea without curing up with a cup.
    By Bryce Edmonds
  • What a Catch

    Lobster and tuna and barramundi—oh my! Standing in front of the fish counter isn’t as easy as it used to be. Tuna or tilapia, salmon or sardines, farmed or wild, fresh or frozen—the choices are enough to make my head swim … I mean spin. Plus, I’m nursing a newborn, and it just seems easier to skip seafood altogether instead of making the wrong choice.

    How to choose the most sustainable seafood
    By Allison Young / Recipes by Rebecca Caro
  • Achoo Alert

    Do fresh-picked peaches make you sneeze? Does chomping on celery tickle your tongue? Studies show that if you’re allergic to seasonal pollens, your immune system may mistake the proteins of certain raw fruits and veggies for those in pollen—causing you to wheeze, itch, or swell.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • In Season: Papaya

    Dubbed “fruit of the angels” by Christopher Columbus, meltingly sweet papaya offers a splash of exotic flair to sweet and savory dishes. Available year round but best in summer and fall, one papaya has more than three times the daily value of powerhouse antioxidant vitamin C, which helps boost immunity and heart health.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Combat Your Food Cravings

    Finish a meal and go straight for the cookie jar? Have to drink a soda with dinner? Arizona-based naturopath Colleen Huber says all food cravings are really your body trying to tell you it needs more of certain minerals. Here are clues to what your food cravings could be trying to tell you—and how to satisfy them the healthy way.
     

  • So Long, Sugar!

    Ousting the sweet stuff from your diet can temper a litany of health complaints, from high cholesterol to digestive woes. But don’t go cold turkey—that can lead to lethargy, headaches, and mood swings—especially if you have a serious sweet tooth. To help you go sugar free without the side effects:

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • The Clear Skin Diet

    Jodi Frestedt breezed through her teenage years without so much as a pimple. While most of her peers suffered their share of embarrassing breakouts, Frestedt never gave her skin a second thought as she posed for school pictures and primped for prom. But at age 26, her face erupted in a slew of blemishes, leaving her baffled and suddenly self-conscious.

    Five foods to eat, and four to avoid, for a glowing complexion.
    By Melaina Juntti
  • In Season: Fava Beans

    This eastern Mediterranean member of the pea family makes its debut in late spring. Favas pack a huge protein punch, boast ample amounts of fiber and iron, and contain L-dopa, an amino acid that produces dopamine, which triggers a feel-good response in the brain. Look for firm, vibrant green pods for the best flavor.

    By Caroline Mosey
  • Toxin Alert: Not-So-Sweet Treats

    Turns out high-fructose corn syrup can mess with more than just your waistline. A recent study published in the journal Environmental Health found this widely used sweetener often contains traces of mercury, a toxic metal that interferes with the brain and nervous system and causes a host of health problems, particularly for children and pregnant women.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Got (Non-Dairy) Milk?

    As the mustached celebrities in those milk ads tell us, milk does a body good thanks to its calcium, vitamin D, and other nutrients. But what if you’re lactose intolerant, vegan, or simply not a fan of cow’s milk? You have plenty of nondairy options—from the more common ones like soy and rice milks to the nut, oat, and even hemp varieties.

    By Erin Quinn