Food & Recipes

  • Does Your Diet Need A Makeover?


    Shopping List

    Whether you want to drop a few pounds, lower your risk of heart disease, or decrease pain and inflammation in your body, certain foods can help you reach these goals. Here are the ones to add to your shopping list.
    Nicole Egenberger, ND
  • Make Love Last

    It’s hard to believe that after those lofty vows of marriage, a relationship could break up because of something as mundane as dishes left in the sink or the protocols of reading in bed. Yet even the most evolved relationships get snagged in the pettiest of disputes.

  • Tangy Papaya Sauce

    Serve over grilled shrimp, fish, or chicken.

    1 cup papaya, peeled and diced
    1/4 cup fresh lime juice
    1/4 cup honey
    1/2 cup water
    1 tablespoon red onion, diced
    Dash of chili powder

    In a blender or food processor, combine papaya, lime juice, honey, and water. Process until smooth, then stir finely diced red onion and a dash of chili powder.

  • Seared Scallops With Udon Noodles

    For the scallops
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 tablespoons panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    8 to 16 scallops (2 to 4 per person)
    1 tablespoon olive oil

    For the noodles
    1 package udon noodles
    2 tablespoons sesame oil
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 scallions, thinly sliced
    1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger
    1/4 cup tamari or shoyu (soy sauce)
    Black sesame seeds and fresh cilantro for garnish (optional)

    For the scallops
    1. Combine the first three ingredients in a large Ziploc bag, and shake thoroughly.
    2. Add scallops, seal the bag, and shake to coat.
    3. Heat oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add scallops, cook 3 minutes on each side, or until done. Remove from heat.

    For the noodles
    1. Cook udon noodles according to package directions; drain.
    2. To prepare dressing, combine sesame oil, garlic, scallions, ginger, and shoyu sauce; mix well.
    3. Place noodles in a medium-sized glass or non-reactive stainless dish; add dressing and mix well to coat noodles.
    4. Serve noodles hot or cold with 2 to 4 scallops on top, and garnish with sesame seeds and cilantro.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 378.7 calories; 8.4 g fat; 1.6 g saturated fat; 9.9 mg cholesterol; 14.3 g protein; 60.1 g carbohydrates; 0.8 g fiber; 797.8 mg sodium

  • Blackened Striped Bass With Braised Greens

    1 pound striped bass
    4 whole cloves garlic, skin removed
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    2 teaspoons paprika
    2 teaspoons dried thyme
    2 teaspoons dried oregano
    2 teaspoons black pepper
    3 to 4 tablespoons olive oil
    1 to 2 large bunch(es) of spinach greens

    1. Rinse the fish and cut into portions. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add 2 garlic cloves, browning on all sides until the oil is infused with the garlic flavor. Remove garlic and discard.

    2. Combine salt, cayenne, paprika, thyme, oregano, and pepper on a plate, and coat the fish on both sides. Place fish in the skillet and sear over medium-high heat for 4 to 5 minutes on each side, or until fish is white and flakes when prodded with a fork. Set aside.

    3. Heat the remaining oil over medium heat. Add the remaining garlic to the skillet and brown slightly. Add the greens and cover; cook until the greens have reduced by half, about 7 to 10 minutes. They should retain their color but be soft and edible.

    4. Serve fish over greens.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 285 calories; 14.6 g fat; 2.3 g saturated fat; 116.7 mg cholesterol; 31.3 g protein; 9.6 g carbohydrates; 5.2 g fiber; 817.4 mg sodium

  • Wild Smoked Salmon Dip

    2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    8 ounces light, organic cream cheese
    6 ounces wild Pacific smoked salmon

    Combine first three ingredients in a food processor; add 3 ounces of the salmon and process until smooth. Fold in remaining salmon and serve with whole grain crackers.

    nutrition info per serving (12): 58.1 calories; 3.2 g fat; 1.9 g saturated fat; 16.3 mg cholesterol; 5.3 g protein; 1.7 g carbohydrates; 0 g fiber; 170 mg sodium

  • Light Shrimp Salad

    1 pound cooked shrimp, deveined, shells and tails removed
    1/2 cup lime juice, preferably fresh-squeezed
    1/2 cup lemon juice, preferably fresh-squeezed
    3/4 cup white onion, diced
    1 jalapeño pepper, stemmed, seeded, and diced
    1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro
    1 tomato, seeded and diced
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    Salt, to taste

    1. Chop shrimp into chunks and combine with the next three ingredients in a medium-sized bowl; let sit, refrigerated, for 1 to 4 hours. Since the shrimp is already cooked, this allows the flavors to meld, rather than letting the citrus juice actually cook the fish, like in a ceviche.
    2. Just before serving, stir in the remaining ingredients. Serve with tortilla chips.

    nutrition info per serving (6): 119.1 calories; 3.2 g fat; 0.5 g saturated fat; 147.3 mg cholesterol; 16.5 g protein; 6.6 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 172.4 mg sodium

  • The Beauty of Wine

    You cheered when news broke that a glass of red wine a day is actually good for your heart. Turns out it’s not just imbibing the stuff (in moderation, of course) that may have health benefits.

    Reasons to toast vino's rejuvenating powers.
    by O'Rya Hyde-Keller
  • Better 'Wich Craft

    You already know to steer clear of deli meats, which are loaded with sodium, saturated fat, and cancer-causing nitrates. But just because a ham-and-havarti isn’t the healthiest choice doesn’t mean you have to forsake sandwiches altogether. Here’s how to build a better sandwich, based on what you need:

    For post-workout power …

    By Allison Young
  • The Calcium Myth

    We’ve been told all our lives to drink milk for strong bones. Many of us even feel guilty when we don’t get the recommended three servings of dairy each day. In fact, we’ve been led to believe that we have a “calcium crisis” in the United States because so many of us don’t get enough dairy. The proposed solution?

    The nation’s leading health experts insist that we drink plenty of milk and take calcium supplements to protect our bones. What if they’re wrong?
    By Michael Castleman