Food & Recipes

  • Meet the Fakers

    Summer grilling season may be in full swing, but before you throw another burger or dog on the grill, now read this: According to the American Institute for Cancer Research’s Guidelines for Cancer Prevention, once you tip over the recommended max of 18 ounces of lean red meat per week, each additional 1.5 ounces increases your cancer risk by 15 percent.

    By Bryce Edmonds
  • Beauty From Within

    Mom was right: When it comes to beauty, what’s on the inside is just as important as what’s on the outside. New research shows that certain foods and beverages can literally improve your skin from within. Here’s how you can slather, supplement, and snack your way to glowing, youthful skin with the help of four hot, new beauty ingredients.

    Four superfoods that feed your skin
    By Vicky Uhland
  • In Season: Butternut Squash

    This hearty gourd has a whole lot of life beyond the Thanksgiving dinner table. Packed with plenty of powerful nutrients, butternut squash offers fiber, potassium for strong bones, and vitamin B6, which boosts the nervous and immune systems. Its bright, tangerine hue reflects its most powerful health benefit: carotenoids, which protect against heart disease.

    By Pamela Brill
  • Eat Right to Protect Eyesight

    The world is a beautiful place to behold. But for 15 million Americans, it can be a dim sight due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a disease that impairs central eyesight in older people. Fortunately, a new study from Tufts University finds that eating foods low on the glycemic index (GI) and rich in nutrients that promote eye health can drastically reduce risk of AMD.

    By Sarah Toland
  • Back in Focus

    To Susan Williams of Charlotte, North Carolina, it was like a speed bump she couldn’t get past. That’s how she described the wall she would hit when work deadlines loomed and her focus pinballed from one subject to the next. “Sometimes I was so easily distracted, the simplest task seemed daunting,” says Williams, 60.

    19 ways to manage ADHD without drugs
    By Matthew Solan
  • Wheatberry Pancakes

    1 cup wheat berries (whole wheat kernels)
    1 tablespoon whole flaxseed
    2 cups water
    1/3 cup chickpea flour (besan) or low-fat soy flour
    1 tablespoon sugar
    2 teaspoons lemon juice
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt

    Place the wheat berries, flaxseed, and water in a blender and process at high speed for about 2 minutes. Add the flour and process for 2 to 3 minutes or until very smooth. Add the sugar, lemon juice, baking powder, baking soda, and salt and process until well mixed.

    Heat a heavy nonstick griddle or skillet (a nonstick electric griddle cooks very evenly) over high heat until drops of water dance on the surface and then quickly disappear. Reduce the heat to medium-high. Working in batches if necessary, pour dollops of batter quickly onto the griddle, leaving space to expand. When bubbles appear on the surface, gently flip the pancakes. Don’t overcook; they should be a bit puffy when you take them off the griddle, so they are light and cakey.

    MAKES TWELVE 4” PANCAKES (3 SERVINGS)

    Per serving: 261 calories, 11 g protein, 53 g carbohydrates, 6 g sugar, 3 g total fat, 9% calories from fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 9 g fiber, 534 mg sodium

  • Fight Ulcers With Arugula

    You may find the latest remedy for painful peptic ulcers not at your local drugstore, but in your salad instead. Researchers recently discovered that Eruca sativa, an herb also known as rocket or arugula, helps reduce stomach-acid secretion that can irritate gastric ulcers, the type of peptic ulcers that form in the abdominal wall and can cause severe pain.

    By Sarah Toland
  • Frankincense Oil

    Looks like those wise men were on to something. Frankincense oil, long-heralded for its therapeutic benefits, may be an effective alternative therapy for bladder cancer, the fourth most common type of cancer among American men.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • Bottle of Youth

    Mom and Dad told you to take your vitamins. Hopefully, you listened because new research shows that popping multivitamins may actually make your cells younger. In an American Journal of Clinical Nutrition study involving 586 women, the cells of those who took multivitamins had a younger biological age than those of nonusers.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • Alternative Medicine Cabinet: Get Off the 'Rhoids

    Actually a type of varicose vein, hemorrhoids develop when veins in the lower rectum or anus become inflamed and swollen from trauma or too much internal pressure. We most often hear about them in relation to constipation and pregnancy, but they also result from anal intercourse, high blood pressure, venous blockages, or simply as an unpleasant side effect of aging.

    Soothing cures for hemorrhoids
    By Hilary Oliver