Food & Recipes

  • Better Berries to Fight Cancer

    The next time you toss a handful of berries into your morning smoothie, reach for freeze-dried instead of fresh or frozen. Science now indicates that freeze-dried berries, specifically black raspberries, inhibit cancer development by restoring hundreds of cancer-altered genes to their normal state.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • The Healthy Heart Diet

    When Mary Anne Nally of Southold, New York, went for her annual physical, she feared what her doctor might say when he saw her blood-test results. “High cholesterol runs in my family, and even though I eat a relatively healthy diet, I had a sneaking suspicion mine was high too,” says the 54-year-old.

    By Lambeth Hochwald / Recipes by Maria Cooper
  • Head Case

    When a headache strikes, you probably don’t care what kind you have; you just want it to go away—fast. But before you head for your medicine cabinet, try doing a little detective work first. Why? Because aspirin or anti-inflammatory drugs may not be the best cure.

    Knowing what type of headache you have will help you find relief once and for all.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Dance Your Way to Better Health

    When it comes to getting your groove on, you may consider yourself among the rhythm-challenged, with two left feet and a repertoire confined to wedding-induced displays of the funky chicken. The words fun and dance have never gone together in your mind. But lock the door, close the blinds, and give it a try with no one else around because dancing truly is an easy way to get into shape.

    From ballet to Bollywood, find your fitness groove.
    By Karen Asp
  • Fishy Findings

    If you favor fish in your diet for its health-boosting omega-3s, you need to take a hard look at where your fillets come from before you choose them.

    By Erinn Morgan
  • No-Cook Massaged Kale

    1 bunch of kale, finely chopped
    2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2 tablespoons lemon juice, fresh
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    Tomato, avacado, chili powder (optional)

    In a large bowl, combine kale, extra-virgin olive oil, lemon juice, and sea salt. Using your hands, massage all the ingredients together—tenderizing the greens without having to cook them. Add tomato, avocado, and chili powder for a Mexican flair.

  • Steamed Sesame Kale

    1 large leek, sliced into 1/4-inch rounds
    1 head of kale, chopped into small pieces
    1 to 2 tablespoons extra-vigin olive oil
    2 tablespoons seasame seeds, toasted
    Tamari or soy sauce
    2 teaspoons ume plum vinegar or lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    1. In a large steamer, place  leek. Steam until translucent, mixing occasionally; then add one head of chopped kale. Steam just long enough so that kale is tender, but not soggy.

    2. Remove, and toss in bowl with extra-virgin olive oil, toasted sesame seeds, a few splashes of tamari or soy sauce, and ume plum vinegar or lemon juice. Salt to taste.

  • Greek-Style Kale Salad

    3/4 pound kale leaves
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup lemon juice
    1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    Salt and pepper
    1/2 cup grape tomatoes
    1/3 cup kalamata olives, pitted
    2 ounches crumbled feta

    1. In a large pot of boiling water, blanch kale leaves until just tender, about 1 minute. Drain, and rinse under cold water to cool.

    2. Transfer kale to a clean kitchen towel, and press dry. Fluff up the leaves, coarsely chop, and transfer to a large bowl.

    3. In another bowl, combine olive oil with 1lemon juice,  crushed red pepper, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add grape tomatoes, kalamata olives, and crumbled feta to the kale.

    4. Add the dressing, and toss to coat. Great by itself, or chop finely and use as a stuffing for roasted red bell peppers.

  • Quinoa Vegetable Soup

    3/4 cup quinoa
    1 tablespoon canola oil
    2 onions, finely diced
    3 carrots, peeled and finely diced
    3 stalks celery, finely diced
    2 zucchini, finely diced
    1/2 cup yellow corn kernels
    1 red bell pepper, finely diced
    1 tablespoon minced garlic
    2 teaspoons sea salt
    12 cups low-sodium vegetable stock
    1 28-ounce can whole, peeled tomatoes
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    1/3 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
    Freshly ground black pepper

    1. Rinse quinoa well, and drain. Heat large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Add quinoa, and stir constantly for 10 minutes, or until the moisture evaporates and the quinoa crackles and becomes golden. Transfer quinoa to a bowl, and set aside.
    2. Heat oil in large, heavy stockpot over medium-high heat. Add onions, carrots, and celery. Sauté for 12 minutes. Add zucchini, corn, red pepper, garlic, and salt. Sauté 3 minutes longer, or until vegetables begin to release their juices.
    3. Add stock, cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in the toasted quinoa, and simmer over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes or until quinoa is almost tender.
    4. Squeeze the tomatoes into the soup, and add the juices from the can; then stir in the cumin and coriander. Simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until quinoa is tender.
    5. Stir in the cilantro, and season to taste with pepper and more salt, if desired.

    nutrition info per serving (10-12): 156 calories; 4 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 23 g carbohydrates; 152 mg sodium

  • Egg-cellent News for Dieters

    Before you start yet another diet du jour, consider this: Eating two eggs a day for breakfast helps you lose 65 percent more weight and gain more energy than a bagel of equal calories, says a recent study from the International Journal of Obesity.

    By Nicole Sprinkle