Food & Recipes

  • Heart Matters

    If you’re thinking, “Why should I worry about heart health?” here’s a reality check: A third of Americans already have some form of the condition. Even if you don’t have a family history of cardiovascular problems, you should take steps to protect your ticker. Why? Because your heart rules the health of every other system in your body.

    Heart disease is still the No. 1 killer of women. Try these 19 simple ways to lower your risk today.
    By Kate Hanley
  • In Season: Acorn Squash

    Luminous golden-orange flesh, nutty flavor, and manageable size make acorn squash a perennial winter favorite. Actually a fruit thanks to its seeds, this gourd delivers magnesium, vitamins C and B6, and blood pressure–lowering potassium with few calories. And you can’t beat acorn’s levels of beta-carotene, an antioxidant the body converts to immunity-boosting vitamin A.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Spot of Tea for Stress

    When the going gets tough, the tough get brewing, a notion legions of tea-loving Brits have subscribed to for centuries. Now, a City University of London study shows that putting a kettle on the stove and sipping tea in times of crisis or unrest can reduce stress—and even make you feel calmer than before the trauma.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • Seared Scallops with Udon Noodles

    Serves 4

    For the scallops

    2 tablespoons flour
    2 tablespoons panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    8 to 16 scallops (2 to 4 per person)
    1 tablespoon olive oil

    For the noodles
    1 package udon noodles
    2 tablespoons sesame oil
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 scallions, thinly sliced
    1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
    1/4 cup tamari or shoyu (soy sauce)
    Black sesame seeds and fresh cilantro for garnish (optional)

    For the scallops

    1. Combine the first three ingredients in a large Ziploc bag, and shake thoroughly. 
    2. Add scallops, seal the bag, and shake to coat. 
    3. Heat oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add scallops, cook 3 minutes on each side, or until done. Remove from heat.

    For the noodles
    1. Cook udon noodles according to package directions; drain.
    2. To prepare dressing, combine sesame oil, garlic, scallions, ginger, and shoyu sauce; mix well.
    3. Place noodles in a medium-sized glass or non-reactive stainless dish; add dressing and mix well to coat noodles. 
    4. Serve noodles hot or cold with 2 to 4 scallops on top, and garnish with sesame seeds and cilantro.

    nutrition info per serving: 378.7 calories; 8.4 g fat; 1.6 g saturated fat; 9.9 mg cholesterol; 14.3 g protein; 60.1 g carbohydrates; 0.8 g fiber; 797.8 mg sodium

  • Dal with Winter Vegetables

    3 tablespoons ghee (clarified butter) or vegetable oil
    1 cup chopped carrots
    1 cup peeled and cubed
    butternut squash
    4 cups water
    1 tablespoon freshly
    grated ginger
    2 teaspoons turmeric
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    1 teaspoon iodized salt (must be iodized on a sattvic diet)
    1 1/2 cups dried yellow lentils
    2 cups broccoli florets
    1 teaspoon brown
    mustard seed
    2 teaspoons cumin seed
    1 teaspoon fennel seed

    1. Add 2 tablespoons ghee (or oil), carrots, and squash to a large saucepan. Sauté for 8 minutes.
    2. Add water, ginger, turmeric, coriander, salt, and lentils. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for one hour.
    3. Add chopped broccoli and an additional cup of water (omit the water if you prefer a thick dal), and simmer for 10 minutes.
    4. While broccoli is cooking, toast brown mustard, cumin, and fennel in a skillet over high heat for 1 minute, or until spices become fragrant.
    5. Add remaining ghee or oil to the skillet, and sauté 1 minute. Combine with the broccoli and lentil mixture, and serve with basmati rice.

    nutrition info per serving: 158 calories; 7.8 g fat; 1.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 6.2 g protein; 18.6 g carbohydrates; 7.1 g fiber; 417 mg sodium

  • Fruit Fighters

    The term “superfruits” might make you think of cape-clad produce ready to leap to your nutritional rescue. In fact, many marketers want you to believe that mysterious fruits like mangosteens and goji berries have magical health-boosting properties.

    Fend off disease with these natural - and delicious - healers.
    By Molly Lyons
  • Sweet Potato and Apple Casserole

    2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
    1 1/2 cups fresh apple juice
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1/2 teaspoon each cinnamon, nutmeg, ground ginger
    (or ¼ teaspoon freshly grated ginger)
    4 apples, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
    1/3 cup raisins

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease a 13-by-9-inch baking pan, and add sweet potatoes.
    2. In a small bowl, combine apple juice, vanilla, and spices. Pour mixture over sweet potatoes, cover, and bake for 50 minutes.
    3. Add apples and raisins; cover, and bake for 30 minutes or until tender. Uncover, and bake for 5 minutes to brown the top. Serve warm.

    nutrition info per serving (8): 124 calories; 0 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 31 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 22 mg sodium

  • Spiced Pears

    6 large pears
    1 1/2 cups unsweetened pear juice or nectar
    1/4 cup raw honey
    1/2 teaspoon each ground ginger, cardamom, cloves
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    3 tablespoons ghee
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1/4 cup slivered almonds

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees, and butter an 11-by-18-inch baking dish.
    2. Cut each pear lengthwise into quarters, remove the core, and place skin side up in baking dish.
    3. In a separate bowl, mix juice, honey, and spices. Pour mixture over pears, and dot with ghee. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes.
    4. Remove foil, and bake for 5 to 10 minutes until pears are soft. Transfer pears to serving platter, and pour reserved liquid into a saucepan.
    5. Add vanilla, and heat mixture over high heat until syrupy, about 10 minutes.
    6. While syrup is reducing, toast almonds.
    7. Pour syrup over pears, and top with almonds.

    nutrition info per serving: 262 calories; 5 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 4 mg cholesterol; 2 g protein; 57 g carbohydrates; 8 g fiber; 7 mg sodium

  • Chai

    3 cups water
    1 tablespoon cardamom pods and seeds (about 15)
    1 teaspoon whole cloves
    1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
    2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced (or more to taste)
    2 cinnamon sticks
    1/4 teaspoon fennel seed
    4 teaspoons Assam black
    tea leaves
    1 1/2 cups milk
    Raw honey

    1. In a saucepan, bring water and spices to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 15 minutes.
    2. Remove from heat, add tea, and steep for 8 minutes.
    3. Strain the tea, discarding the leaves and spices, and return tea to the saucepan. Add milk and heat through. Serve with raw honey to taste.
    Note: If you’re caffeine-sensitive, opt for decaf rooibos tea leaves, or omit the tea altogether and have spiced milk.
    nutrition info per serving (using 2% milk)

    50 calories; 1.9 g fat; 1.2 g saturated fat; 7.3 mg cholesterol; 3.1 g protein; 5.3 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 37.8 mg sodium

  • Spice Up the Season

    Feel guilty sipping eggnog or munching on gingersnaps? These holiday goodies may not be as bad as you think. Some of the most commonly used spices in traditional treats can reduce inflammation, lower your risk of heart disease, and more, says Sarah Krieger, RD, national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

    By Celia Shatzman