Food & Recipes

  • In Season: Papaya

    Dubbed “fruit of the angels” by Christopher Columbus, meltingly sweet papaya offers a splash of exotic flair to sweet and savory dishes. Available year round but best in summer and fall, one papaya has more than three times the daily value of powerhouse antioxidant vitamin C, which helps boost immunity and heart health.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Blackened Striped Bass With Braised Greens

    1 pound striped bass
    4 whole cloves garlic, skin removed
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    2 teaspoons paprika
    2 teaspoons dried thyme
    2 teaspoons dried oregano
    2 teaspoons black pepper
    3 to 4 tablespoons olive oil
    1 to 2 large bunch(es) of spinach greens

    1. Rinse the fish and cut into portions. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add 2 garlic cloves, browning on all sides until the oil is infused with the garlic flavor. Remove garlic and discard.

    2. Combine salt, cayenne, paprika, thyme, oregano, and pepper on a plate, and coat the fish on both sides. Place fish in the skillet and sear over medium-high heat for 4 to 5 minutes on each side, or until fish is white and flakes when prodded with a fork. Set aside.

    3. Heat the remaining oil over medium heat. Add the remaining garlic to the skillet and brown slightly. Add the greens and cover; cook until the greens have reduced by half, about 7 to 10 minutes. They should retain their color but be soft and edible.

    4. Serve fish over greens.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 285 calories; 14.6 g fat; 2.3 g saturated fat; 116.7 mg cholesterol; 31.3 g protein; 9.6 g carbohydrates; 5.2 g fiber; 817.4 mg sodium

  • The Beauty of Wine

    You cheered when news broke that a glass of red wine a day is actually good for your heart. Turns out it’s not just imbibing the stuff (in moderation, of course) that may have health benefits.

    Reasons to toast vino's rejuvenating powers.
    by O'Rya Hyde-Keller
  • Think Outside the Bag

    Talk about a serendipitous event: Legend has it that chance brewed the first tea when Camellia sinensis leaves blew into a pot of boiling water. It was 2737 BC, and the accidental teameister who boiled that water, Chinese Emperor Shen Nung, concluded the new brew gave “vigor of body, contentment of mind, and determination of purpose.”

    Get all the benefits of tea without curing up with a cup.
    By Bryce Edmonds
  • What a Catch

    Lobster and tuna and barramundi—oh my! Standing in front of the fish counter isn’t as easy as it used to be. Tuna or tilapia, salmon or sardines, farmed or wild, fresh or frozen—the choices are enough to make my head swim … I mean spin. Plus, I’m nursing a newborn, and it just seems easier to skip seafood altogether instead of making the wrong choice.

    How to choose the most sustainable seafood
    By Allison Young / Recipes by Rebecca Caro
  • Salmon Dill Soup

    2 medium salmon fillets, skin removed
    2 cups water
    1 medium sweet potato, peeled and diced
    2 medium carrots, peeled and diced
    1/2 onion, diced
    3 cups vanilla rice milk
    1/2 cup finely chopped fresh dill, stems removed
    1 teaspoon salt
    6 tablespoons cornstarch

    1. Slice each salmon fillet very thinly into bite-sized pieces, and set aside.
    2. In a pot, bring water, sweet potato, carrots, and onion to a boil, then reduce to a medium-high heat, cover, and cook until vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes.
    3. Add rice milk and bring to a boil.
    4. Add salmon, dill, and salt, and reduce heat to medium until salmon is done, about 3 minutes.
    5. Mix cornstarch with just enough cold water to dissolve and add to soup. Bring soup to a boil while stirring, and allow mixture to thicken for 1 to 2 minutes.
    6. Remove from heat and serve warm.

    nutrition info per serving (4 to 6): 322.9 calories; 4.7 g fat; 1.5 g saturated fat; 30 mg cholesterol; 17 g protein; 52.5 g carbohydrates; 2.5 g fiber; 516.3 mg sodium

  • Got (Non-Dairy) Milk?

    As the mustached celebrities in those milk ads tell us, milk does a body good thanks to its calcium, vitamin D, and other nutrients. But what if you’re lactose intolerant, vegan, or simply not a fan of cow’s milk? You have plenty of nondairy options—from the more common ones like soy and rice milks to the nut, oat, and even hemp varieties.

    By Erin Quinn
  • Grilled Halibut with Fava Bean Mash

    Halibut fillet
    Salt and pepper to taste
    1/2 cup fava beans
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
     

    1. Season halibut fillet with salt and pepper, grill 3 minutes on each side or until cooked through.
    2. In a medium bowl, combine fava beans,  olive oil, and lemon juice. Mash roughly with a fork until combined.
    3. Place fish on top of the fava bean mash.

  • So Long, Sugar!

    Ousting the sweet stuff from your diet can temper a litany of health complaints, from high cholesterol to digestive woes. But don’t go cold turkey—that can lead to lethargy, headaches, and mood swings—especially if you have a serious sweet tooth. To help you go sugar free without the side effects:

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Roasted Red Pepper and Fava Crostini

    1 baguette, cut into 1/2-inch slices
    Olive oil
    1 cup roasted red peppers
    3/4 cup fava beans
    1 garlic clove
     

    1. Arrange baguette slices on baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, and bake at 375 degrees for 5 minutes or until golden.
    2. In a food processor, pulse roasted red peppers, fava beans, and garlic clove until combined.
    3. Spread 1 tablespoon of mixture onto each slice of bread.