Food & Recipes

  • Three Cheers for Organic

    Your wine rack could practically earn the USDA Organic seal, but what about your liquor cabinet? Organic liquors made from ingredients grown without synthetic chemicals or pesticides abound these days. Plus, many organic brands implement ethical and environmentally friendly business practices that make buying their booze a no-brainer.

    By O'Rya Hyde-Keller
  • Seared Scallops with Udon Noodles

    Serves 4

    For the scallops

    2 tablespoons flour
    2 tablespoons panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    8 to 16 scallops (2 to 4 per person)
    1 tablespoon olive oil

    For the noodles
    1 package udon noodles
    2 tablespoons sesame oil
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 scallions, thinly sliced
    1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
    1/4 cup tamari or shoyu (soy sauce)
    Black sesame seeds and fresh cilantro for garnish (optional)

    For the scallops

    1. Combine the first three ingredients in a large Ziploc bag, and shake thoroughly. 
    2. Add scallops, seal the bag, and shake to coat. 
    3. Heat oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add scallops, cook 3 minutes on each side, or until done. Remove from heat.

    For the noodles
    1. Cook udon noodles according to package directions; drain.
    2. To prepare dressing, combine sesame oil, garlic, scallions, ginger, and shoyu sauce; mix well.
    3. Place noodles in a medium-sized glass or non-reactive stainless dish; add dressing and mix well to coat noodles. 
    4. Serve noodles hot or cold with 2 to 4 scallops on top, and garnish with sesame seeds and cilantro.

    nutrition info per serving: 378.7 calories; 8.4 g fat; 1.6 g saturated fat; 9.9 mg cholesterol; 14.3 g protein; 60.1 g carbohydrates; 0.8 g fiber; 797.8 mg sodium

  • Sweet Potato and Apple Casserole

    2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
    1 1/2 cups fresh apple juice
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1/2 teaspoon each cinnamon, nutmeg, ground ginger
    (or ¼ teaspoon freshly grated ginger)
    4 apples, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
    1/3 cup raisins

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease a 13-by-9-inch baking pan, and add sweet potatoes.
    2. In a small bowl, combine apple juice, vanilla, and spices. Pour mixture over sweet potatoes, cover, and bake for 50 minutes.
    3. Add apples and raisins; cover, and bake for 30 minutes or until tender. Uncover, and bake for 5 minutes to brown the top. Serve warm.

    nutrition info per serving (8): 124 calories; 0 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 31 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 22 mg sodium

  • Grilled Salmon With Braised Rutabaga

    Ingredients:

    1 tablespoon butter
    1 large rutabaga cut into 1-inch chunks
    Salt and pepper
    1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
    1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
    1 lemon, juice used only
    2 salmon fillets
    Olive oil
     

    Directions:

    1. Melt butter in skillet
    2. Season rutabaga with salt and pepper.
    3. Add nutmeg, allspice, lemon juice, and rutabaga to skillet. Cook until tender.
    4. Brush salmon fillets with olive oil, add salt and pepper, grill 6 to 8 minutes on each side.
    5. Spoon braised rutabaga onto plate and top with salmon.

  • In Season: Rutabagas

    Best imagined as the lovechild of a cabbage and a turnip, the rutabaga is often overlooked because of its unappetizing name and history as peasant food. But these brassica veggies bring a uniquely sweet yet bitter flavor to most any meal.

    By Jessica Watkins
  • In Season: Rutabagas

    Best imagined as the lovechild of a cabbage and a turnip, the rutabaga is often overlooked because of its unappetizing name and history as peasant food. But these brassica veggies bring a uniquely sweet yet bitter flavor to most any meal.

    By Jessica Watkins
  • Nourishing Happiness

    Two months had passed since my daughter was born, and still I was walking around in a fog. I understand, based on comments from friends and family, that I radiated happiness during this time, but what I remember is struggling with sleeplessness and the constant demands of a newborn—my 8-pound bundle of joy had the clear upper hand.

    The yogic way to feed body and spirit
    By Melissa B. Williams
  • Spice Up the Season

    Feel guilty sipping eggnog or munching on gingersnaps? These holiday goodies may not be as bad as you think. Some of the most commonly used spices in traditional treats can reduce inflammation, lower your risk of heart disease, and more, says Sarah Krieger, RD, national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

    By Celia Shatzman
  • Fruit Fighters

    The term “superfruits” might make you think of cape-clad produce ready to leap to your nutritional rescue. In fact, many marketers want you to believe that mysterious fruits like mangosteens and goji berries have magical health-boosting properties.

    Fend off disease with these natural - and delicious - healers.
    By Molly Lyons
  • Chai

    3 cups water
    1 tablespoon cardamom pods and seeds (about 15)
    1 teaspoon whole cloves
    1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
    2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced (or more to taste)
    2 cinnamon sticks
    1/4 teaspoon fennel seed
    4 teaspoons Assam black
    tea leaves
    1 1/2 cups milk
    Raw honey

    1. In a saucepan, bring water and spices to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 15 minutes.
    2. Remove from heat, add tea, and steep for 8 minutes.
    3. Strain the tea, discarding the leaves and spices, and return tea to the saucepan. Add milk and heat through. Serve with raw honey to taste.
    Note: If you’re caffeine-sensitive, opt for decaf rooibos tea leaves, or omit the tea altogether and have spiced milk.
    nutrition info per serving (using 2% milk)

    50 calories; 1.9 g fat; 1.2 g saturated fat; 7.3 mg cholesterol; 3.1 g protein; 5.3 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 37.8 mg sodium